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Windows 32bit or 64, wich works better for HTPC use? - Page 4

post #91 of 147
I use only Windows x64 since 2008!
My HTPC is configured,now:

-W7 pro x64
-Windows Media Center with pctv DVB-T
-Media Broweser 2.3
-MyMovies 3.19
-Zoom Player v7.10 (madVR, and EVR, AC3, H264)
-ffdshow (upscaling intensive)
-avsynth (intensive CPU double frame rate)

everything, work !!!


My hw:
i7 950@3.2ghz-Nvidia GTS450-Noctua Nh C12P 14SE-Silverstone LC13-Asrock X58 Extreme 3- Corsair DDR3 1600Mhz CL8-WD 1TB Caviar Black SATA3- 2x WD 2TB Caviar Green-Mitsubishi HC-3800.

There are not reasons for x86 OS on 2011!!!!!
post #92 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by jong1 View Post

Multiple 2TB drives are not a problem on 32-bit W7.

Even data drives >2TB are not a problem for W7 32-bit (assuming default 4KB cluster size is used).

The only problem is that 32-bit Windows must boot from a drive with a MBR and MBR does not support drives >2TB. So your boot drive needs to be no larger than 2TB (or any extra space will be unusable).

Not a problem. All you need to do is partition the drive so the boot partition containing the OS is a manageable size.

I can't believe this debate is still raging on. Someone said it perfectly in a prior post. If you're building a new machine from scratch then go with 64-bit. Compatibility issues and hard-to-find drivers with 64-bit Windows is pretty much a thing of the past.

If you're still using older hardware and software, stick with the 32-bit OS.

If 64-bit scares you, stay with 32-bit. Both OSes will work equally well with Media Center and you probably won't even notice any difference.

The only absolute requirement for going with 64-bit is if you want more than 4GB of memory. Besides that, use what makes you happy.
post #93 of 147
Booting from a GPT (required to manage a drive > 2TiB instead of MBR) partition still requires Windows Vista/7/Server 2008 64-bit and UEFI (Microsoft: WHDC: Using GPT Drives).
post #94 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by captain_video View Post

Not a problem. All you need to do is partition the drive so the boot partition containing the OS is a manageable size.

Thanks. You are right. I've corrected my post to avoid more web disinformation and credited you.
post #95 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by renethx View Post

Booting from a GPT (required to manage a drive > 2TiB) partition still requires Windows Vista/7/Server 2008 64-bit and UEFI (Microsoft: WHDC: Using GPT Drives).

I thought that too. there is a lot of disinformation out there. But a drive with an MBR can have up to 4 2TB partitions. So good for a 8TB drive.
post #96 of 147
Did somebody tried to boot from a 3TB disk with Windows 32-bit/BIOS? I took the MS words for granted that I never thought of that.
post #97 of 147
I've read some more and now I'm not so sure again .

As you say, we need someone who has tried it. Anyway, limiting myself to 1 boot drive no bigger than 2TB is not a big issue (for the next few years at least)!
post #98 of 147
The critical point is that MBR supports only up to

512 bytes x 2^32 = 2 x 2^40 bytes = 2TiB = 2.199TB.

If the size of the physical sectors were 4K, it would support more than 2TiB, but this is not the case right now. All test results I have seen (including my own test with WD30EZRS) is that booting from a 3TB HDD is possible with Windows 32-bit (the partition table is then MBR). After Windows installed and you go to the disk manger, you will see a 3TB drive, with the first 2TB partition as the system drive, but you can't create a partition in the rest 746.5GB unpartitioned space, like this (precisely this error message; this exactly shows the limitation of MBR).
post #99 of 147
Even some reviews that say boot drives >2TB (or more accurately 2TiB, as you say) are not possible leave a grey area. They say the start sector of a partition cannot be >2TiB, but it opens up the possibility of a 2nd partition just under 2TiB (say just after 2TB) with a 2TB size, thus allowing use of disc drives up to ~4TB. Have you tried this?
post #100 of 147
Link to the source?
post #101 of 147
This discusses the theoretical possibility, says it does not work with Windows (but does with others), but his testing does not seem to have been done with a version of Windows that supports even the concept of a drive >2TiB (especially W7).

This review, which I found first, says the drive limit is 2TiB, but its reason for this (start sector must be <2TiB) leaves grey what happens if a 2TiB partition is created just below the first 2TiB.

I'm not claiming either of these are authoritative, or even particularly hopeful! But it does sound like it is worth trying.
post #102 of 147
Thanks. I will try.
post #103 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by jong1 View Post

Multiple 2TB drives are not a problem on 32-bit W7.

Even data drives >2TB are not a problem for W7 32-bit (assuming default 4KB cluster size is used).

The only problem is that 32-bit Windows must boot from a drive with a MBR and support for drives bigger than 2TB with MBR is "problematic" (see discussion that follows!).

This illustrates the problem.
Seagate preparing 3TB drives with no 32-bit support
http://www.myce.com/news/seagate-pre...support-29811/

But there are always workarounds

http://www.slashgear.com/hitachi-3tb...-oem-14119357/
post #104 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chili99 View Post

This illustrates the problem.
Seagate preparing 3TB drives with no 32-bit support
http://www.myce.com/news/seagate-pre...support-29811/

But there are always workarounds

http://www.slashgear.com/hitachi-3tb...-oem-14119357/

Yes, more confusion. That article title really does not help. But I guess "Seagate launches drive that cannot be fully utilised with XP 32-bit, only as a data drive in 32-bit Vista and Windows 7, except, maybe it might be possible to create two partitions on a bootable drive - one ~1TB in size and one ~2TB in size" probably is a bit of a mouthful!
post #105 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmservo View Post

This is basically fud. I hate to call out another poster, so please don't take offense. But think about what is here. Of the current Antivirus software, almost all are x64 ready (Avast, AVG, Norton, McAfee, ESET, Trend, Microsoft) and Microsoft Essentials, which I'd recommend, is free and built for x64.

Nah, please call me out any time! It is the only way to learn...and I am not always clear the first time around.

I was referring to not having to buy everything all over again. Sure, if you are starting from the beginning, there is nothing to worry about with 64 bit. But if you already have software and hardware you have to be careful.


Quote:


I assume if you're looking to drag along old hardware, you have different considerations. But if you're starting from scratch, there is no justifiable reason I can think of to chose x32.

Yep.
post #106 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by assassin View Post

I doubt a beginner is piecing together a HTPC from old parts. There is not a steeper learning curve when using 64 bit from new parts.

Just saying.

From the number of threads titled something like "repurpose old PC for HTPC", I would guess most beginners say "hmmm...I have an old PC lying around, I wonder if I can get into this HTPC stuff".

Not the best plan, but for little up front money you can setup a working HTPC. Besides, the upgrade bug is contageous, so that person would have an entirely new setup within the year...at which point they will move to 64 bit.


But I think it was said best earlier, if you are repurposing old hardware, go 32 bit. Starting with everything new, go 64 bit.

I am waiting for Windows 8 to go 64 bit, personally.
post #107 of 147
The thing is that many machines from 4 or 5 years ago were 64-bit capable and will run x64 software with no problems. Generally speaking, you need to be repurposing a really old machine (or have some pre-Vista or specialty peripherals) to have issues with x64 these days.
post #108 of 147
I'm currently tweaking my htpc. I have win7 64bit but I'm thinking of going to 32 bit. It's my understanding that there aren't any firewire STB drivers for 64 bit windows and I'd love to be able to play/control my 8300HD cable box with my pc. Has this been solved?
post #109 of 147
There is still a lot of apps for HTPC use that still are 32 bit (TMT, XBMC, Reclock etc) and MPC-HC if HD bitstreaming is required. On a 64 bit system this goes to the WinSXS 32bit ->64bit emulator

On desktop systems used as HTPC with dual channel memory and large on die memory cache, this is moot and it is down to preference as to which bitdepth is preferable.

Nettops such as the Atom and Zacate are interesting for HTPC use as it offers the the possibility of running completely passive. I find this very desirable for living room use.

The main stumbling block is the reduced memory bandwidth which is single channel and clocked at a lower speed. Additionally the GPU competes with the CPU for the same memory channel.

The overhead of the 32bit to 64bit emulation makes itself felt on a nettop in the form of sluggish UI response. Using a 32bit OS avoids this overhead.

Nettops and netbooks are one of the main reasons why 32bit W7 is still around.
post #110 of 147
The realization of 64 bit is finally taking hold. We've had 64 bit capable machines for years but its been a slow push. 64 bit is becoming the standard.
post #111 of 147
Sorry to bring up an old thread, but has the overall consensus between 32 and 64 bit versions shifted in 2 years?
post #112 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcaradonna View Post

Sorry to bring up an old thread, but has the overall consensus between 32 and 64 bit versions shifted in 2 years?
I have no idea what you mean by 'consensus'. No reason not to use 64 bit.
post #113 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by dictionary.com 
con·sen·sus [kuhn-sen-suhs] noun

1. majority of opinion
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/consensus


Yes, the consensus is to go 64 bit. I laughed when I saw that I was not going 64 bit until Win8. I am still on Win7, with no plans to go to Win8, and am 64 bit.
post #114 of 147
a 32 bit bus can address 2^32 = 4294967296 address spaces. Typically, an address space is a byte (data bus is 8 bits). So, if you divide that number by 1024 you get kilobyte, by 1024 again to get megabyte and by 1024 again to get gigabyte. You end up with 4. This means 4GB is the max mem size on a 32 bit bus, assuming the data bus is 8 bits (1 byte). Now, if you have a mother board that will support more, then they must be doing paging. That's a different topic.
post #115 of 147
Holy crap... 32 bit is like a Dinosaur.


We are still talking about this ? Freaking run out and get 64bit and don't look back. 32bit is like connecting to the internet with a dial up modem.
post #116 of 147
If the old hardware supports 64, then yes, 64. If the hardware does not support 64 bit, what's the point on installing 64 on 32 bit hardware?
post #117 of 147
Who on earth is still running hardware that doesn't support 64-bit in an HTPC?
post #118 of 147
You guys realize the last post in this thread was six months ago and that someone joined AVS just to post a math lesson that you're replying to and freaking out over.

But, you keep feeding the trolls...
post #119 of 147
I don't pay attention to post dates unless it's the one directly above my reply.
post #120 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

Holy crap... 32 bit is like a Dinosaur.


We are still talking about this ? Freaking run out and get 64bit and don't look back. 32bit is like connecting to the internet with a dial up modem.

It is? Really? For HTPC use? The only difference in HTPC's is how many extenders you can run at the same time off the machine.
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