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My Mahogany / Invisible Speaker build - Page 12

post #331 of 385
Newcastle uses a European Sankey
http://www.kegworks.com/products/keg-taps.html
post #332 of 385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

Newcastle uses a European Sankey
http://www.kegworks.com/products/keg-taps.html

Ah, now I see, and once again Tim proves himself to be the beermeister!!

I guess a simple Google search would have answered my own question, and now I know that Sankey doesn't necessarily equal Sankey. Six different taps used worldwide...

New coupler ordered so hopefully I'll be enjoying a pint of brown ale in a couple days! smile.gif
post #333 of 385
Thread Starter 
Liquor Bottle Display - Wrap Up

So my goal today was to get quite a bit of the bar wrapped up, but when I woke up this morning, I knew something funky was going on. With about 5" of snow last night, I figured we'd wake up to the generator being on, but the non-generator circuits were acting weird. After plugging in a multimeter to an outlet and seeing 66 VAC, the funky behavior finally made sense, so I flipped the main breakers off (to protect any motors that might try to run, e.g. pool equipment, spa), and we lived off the generator until about noon when the power was restored. It's amazing how many times I think to myself "okay, I'll just go rip this piece of wood to width..." and then realize that unless I want to pull the hand saw out, I'm not ripping anything without the power on... smile.gif

That aside, I did some mock-ups on how the lighting could work for the liquor bottle display. Here's my first stab at it, which was just temporarily sticking the strip LEDs onto the backs of the vertical risers of the display:

(so this view is from the back side of the risers.)


I'd give this look about a C+ grade. It's okay, but I don't like how you can see the reflection of each individual LED:



So I mocked up a little channel that would better direct the light only up to the glass shelf:

(I know it's a hack job but remember that I had no power in the shop at this point... smile.gif )


But the effect is better, I think:



So once the power did restore, I built three little light "uplifter" channels, ran the LEDs along the bottom of them, and then mounted each underneath its glass shelf.

Now onto the mirror. I needed something that was about 14" x 45", and was quite happy to find this at Home Depot:



All I needed to do was to trim it to width (length), which starts with scoring the cut:



And then breaking it along the score:



A couple of spacers on the back of the cabinet:



And then it was time to install the back piece that supports the mirror:

It's probably a bit difficult to figure out what you're looking at in this picture, but the middle part is the mirror (and reflection), the top is the actual wood of the arched top, and the bottom is the piece of plywood that I'm inserting into the back.


Finally, the end effect:



If you stand near the display, you can see the LED sources below:



But for the most part, I'm hoping that won't be a big deal. Here's a view from the other side:


I have to say that I'm pretty happy with how it turned out. I know the final design wasn't everyone's cup of tea, but I like the effect of the underlighting and how the reflection of the columns makes it look / feel like there are 4 columns holding up the top, like I was hoping for.

Last major task now is to finish the drawer boxes (which I've been holding off due to a lack of drawer slides, which should be here on Monday) and then a few details here and there. I'll post some final shots of the whole bar as soon as everything is complete....
post #334 of 385
Looks great! I think the design has proven very good, and of course the execution is impeccable, as always.

Pictures of mirrors are always weird. I looked at this for at least five seconds thinking, "What is that weird tool with the pencil sticking through it? Did he draw on the glass to mark the line?" ...and I work with reels of pneumatic hose all the time - I just never look at them from that angle. smile.gif
post #335 of 385
Stunning !

Cheers,
post #336 of 385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

Looks great! I think the design has proven very good, and of course the execution is impeccable, as always.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter M View Post

Stunning !

Thank you both!

The bar is starting to become functional and was put to use yesterday for some incredible football games! Gotta love the NFL in December... smile.gif
post #337 of 385
Awesome as usual. I think it turned out great. And the mirror making it looks like 4 columns is genius!
post #338 of 385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcascio View Post

Awesome as usual. I think it turned out great. And the mirror making it looks like 4 columns is genius!

Thanks, Mario! Here's a more straight-on shot that tries to show that effect:



And while I continue to wait for my drawer slide hardware, I figured I'd post a few more shots of the bar:



A shot of the front bar railing:

(These photographs seem to make things look more red than they actually are, which to my eye appears more brown.)

And the paneling below that:

The parts of the brass foot railing that hit the floor swing up for easy sweeping, and while I doubt anyone will ever use them, I found those stainless steel purse hooks for under the bar and had to put them in there...


The tap tower and matching drip tray (which is plumbed into the sink drain):



And some hanging glass storage above the coffee machine:



Since I have three separate controllers on the LED strip lighting, I can put the bar into different color combinations. Here's its Christmas mode:


For St. Paddy's:


For the 4th of July:


And so on. Kinda fun! smile.gif
post #339 of 385
I like the draft tower. cool.gif

I currently have a poor man's kegerator (fridge) in the basement, but like the idea of something integrated like that. smile.gif
post #340 of 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowger View Post

For shelf dadoes, I've had the best luck either by doing those on the table saw (with a dado stack and a good selection of shims) or with this router jig. Here's a quick picture:




I strongly agree with DGF that trying to mill out a dado of the correct width and depth in a single pass with a full-width router bit is asking quite a bit (of the bit, router, setup, and operator), especially with a 1/4" shank. If you're doing multiple passes, then there are a number of errors that potentially could be introduced that would lead to a sloppy fit.

Having a jig that works on a two-pass principle with a thinner bit (e.g. 3/8" or 1/2") means that it will work with every piece of plywood you'll ever encounter. IMO, even the 23/32" measurement can vary pretty significantly between different pieces of plywood.

I know it means extra time and materials to build the jig, but it's not bad and I'm confident you'll be much happier with the results.

Good luck!!! smile.gif

Bryan

Hi Bryan - sorry to hijack your thread again with my lame woodworking skills- your bar is gorgeous!

I started to make the jig using hardboard and followed the directions that a little overlap on the sides would be OK. Tonight I routed the sides using a straight bit to make them even but the ends came out like this:



Not sure where I went wrong or if this will affect when I run them through the table saw to make the grooves....
post #341 of 385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefftr View Post

Hi Bryan - sorry to hijack your thread again with my lame woodworking skills- your bar is gorgeous!

I started to make the jig using hardboard and followed the directions that a little overlap on the sides would be OK. Tonight I routed the sides using a straight bit to make them even but the ends came out like this:

Not sure where I went wrong or if this will affect when I run them through the table saw to make the grooves....

Not a hijack and I'm glad to help if I possibly can.

If I'm understanding the pictures correctly, the edges with the waviness are the outside edges of the jig, and if that's the case, then they are only important one time -- in making that cut through the tablesaw, as you say.

In that case, I'd offer the following:
- If the waviness protrudes beyond the straight portion of the edges, then this seems like it would cause a problem. In that case, you could use double-sticky tape to temporarily adhere a good straight piece onto these pieces, just beyond the existing edge, and use that as your reference for making the tablesaw cut.
- OTOH, if the waviness is inside the straight portion, then you should be fine -- just make sure the straight portion is what you focus on to ensure that's against the fence for the entire pass through the saw blade.

I hope that helps. If not, please post some more, and in any case, let us know how it goes!

Bryan
post #342 of 385
Thanks, man - I appreciate all the help and advice. Hey, can I pay you to come build a bar for me?? rolleyes.gif
post #343 of 385
Thread Starter 
My new keg coupler arrived today -- finally -- after being delayed by all the weather...

Note to self: One of these things is not like the other!! Note the longer stem that goes down into the keg on the right:

(US / D System on the left; European / S System on the right, as I've now learned... rolleyes.gif )


Much better!!



My wife bought a poster to dress up that plain wall, so I built a frame using the same molding profile as for the door casing:



Also, I started applying mineral oil to the maple countertops, and was happy to discover that there's some tiger maple striping in the piece that makes up the front near the sink:


Kind of a happy little bonus for me... smile.gif
post #344 of 385
Are those keg couplers labeled? I looked at a keg list for a local liquor store once and seemed to see about 5 or 6 different taps required - but I bet you've got most of it covered with those two. Can you run a nitro pour through your system? A nice fresh Boddington's on nitro is oh so yummy...
post #345 of 385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

Are those keg couplers labeled? I looked at a keg list for a local liquor store once and seemed to see about 5 or 6 different taps required - but I bet you've got most of it covered with those two. Can you run a nitro pour through your system? A nice fresh Boddington's on nitro is oh so yummy...

Good question on the labeling -- I'll actually need to check that.

No on the nitrogen, at least for now, just CO2 currently. I do agree that a keg of Boddi's or Murphy's or Guinness would be fantastic. Perhaps someday... smile.gif
post #346 of 385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowger View Post

Good question on the labeling -- I'll actually need to check that.

I did get a chance to examine the two couplers, but I was unable to see any labeling as to their type. Hopefully I won't have so many different ones that I can't just keep them straight by their looks... smile.gif
post #347 of 385
Thread Starter 
Drawers!

The last major task of this project was to build the drawers. The design called for a total of 6 drawers plus 6 pull-out trays, so I started by building a spreadsheet:

That ended up working out well for me. After inputting the dimensions of each opening, all the rest of the columns were calculated automatically by spreadsheet formulas, which eliminated a lot of the calculation errors I typically make, plus helped me keep everything organized.


Then it was time to start milling parts. After planing down 4/4 Maple material to just over 1/2", the table saw sled helped cut everything to length and ensure that matching parts of the drawers were uniform in length:



On to the dovetail joints. I had purchased a new jig for this, and the first step with that is to set up the jig to define how many tails you want and what the spacing should be:



Milling the tails:



And the pins:



After adjusting things initially (using scrap pieces), it was thankfully pretty easy to yield nice-fitting joints for each corner:



To glue them up, I machined little clamping blocks to span over the pins and just put pressure on the tails:



Each glue-up went pretty smoothly. Glue between the tails only (nothing on the pins) meant that no glue squeezed into the inside of the drawer box:



I milled each pin / tail to be a bit long, and then used a bunch of sanders to trim them and get the sides smooth:



Before:


And after:



All the drawers and trays lined up:



The type of slide I used on the 6 drawers required a 1/4" hole on the back (to receive a hooked tab), so a little drilling jig helped make that happen quickly and consistently:



Mounting some of the hardware on the bottom front of the drawer:

You can see here that while the drawer hardware is designed to use 1/4" thick bottom material, I chose to use 1/2" thick pre-finished Maple plywood, in order to have a stronger bottom to the drawer. That required some extra steps to mill away portions of the bottom where the extra thickness got in the way.

One of the drawers installed:

I chose this soft- and auto-close drawer hardware because it all fits underneath, leaving the sides looking pretty clean.


For three of the pull-out trays, I wanted to create some bottle storage, so it was over to the drill press with the fly cutter to make some holes:

I ended up making a bunch of different diameters, from 2.5" up to 5", plus some rectangular holes for some of the odd-shaped bottles.


I couldn't reach some of the inner holes with the drill press, so for those I had to rough-cut them out with a jigsaw and then used a template and a router to clean them up:

And then I eased all the corners of the circles with a 3/32" radius roundover bit.


I'm having a special on toy train wheels -- let me know how many you guys want! smile.gif



The liquor storage trays installed.

Here I went with heavy duty (100 lb) full-extension slides which seem to handle the loads just fine.


And finally, one of the other slide-out trays:

I had a slight problem here with the door hinges interfering with the pull-out trays (there is one adjusting screw that sticks out a little bit farther than I had anticipated). So these trays got what I'm now calling a Decorative Groove milled along their sides... biggrin.gif
post #348 of 385
Thread Starter 
Final Details

I wanted to dress up the mirror that sits behind the liquor display, and I found an outfit that makes a custom decal that mimics the look of etched glass, sized to fit into whatever size / shape that you have. That arrived just a couple days later:



It comes in a 3-layer sandwich, and the first step is to peel the backing off and discard that:



Then you use a spray bottle to wet the mirror and the back of the decal / transfer paper, and then it's easy to slide it around and into position:

Here I've used the little plastic squeegee they included to push most of the air and water pockets out from the left half.


The decal applied; now the hardest part... waiting 24-48 hours for it to dry!



Finally it was time to carefully peal off the transfer paper, leaving just the decals on the mirror:



I'm happy with how it turned out (though I did need to clean the mirror after this shot):

And of course if we ever get tired of it, it should be easy to peel off and do something else.


And the final look with bottles in place:

It's pretty subtle and based off user experience so far, you have to be sitting there at the bar a while before it gets noticed.


A couple more details...
I added trim strips to the rack to cover all the screw hardware (installed on the left vs. before on the right):



And my good buddy TcMG hooked me up with a *great* deal on a new HDMI matrix switch. It's the Binary switch right in the middle, just underneath the Dune media player:

Not only was I able to upgrade to a much more reliable and better performing solution, I upgraded from a 4x4 to an 8x8, which better fits our house now. Thank you again, Tim!!!

And Cinemar had a driver written to control the new hardware within 2 hours... (I'm not kidding!)


Finally, a shot of the space from May:



The Sketchup model from that same timeframe:



And today:



I can't tell you how much it has meant to me to have you guys follow along, offer wonderful comments along the way, and in several cases, you stepped up and really helped me out! It has been a fun project and now I'm ready to sit back and enjoy it (but not too much...) biggrin.gif

Cheers!!!!!
Bryan
post #349 of 385
Do the door hinges have a full-open detent of any kind? We have a slide-out tray like that in the kitchen, and the inside of the door gets scraped by the corner of the tray if the door isn't carefully positioned out of the way. There's a pretty ugly groove in the finish as a result.
post #350 of 385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

Do the door hinges have a full-open detent of any kind? We have a slide-out tray like that in the kitchen, and the inside of the door gets scraped by the corner of the tray if the door isn't carefully positioned out of the way. There's a pretty ugly groove in the finish as a result.

They do. Once you get the door opened to around 90 degrees, the hinges seem to want to pull themselves open to about 110 degrees, or whatever full-open is for them...
post #351 of 385
Thread Starter 
I thought I'd post a few pictures of the bar area, getting ready to go to work for today's Superbowl party we're hosting. With 15 people coming over, bar business should be good! smile.gif




Food will be set up on the poker table over by the windows, and two 42" high pub tables, along with the bar and theater, will hopefully give everyone a place to hang, eat, drink, etc...



Twin kegs of Newcastle and Bass Ale ready to go:



Inspired by what Mario did with his movie poster display for last year's big game, I re-tasked mine up to rotate between 4 images:








I hope everyone enjoys watching what should be a great game!! biggrin.gif
post #352 of 385
JUST AWESOME ! eek.gif

I absolutely love following your thread, and seeing your pictures. This might be my favorite thread on AVS. Looks great as always. biggrin.gif

PS: I would not mind seeing some more pictures of your theater smile.gif
post #353 of 385
Everything looks fantastic! I'm glad you got to test out the bar for your Super Bowl party.


I'm sure your guests were really impressed with all the hard work! What an incredible space for entertaining.
post #354 of 385
I wish I had a bar like that! Fantastic smile.gif
post #355 of 385
Love everything about it.

Your digital display, I saw how you recessed it into the wall and trimmed out (another fine job BTW). Any heat issues, concerns? Did you remove the insulation? Just curious.
post #356 of 385
Really beautiful work cowger!!
post #357 of 385
the wood work is great and all, but i want the keg of newcastle!
post #358 of 385
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the compliments, guys! For those of you who watched the game, it was obviously not a thriller, but at least we had a "10 x 10 squares" pool going, which gave us something to cheer for... smile.gif

I expected the theater's 7 seats to be taken, plus a couple folks on the stairs, watching the game on the 146" screen in there, with overflow having to watch the smaller 46" display in the bar, but was surprised to find the opposite to be true. A couple of our guests likened it to people hanging out in the kitchen, even though you have a nice living room just 20' away. I'm glad that people seem to enjoy hanging out in the bar. Of course, the close proximity to alcohol surely doesn't hurt... smile.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

JUST AWESOME ! eek.gif

I absolutely love following your thread, and seeing your pictures. This might be my favorite thread on AVS. Looks great as always. biggrin.gif

PS: I would not mind seeing some more pictures of your theater smile.gif

Thanks, bud! The irony of this is not lost on me, btw. Here we are in the "dedicated theater design & construction" section of this forum and I have 11 pages of "bar build" information to 1 puny page of theater build. What can I say... tongue.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktm250rider View Post

the wood work is great and all, but i want the keg of newcastle!

Yup, it's pretty delicious. I'm happy to find that the kegs seem to be lasting just fine, for several months, with the last few mugs seeming to taste just as good as the first. Sadly, the Newcastle keg is just about dry, but that leads into my next hobby attempt, home-brewing beer...
post #359 of 385
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post

Love everything about it.

Your digital display, I saw how you recessed it into the wall and trimmed out (another fine job BTW). Any heat issues, concerns? Did you remove the insulation? Just curious.

Thank you! Good question, and I had my own concerns on this. The wall in which it is mounted is two rows of 2x4s thick, so yes, I did remove the insulation in the first row, about 6" around the display above and below. Here's a shot with the insulation out, just before I cut out the one stud that was in the way:



Also, before I finalized the installation, I built a rather tight-fitting, temporary box around the display, trying to simulate a really snug installation with little-to-no air space around the back and sides of the display. After powering it on for a couple hours (and eventually overnight) and not finding any significant warmth, I concluded that the display was so low-power that I didn't need to worry about heat dissipation.

Hope that helps!
post #360 of 385
Definitely,

Building poster boxes is one of those projects that I always want to get to, but never seem to. Considering time, material and making it work right, a display is a great alternative to a poster box.

Thanks for the info.
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