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Amazon Prime Instant Video - Page 39

post #1141 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

OK .. I was under the impression that Amazon did the same thing Netflix does when it comes to content .. a fixed amount of money for a package deal that allows them to offer the content within a certain timeframe with unlimited streaming rights until the expiration of the package deal ..

I thought Netflix also had some deals like I mentioned. It's probably just a combination depending on the studio they are getting it from and what they think the demand will be.
post #1142 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by lokilarry View Post

I have received packages on Saturday delivered by FEDEX.

FedEx and UPS used to charge a substantial premium for Saturday delivery, but with the USPS starting to beat them out for Amazon's business, they may be dropping that, at least for Amazon deliveries.
post #1143 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

OK .. I was under the impression that Amazon did the same thing Netflix does when it comes to content .. a fixed amount of money for a package deal that allows them to offer the content within a certain timeframe with unlimited streaming rights until the expiration of the package deal ..
Since Amazon also has content that is pay per view I'm sure the content owner/creator is probably getting a percentage of each viewing.
post #1144 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

Since Amazon also has content that is pay per view I'm sure the content owner/creator is probably getting a percentage of each viewing.

On all PPV content, the rights owner does get a piece of the action .. same with VUDU .. I'm talking generally about the bulk packages that the fixed fee monthly streamers pay .. Netflix, Amazon, HULU ..

I don't know exactly about Amazons arrangements, but, with maybe some small exceptions, Netflix buys the rights to a package from the rights owner .. basically renting the package for a defined period of time for X dollars .. in return for unlimited streaming rights until the package expires .. a license agreement .. with no kickback to the owner each time a program gets streamed ..

This was one of the reasons we went thru that whole Netflix price increase, streaming arm separation a while back .. the studios suddenly decided that their content packages were worth more than what Netflix had been paying in the past ..

In the Netflix financials I get (I'm a stockholder) .. they specifically mention that they currently have 7.3 Billion in streaming content package acquisition costs that essentially has to be paid within 3 years .. this item in their financials has been growing for the last few years ..
post #1145 of 1235
A question just occurred to me .. are the Prime titles that are offered as PPV yet are also part of Prime Streaming .. ?? I'd guess there are ..
post #1146 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

A question just occurred to me .. are the Prime titles that are offered as PPV yet are also part of Prime Streaming .. ?? I'd guess there are ..


That would be a big fat noooooo. :) A Prime subscriber doesn't get access to new releases included with their yearly $79 membership fee.

There are 2 separate services here...the Amazon Video Store, which sells Pay per view rental and purchased digital downloads of current tv series and recently released on dvd movies. And the Amazon Prime free add on, Amazon Prime Instant, which is the Netflix like, pay tv service, providing you with movies and shows, collected under the same set of guidelines Netflix and other monthly subscription services operate under. Recent films come only after the disc/PPV exclusivity period of 6 months has ended. Not before.

 

It would be nice if they broke out the 2 services  so it wouldn't confuse people, but for obvious business reasons, they'd like people to be exposed (and tempted to spend more money) to the ppv titles while exploring what's available for free as part of Amazon Instant.

post #1147 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

A question just occurred to me .. are the Prime titles that are offered as PPV yet are also part of Prime Streaming .. ?? I'd guess there are ..

Could you rephrase that? I can't parse out what you mean.

All of the Prime titles are also offered as PPV to non-Prime-members. The PPV titles which aren't designated as Prime cannot be streamed for free by anyone.
post #1148 of 1235
In the Netflix thread there was talk recently about amazon streaming more in 1080p. Can anyone comment not that here?

I'm a Prime subscriber but we really don't make use of their video much. I'm constantly in debate on choosing between amazon, iTunes, and Netflix.
post #1149 of 1235
I know I've seen some Amazon streams on my PS4 show up in 1080P.
post #1150 of 1235
People have seen 1080p and supposedly it's available on a subset of devices, including the PS3, but I can't seem to get it on mine. Someone who says that he works for Amazon stated that Amazon 1080p video is ludicrously encoded at 10 Mbps (up from < 3 Mbps for 720p); this would make it difficult for a large percentage of their customers to receive. My nominal connection speed is 100 Mbps but that doesn't mean that I'll get the 12 Mbps that it probably takes to stay ahead of that stream on a connection to Amazon's servers.
post #1151 of 1235
I've seen a *few* Amazon 1080P streams on my Kindle Fire HDX. (indicates 1080p on the tablet) But it was for movies I puchased or were already in my library.

Haven't seen any Prime Instant in 1080 on_my_Kindle.
post #1152 of 1235

My month long trial expired last week. While I did see some 1080 streams for Stargate Atlantis-on a Samsung UN32EH5300 HDTV's embedded Amazon app, I never thought to check for any on the PS3.

post #1153 of 1235
I need to try my devices. Is 1080p at 10 Mbps is going to become the new norm for amazon content, it just got a lot more compelling.
post #1154 of 1235
I just tried it again on my PS3; still no joy.
post #1155 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

People have seen 1080p and supposedly it's available on a subset of devices, including the PS3, but I can't seem to get it on mine. Someone who says that he works for Amazon stated that Amazon 1080p video is ludicrously encoded at 10 Mbps (up from < 3 Mbps for 720p); this would make it difficult for a large percentage of their customers to receive. My nominal connection speed is 100 Mbps but that doesn't mean that I'll get the 12 Mbps that it probably takes to stay ahead of that stream on a connection to Amazon's servers.

Michael, I'm curious why you think Amazon 1080p video encoded at 10 Mbps is ludicrous? Doesn't VUDU encode some of their HDX video at 9 Mbps? Is it just the big leap from 3 Mbps for 720p?

If a connection to VUDU for 9 Mbps works fine why would 10 Mbps be a challenge to get off Amazon servers? Are they different from the servers VUDU uses - Limelight and Akamai?
post #1156 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post

Michael, I'm curious why you think Amazon 1080p video encoded at 10 Mbps is ludicrous? Doesn't VUDU encode some of their HDX video at 9 Mbps? Is it just the big leap from 3 Mbps for 720p?

If a connection to VUDU for 9 Mbps works fine why would 10 Mbps be a challenge to get off Amazon servers? Are they different from the servers VUDU uses - Limelight and Akamai?
Not only that I rented HDX movies from VUDU when I had 6 mbps DSL. They displayed fine and the VUDU speedtest said my connection was good enough for it.
post #1157 of 1235
VUDU titles have 3 HDX encodes, ranging from 4.5 Mbps to 9 Mbps, so people with much slower network service can view VUDU 1080p. Netflix 1080p ranges from 3.85 to 5.8 Mbps (plus .192 or .096 Mbps for sound). 10 Mbps for Amazon 1080p is ludicrous because it's not necessary and only a minor subset of Amazon customers will have the necessary connection speed. And even with a high enough connection speed to stay ahead of 10 Mbps (about 12 Mbps) you're not guaranteed to be able to sustain that on connections to Amazon's servers; I can't get it on my 100 Mbps service. Why have 1080p at a bit rate that the great majority of your customers can't get?
post #1158 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

VUDU titles have 3 HDX encodes, ranging from 4.5 Mbps to 9 Mbps, so people with much slower network service can view VUDU 1080p. Netflix 1080p ranges from 3.85 to 5.8 Mbps (plus .192 or .096 Mbps for sound). 10 Mbps for Amazon 1080p is ludicrous because it's not necessary and only a minor subset of Amazon customers will have the necessary connection speed. And even with a high enough connection speed to stay ahead of 10 Mbps (about 12 Mbps) you're not guaranteed to be able to sustain that on connections to Amazon's servers; I can't get it on my 100 Mbps service. Why have 1080p at a bit rate that the great majority of your customers can't get?

No rhyme no reason to the way these things work. I have TWC 30Mbps and we consistently get the 1080p connection for Amazon on my F9000 amazon app.
post #1159 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

VUDU titles have 3 HDX encodes, ranging from 4.5 Mbps to 9 Mbps, so people with much slower network service can view VUDU 1080p. Netflix 1080p ranges from 3.85 to 5.8 Mbps (plus .192 or .096 Mbps for sound). 10 Mbps for Amazon 1080p is ludicrous because it's not necessary and only a minor subset of Amazon customers will have the necessary connection speed. And even with a high enough connection speed to stay ahead of 10 Mbps (about 12 Mbps) you're not guaranteed to be able to sustain that on connections to Amazon's servers; I can't get it on my 100 Mbps service. Why have 1080p at a bit rate that the great majority of your customers can't get?

Because Amazon doesn't offer a streaming service for people to subscribe to. People subscribe to Prime for shipping and the streaming service is just something that is added on, whether the user wants it or not.
post #1160 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

VUDU titles have 3 HDX encodes, ranging from 4.5 Mbps to 9 Mbps, so people with much slower network service can view VUDU 1080p. Netflix 1080p ranges from 3.85 to 5.8 Mbps (plus .192 or .096 Mbps for sound). 10 Mbps for Amazon 1080p is ludicrous because it's not necessary and only a minor subset of Amazon customers will have the necessary connection speed. And even with a high enough connection speed to stay ahead of 10 Mbps (about 12 Mbps) you're not guaranteed to be able to sustain that on connections to Amazon's servers; I can't get it on my 100 Mbps service. Why have 1080p at a bit rate that the great majority of your customers can't get?

Since the FCC allows any connection of 4 Mbps for downloads and 1 Mbps for uploads as fast enough to qualify as "high Speed" .. even a large portion of the 70% within the USA that supposedly have "high Speed" really don't .. so, you're right .. and maybe Amazon wants it that way ..
post #1161 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

Why have 1080p at a bit rate that the great majority of your customers can't get?

Because Amazon doesn't offer a streaming service for people to subscribe to. People subscribe to Prime for shipping and the streaming service is just something that is added on, whether the user wants it or not.

Amazon sells and rents streaming titles to Prime and non-Prime customers. Those people deserve the highest possible video quality even more than Prime customers streaming Prime Instant Video titles.
post #1162 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

Amazon sells and rents streaming titles to Prime and non-Prime customers. Those people deserve the highest possible video quality even more than Prime customers streaming Prime Instant Video titles.

That's why any content I purchase from Amazon I download to my TiVos since it is typically in 1080P24. No idea what the bitrate would be if it were streamed though. But you don't have to worry about any possible streaming issues. I know on my PS4 I tried several titles, some went to 1080P and some didn't. Come to think of it, I think the titles that did stream at 1080P were the ones I had purchased. I'll need to check it out again.
post #1163 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

Amazon sells and rents streaming titles to Prime and non-Prime customers. Those people deserve the highest possible video quality even more than Prime customers streaming Prime Instant Video titles.
Amazon will more or less be losing me to Google Play because I can use Play and get 1080p on a series. I rented (or own in the cloud) the BBC 3 series "In the Flesh" for the same price as Amazon but got 1080p and no drop downs in resolution. And I use Chromecast for that.
post #1164 of 1235
The necessity of using a phone or tablet app to control Chromecast makes it entirely unappealing to me.
post #1165 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

The necessity of using a phone or tablet app to control Chromecast makes it entirely unappealing to me.

Which is why I use my Apple TV not Chromecast for Netflix, Hulu etc.

However if the Chromecast (or Apple TV) added support for Amazon instant I would use it in a heart beat.

I had to put my mothballed Roku 2 XS back into service on my main TV yesterday for Amazon (Airplay picture quality is poor) - and low and behold it still had the horrendous pink screen / color space issues with my receiver (see the long old threads on the Roku forums). The 'fix seems to be to set it to output to stereo only and color space through my receiver stays as RGB standard. We watched 39 Steps (UK TV 2010 TV version) last night on Amazon and it looked pretty good.

I would love to see Amazon on one of my other devices and the Roku 2 XS could go back to the cupboard.

The Chromecast was also a nice back up when Netflix was poor on Apples TVs late last year. I still use Rokus on my other TVs
post #1166 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

I just tried it again on my PS3; still no joy.
Funny how you can't get 1080p from Amazon but you NEVER biggrin.gif have problems with Netflix on your flawless 100 Mpbs Open Connect ISP. Some can't even stream SD on Netflix but can get 1080p on Amazon no problems. I can even sometimes get 1080p from Amazon and I did get it on my Roku 3 for a while but now it is back to the 720p streams again.
post #1167 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddice View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

I just tried it again on my PS3; still no joy.
Funny how you can't get 1080p from Amazon but you NEVER biggrin.gif have problems with Netflix on your flawless 100 Mpbs Open Connect ISP.

Ah, the glorious mystery that is the Internet biggrin.gif! I'm on the same footing as everyone else with all of the other streaming video service (well, somewhat better than people who have nominally 10 Mbps and slower service); Open Connect only helps with Netflix.
post #1168 of 1235
I'm not sure I'm getting 1080p, but I am getting a high mbps via Amazon Streaming on my sony blu ray player;






Edited by ginobli2311 - 2/10/14 at 3:50pm
post #1169 of 1235
I wouldn't trust what that old player says. That is the worst Amazon streaming app I have on my Sony BD players out of all the Amazon streaming devices I have. I forgot how bad it was until last night when I used it to stream "The After". But with the Sony IP Noise Reduction it makes the streaming picture look better than other devices. I'm hoping they update the app for the 2014 models since I plan on replacing one of my Sony S5100 BD players with an S6200 model.
post #1170 of 1235
It's not an old player. It's one bought within the last year. Yes, the app sucks, but the PQ is noticeably better on this device for Netflix and Amazon than on my old PS3 it replaced.

I don't think it matters whether you get 100 mbps or 12 mbps...as long as you don't buffer or see PQ fluctuates mid stream (like my chromecast does at times)
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