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Help Me Build Crites CS-1 Speakers

post #1 of 97
Thread Starter 
this is what i am trying to build.

http://www.critesspeakers.com/crites...r-project.html

so far, i have these parts ordered. the rest, i will get when bonus hit the bank.

http://www.parts-express.com/pe/psho...64-312&scqty=2

http://www.parts-express.com/pe/show...number=264-270

materials:

* 3/4" birch plywood

* Titebond wood glue http://www.homedepot.com/Titebond/h_...atalogId=10053

* woodscrew (i am thinking of the drywall type)?

i plan to cut the woods to specs, glued, clamp, and then screw?

am i missing anything? any suggestions?

thanks!
post #2 of 97
I think PL Premium is better than Titebond. It fills the gaps more and can give you a better seal.
post #3 of 97
smokarz -

I totally agree with the Fool above, man has that ever got me in trouble in the past ! But PL is very forgiving. It made my lack of wood skills while building my THT much easier.

Good luck with your build!


dbl
post #4 of 97
Wow, is that a rip off of the Econowave's?! Except this guy wants to charge people $200 for the crossover.
post #5 of 97
^ exactly what I was thinking. I've heard of this guy before. He charged a buddy of mine $250 to re-build some vintage klipsch cross overs! Claims he optimizes them. I'm pretty sure he just replaces the old dead caps. Who knows, possibly a redesign.
post #6 of 97
Thread Starter 
thanks guys, can i get this PL Premium from a Lowes or Home Depot?

also, i was planning to use sealant inside the box to close gaps? or is this overdo?
post #7 of 97
Smokarz - you may want to look into the e-waves first. But For either build, the PL inside along the seams should be fine by itself. Again, most are using it inside their massive sub enclosures with thousands of watts running through their cabs and the PL does fine alone.

dbl
post #8 of 97
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbldare View Post
Smokarz - you may want to look into the e-waves first. But For either build, the PL inside along the seams should be fine by itself. Again, most are using it inside their massive sub enclosures with thousands of watts running through their cabs and the PL does fine alone.

dbl
thanks.

i did look at the e-wave thread over at AK. very interesting, but believe or not i have a pair of vintage Klipsch speaker, and have heard that the CS runs very well with the Klipsch vintage. otherwise, i would have gone after the e-waves. honestly, they both look identical, except for the parts going into them.

also, what do you guys do to make sure the wood panels line up perfectly during assembly? do you build a frame to help assemble the cab?
post #9 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokarz View Post

thanks.

i did look at the e-wave thread over at AK. very interesting, but believe or not i have a pair of vintage Klipsch speaker, and have heard that the CS runs very well with the Klipsch vintage. otherwise, i would have gone after the e-waves. honestly, they both look identical, except for the parts going into them.

also, what do you guys do to make sure the wood panels line up perfectly during assembly? do you build a frame to help assemble the cab?

We get it close and just sand off the excess.
post #10 of 97
Thread Starter 
thanks.

running to HD today to get materials.

- PL Preium glue
- Clamps
- Screws
- Caulk (is this necessary to put around the drivers when attaching to cab?)

question, what do you guys pad the inside of your cab with? the pinky stuff?
post #11 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokarz View Post

...also, what do you guys do to make sure the wood panels line up perfectly during assembly? do you build a frame to help assemble the cab?

Make the panels 1/8" oversize, then use a flush-trim router bit to trim the excess.

I don't use jigs, but I do make 2 panels the exact internal size of the box. I use them when gluing up to keep everything square. These panels then become internal braces, back panels, or the back half of the front baffle.

Regarding internal treatments, there are a bunch of options. The most common are to fill a sealed box with acoustic fill, synthetic pillow stuffing or plain fiberglass insulation. The amount you add affects bass response, so you can add/remove to tune it, to some degree.

I would also strongly suggest adding braces between opposing panels, if none are present. This is a big speaker, so 1" hardwood dowel is a good choice. You'll want to brace in all 3 dimensions, but how many to add is up to you...

Have fun,
Frank
post #12 of 97
Thread Starter 
thanks, what is "bracing"? sorry, i am very new at this.

also, this is small speaker, i think. roughly 21" x 14" x 15"

the fill materials you mentioned, which are cheaper and easier to get?
post #13 of 97
You don't need and shouldn't put caulking or silicone on the back of the speaker before attaching it. If the driver didn't come with a gasket buy some 1/8" thick weatherstripping(black foam) that is sticky on one side and put that behind.
post #14 of 97
Thread Starter 
thanks, picked up the PL Premium stuff and some clamping brackets.

i tried to look for these screws for putting the wood panels together, and for attaching the drivers, but the HD folks had no idea what i am talking about.

* You need a 16 10-24 x 1-1/4" machine screws pan head
* You need a quantity of 34 10-24 x1-1/4" machine screws flat head


so what screws why i need for

1) screwing the wood panels
2) screwing the drivers (woofers & horns) to the motorboard
post #15 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokarz View Post

thanks, picked up the PL Premium stuff and some clamping brackets.

i tried to look for these screws for putting the wood panels together, and for attaching the drivers, but the HD folks had no idea what i am talking about.

* You need a 16 10-24 x 1-1/4" machine screws pan head
* You need a quantity of 34 10-24 x1-1/4" machine screws flat head


so what screws why i need for

1) screwing the wood panels
2) screwing the drivers (woofers & horns) to the motorboard

The HD guys didn't know how to tell which screws you needed? Really? That's pretty standard stuff. You're looking for 16 pieces of a #10 pan head machine screw with 24 threads per inch and is 1 1/4" long. Then you need 34 pieces of a #10 flat head machine screw that has 24 threads per inch and is 1 1/4" long. Go to the fasteners section and look at the packets of screws. You will see the info on the hooks they're hanging on. If you can't find someone at HD that knows what you need then you should get a manager. A guy that's working in hardware that doesn't know anything about screws is pretty bad. I would think you would need wood screws to join the cabinet together and use the others for mounting the drivers. Machine screws are usually for using with a nut.
post #16 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokarz View Post

thanks, what is "bracing"? sorry, i am very new at this.

also, this is small speaker, i think. roughly 21" x 14" x 15"

the fill materials you mentioned, which are cheaper and easier to get?

Bracing prevents cabinet resonance and prevents the cabinet from "adding" anything to the music. A lot of guys just use standard polyfill for their cabinets. It's super cheap stuff.
post #17 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokarz View Post

thanks, picked up the PL Premium stuff and some clamping brackets.

i tried to look for these screws for putting the wood panels together, and for attaching the drivers, but the HD folks had no idea what i am talking about.

* You need a 16 10-24 x 1-1/4" machine screws pan head
* You need a quantity of 34 10-24 x1-1/4" machine screws flat head


so what screws why i need for

1) screwing the wood panels
2) screwing the drivers (woofers & horns) to the motorboard

From the plans it looks like the screws(bolts) for #1 is to attach the front baffle. 10-24 is pretty much the same as a 3/16" machine bolt. So you need 16 of 3/16" machine bolts by 1 1/4" long.

For #2 to attach the drivers you need 34 of 3/16" by 1 1/4" machine bolts also.

My guess is that you need 3/16" T-nuts for these bolts to screw in to as machine bolts aren't made for screwing directly in to wood.

This is what a t-nut and bolt look like.
LL
post #18 of 97
Try a smaller hardware store for people who know what they are talking about. Rarely do you ever get knowledgable salespeople at HD or places like that.

Up Here we have Lee Valley where I go for fasteners for woodworking projects. If you have one where you live that's where I suggest you go.
post #19 of 97
Thread Starter 
sorry for all the questions, but i guess when you're dumb you just gotta ask.

more questions

1) can i use the dry wall screws to screw together the plywood? 1 5/8" coarse?

2) how do you guys typically install the drivers onto your cab? screw it in? or bolt it?

3) where can i get the polyfill?
post #20 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokarz View Post

sorry for all the questions, but i guess when you're dumb you just gotta ask.

more questions

1) can i use the dry wall screws to screw together the plywood? 1 5/8" coarse?

2) how do you guys typically install the drivers onto your cab? screw it in? or bolt it?

3) where can i get the polyfill?

I use drywall screws and the work fine if you're going to veneer or paint. If you're going to stain them then they'll be really visible where you've puttied over them. Polyfill is everywhere. WalMart, Target, JoAnn fabrics, etc. A lot of guys use the machine screws with the t-nut like the guy had in the picture above.
post #21 of 97
Thread Starter 
yeah, i would like to stain them though....

would the PL stuff be strong enough by itself to hold the cab together? or do i have to haves crews?
post #22 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokarz View Post

yeah, i would like to stain them though....

would the PL stuff be strong enough by itself to hold the cab together? or do i have to haves crews?

Yes. But you have to use clamps.
It held together my speakers and they were 500lbs of mdf and almost 7' tall.
post #23 of 97
Thread Starter 
ok, i just bought some clamps.....will these do?

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053
post #24 of 97
Yes those will do fine. You are best to use a piece of wood inbetween the clamp and your speaker so you dont damage it.
post #25 of 97
Thread Starter 
well, just got my horn and drivers delivered today.

Selenium HM25-25 and Selenium D220ti.
LL
post #26 of 97
Thread Starter 
questions on PL glue.

1) do i need to wear gloves?
2) how do i clean up the glue if they get on my hands/arms?
3) how do i remove spills if they get on the wood surface that i want to stain?

thanks!
post #27 of 97
You might want to talk to Bob about the filler. I'm going to build a pair of the CS-1 versions for some rear surrounds. He told me the sealed boxes don't need any acoustic treatment. Might be different for the ported enclosures.
A little bracing couldn't hurt though. Make sure you allow for the volume of the bracing in your calculations. Looks like you are going to beat me to the finish line. Let us know how they sound.
post #28 of 97
Thread Starter 
so you mean i need to make the box a little bigger for bracing?

didn't account for that.
post #29 of 97
I don't think a few pieces of rowel will make any difference.
post #30 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokarz View Post

questions on PL glue.

1) do i need to wear gloves?
2) how do i clean up the glue if they get on my hands/arms?
3) how do i remove spills if they get on the wood surface that i want to stain?

thanks!

Yes, definitely wear gloves. You can use paint thinner/mineral spirits to clean it up before it dries. After it dries it'll sand off no problem.
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