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DIY Custom-Printed Movie Poster Acoustic Panels - cheap! - Page 3

post #61 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by longshorejl View Post

If I scale my image to 24 x 36 do I then need to add a colored border around the image? I don't want the wrapped fabric to be white on the sides of the panel.

Jim

I would make the border of your image black.

What size border do people recommend?
post #62 of 1197
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cybrsage View Post

I would make the border of your image black.

What size border do people recommend?

In the art world this is known as gallery wrap. Typically, what you will do is extend the color of the outside border enough to wrap around the back. Alternately (depending on the source material), you might mirror the image or otherwise extend the lines of the artwork beyond the image frame in order to accommodate the wrap.

You need enough fabric to wrap around the depth of the frame, and I'd leave at least .5" (1" is better) to staple on the back. So if you're using 2" deep frames on a 36" wide image, you would ideally have a 42" wide print (36" + 2" + 2" + 1" + 1").
post #63 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cybrsage View Post

Did you do the testing yet?

Samples just came Monday afternoon......

I did the subjective testing and posted those, the objective with mic/REW will be this weekend - I need to make a test fixture.
I'm getting new 1st row seats today (was supposed to be yesterday) and want to re-calibrate the HT with those, so doing double duty.

Did the objective testing this weekend, lots of charts/graphs here:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...4#post20147694

Cliff notes
Spoonflower cotton cloth charts
Chart 2a Midrange with spoonflower cotton cloth, baseline and @ 0, 45, 60 degrees
Chart 2b Tweeter with spoonflower cotton cloth, baseline and @ 0, 45, 60 degrees
2a.......................................................... .................................2b



>>My conclusion from the midrange/tweeter charts: spoonflower cotton cloth is AT and good to go for acoustic absorber panels usage.
post #64 of 1197
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post
spoonflower cotton cloth is AT and good to go for acoustic absorber panels usage.
This is seriously great work mtbdudex! Thanks for going through all this trouble, and I'm glad it verified my fantastically non-scientific breath test. I've updated the OP with a link to your results.
post #65 of 1197
Thread Starter 
Update: final pictures (finally) posted.
post #66 of 1197
Those completed posters came out great... I have a hunch I will be creating some acoustically transparent posters to hide my in-wall speakers. Thanks for the great tutorial.
post #67 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post

>>My conclusion from the midrange/tweeter charts: spoonflower cotton cloth is AT and good to go for acoustic absorber panels usage.

Awesome!
post #68 of 1197
Does anyone know where I can find some high res images of Troy Palomalu and other Steelers' images?
post #69 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by cybrsage View Post

Does anyone know where I can find some high res images of Troy Palomalu and other Steelers' images?

I don't know the answer to your question, but you may run into copyright issues with images like that.
post #70 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by dooomi View Post

I don't know the answer to your question, but you may run into copyright issues with images like that.

Yeah, I know. I would contact the owner to cover my bases. I did a search (including on the NFL site and the Steelers site) and found none to even ask about!
post #71 of 1197
the freqency response isn't really necessary --- but does anyone have ETC graphs with this printed fabric? that will give a better indication of absorption (especially at grazing incident angles)

thanks you !
post #72 of 1197
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dooomi View Post

I don't know the answer to your question, but you may run into copyright issues with images like that.

FWIW Spoonflower doesn't seem to care much about that sort of stuff. Use discretion as necessary. For images like that, they are almost always shot under contract for magazines/TV networks and can be difficult to license. If it's an independent photographer, you will often find that you can deal with them directly to get high-res images at a reasonable reproduction price.
post #73 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by luma View Post

FWIW Spoonflower doesn't seem to care much about that sort of stuff. Use discretion as necessary. For images like that, they are almost always shot under contract for magazines/TV networks and can be difficult to license. If it's an independent photographer, you will often find that you can deal with them directly to get high-res images at a reasonable reproduction price.

From what I understand, places such as Spoonflower require us to obtain the rights to the print, they make the assumption we have done so. Good idea for them, since otherwise they are open to a world of hurt.

As I find pictures, I attempt to find the picture taker and contact them, I assume the picture taker knows who has the rights to allow me to print. So far, no replies, but I expected this part to take time.
post #74 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by localhost127 View Post

the freqency response isn't really necessary --- but does anyone have ETC graphs with this printed fabric? that will give a better indication of absorption (especially at grazing incident angles)

thanks you !

I saved my measurements in rew5, so should be able to show this data for 0,45,60 degrees.
(driving home from WDW now, surfing AVS via my new ipad2 3G while my wife is driving her turn)
post #75 of 1197
Hello...

I'm planning on getting printed art on panels and since I'm not much of a DIY...

I know that it would be much cheaper to do it yourself... but I was thinking about getting panels and then order printed fabric. Then I would only need to staple then printed art cloth over a premade panel... OK to do this ?


Thanks in advance.
post #76 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by spike9876 View Post

Hello...

I'm planning on getting printed art on panels and since I'm not much of a DIY...

I know that it would be much cheaper to do it yourself... but I was thinking about getting panels and then order printed fabric. Then I would only need to staple then printed art cloth over a premade panel... OK to do this ?


Thanks in advance.

it's not recommended to double up the layer of fabric if the panel is to be used for broadband absorption to absorb first order specular reflections @ high angles of incident.
post #77 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by localhost127 View Post

it's not recommended to double up the layer of fabric if the panel is to be used for broadband absorption to absorb first order specular reflections @ high angles of incident.

In other words, replace existing fabric on the panels, don't just staple the new fabric over top of it.

Another option is to buy pre-made panel frames, along with the insulation that goes inside it. Your cost will be much much cheaper than buying full panels from the start, and you won't have to dissect anything.

Note: If you can find an insulation supply co. close by, you'll save a good amount on OC703 or equivalent instead of ordering online.
post #78 of 1197
^^^^ Nice resources.
post #79 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDvids4all View Post

In other words, replace existing fabric on the panels, don't just staple the new fabric over top of it.

Another option is to buy pre-made panel frames, along with the insulation that goes inside it. Your cost will be much much cheaper than buying full panels from the start, and you won't have to dissect anything.

Note: If you can find an insulation supply co. close by, you'll save a good amount on OC703 or equivalent instead of ordering online.

correct. sorry i wasn't more clear. remove old fabric and re-staple the printed.

just my opinion, but id advise against those frames with hardwood backings, unless you're mounting directly up against the wall.

also ... depends on the use, but if they're for broadband panels for early reflections i'd advise against full frames that wrap around the sides as you can induce edge diffraction (all can be verified with an ETC).
post #80 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by localhost127 View Post

correct. sorry i wasn't more clear. remove old fabric and re-staple the printed.

just my opinion, but id advise against those frames with hardwood backings, unless you're mounting directly up against the wall.

also ... depends on the use, but if they're for broadband panels for early reflections i'd advise against full frames that wrap around the sides as you can induce edge diffraction (all can be verified with an ETC).

OK, so bad idea to cover panel with art cloth over existing panel cloth.

Next question, I have an irregular room and from research I was planning on placing 3 panels on wall behind my couch which sits flush with wall. I probably should be fine with two but have seen art panels across 3 panels and they look good. I had been planning on placing 4" bass panels but Im having doubt wether I really need 4" and if 2" would be fine on a non corner wall. I understand that 4" absorbs more but I'm a little confused which one to use.

Also, what about spacing when placing panels against wall ? Should it be flush against wall or I should have some inches from wall ?

Thanks in advance
post #81 of 1197
4" will absorb more of the lower frequencies than 2" but 2" should be fine for non-corners. If you can space the panels from the wall that will also help absorb more of the lower frequencies. So if you do go with 2" panels and can provide some space between them and the walls you will be doing good.
post #82 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepyourgameup View Post
4" will absorb more of the lower frequencies than 2" but 2" should be fine for non-corners. If you can space the panels from the wall that will also help absorb more of the lower frequencies. So if you do go with 2" panels and can provide some space between them and the walls you will be doing good.
i disagree.

for absorbing early reflections, at least 4" OC703 (or equiv) with 4" air gap. 6" OC703 with 4-6" air gap if you can afford losing a bit more real estate.

you can verify all specular reflections are destroyed with an ETC graph (measured one speaker at a time).
post #83 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by spike9876 View Post
OK, so bad idea to cover panel with art cloth over existing panel cloth.

Next question, I have an irregular room and from research I was planning on placing 3 panels on wall behind my couch which sits flush with wall. I probably should be fine with two but have seen art panels across 3 panels and they look good. I had been planning on placing 4" bass panels but Im having doubt wether I really need 4" and if 2" would be fine on a non corner wall. I understand that 4" absorbs more but I'm a little confused which one to use.

Also, what about spacing when placing panels against wall ? Should it be flush against wall or I should have some inches from wall ?

Thanks in advance
you need to add as much absorption (sq area covered) as you need depending on how large your sweet spot/listening position needs to be.

for destroying specular reflections (first order reflections), 4" OC703 with 4" air gap should do the job, but measurements will tell you for certain.

since the rear wall is also a LF issue (nulls off the rear wall), 6" OC703 with 4-6" air gap should perform nicely.

read this for an understanding of how porous absorption works:
http://www.ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html

read it - it will probably save you time and money in the long wrong to take the time and understand what's going on re: porous absorption before blindly applying treatments.

Quote:
Also, what about spacing when placing panels against wall ? Should it be flush against wall or I should have some inches from wall
utilizing an air gap is about as close to a 'free lunch' as one can get in the real world. see the above link to understand why.
post #84 of 1197
Wow, a two feet of space (one foot per side) lost to absorption panels? Unless a person has a rather large room, the will look quite silly.
post #85 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by cybrsage View Post
Wow, a two feet of space (one foot per side) lost to absorption panels? Unless a person has a rather large room, the will look quite silly.
is the design requirement to get the room to sound good or to look good?
if you have another solution, then by all means please fill us in.

absorption is surgically applied - it's not like you're coating your entire wall
post #86 of 1197
Actually, it might be better to coat the entire wall, strictly from an aesthetic perspective. The appearance of random-looking giant rectangular lumps projecting far out from the walls and into the room has got to kill the chances for an Architectural Digest front cover.

Obviously, blanket coverage wouldn't work though (over-absorption, etc.).

It might help if we had some quick comparative reference numbers handy, contrasting the benefits of say, a 6" panel with 6" air gap vs. 4" panel with a 4" or a 2" air gap. Might help clarify for folks whether or not the greater loss of wall space depth would be worth the trade-off, knowing what their additional absorption gains would probably be.
post #87 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by CruelInventions View Post

Actually, it might be better to coat the entire wall, strictly from an aesthetic perspective.

Obviously, blanket coverage wouldn't work though (over-absorption, etc.).

You could coat the entire wall with cloth covered panel frames for a consistent look, but not put fiberglass in all of them to keep from over-absorbtion.
post #88 of 1197
interesting idea - could be a viable solution for those with large enough rooms to pull it off and can afford to lose the wall depth (if they care that much about the aesthetics).
post #89 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by localhost127 View Post

also ... depends on the use, but if they're for broadband panels for early reflections i'd advise against full frames that wrap around the sides as you can induce edge diffraction (all can be verified with an ETC).

what do you mean by full frames "that wrap around the sides"?
post #90 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by CruelInventions View Post

It might help if we had some quick comparative reference numbers handy, contrasting the benefits of say, a 6" panel with 6" air gap vs. 4" panel with a 4" or a 2" air gap. Might help clarify for folks whether or not the greater loss of wall space depth would be worth the trade-off, knowing what their additional absorption gains would probably be.

it's quite simple - one can always measure via ETC and increase thickness or air-gap until all specular reflections above -20dB within 20ms of original source are destroyed.
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