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Microsoft fires the first shot in the "NEXT" generation.... - Page 196  

post #5851 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post

That's a tautological argument since it's all a question of how you define the "marketplace." If the "marketplace" is everyone in the world, then you're right. If the "marketplace" is all people who play games, then you're wrong.

But based on this event, it's clear that MS is trying to expand how it defines the market for Xbox. But that's not how the other manufacturers are defining it. Like I said, it's a tautology.

Thank you for trying to argue semantics. rolleyes.gif I think it was pretty clear that I meant that MS is measuring the marketplace beyond core gamers. You also should probably understand the definition of the words you use in your argument before using them, twice, no less.
post #5852 of 7006
My take on the XBOX One: meh. I already have a HTPC and it works like a charm. Xbox I just use for hassle-free gaming.

I'll keep my 360 for a few more years and a few dozen more bargain bin titles. I've got several hundred (thousand?) hours of game-play left in this gen and the 360 still looks great on my 1080p.
post #5853 of 7006
Well, they just revealed the new Xbox, and rather than talking about all the awesome stuff they showed, the Internet is aflame with questions about used games, rentals, second accounts, and always online.

So, that went well, huh?

I can't believe they even opened those cans of worms.

I'm really surprised it doesn't have BC though. That could have been the one bright spot in an otherwise tone deaf presentation.
post #5854 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by coyote_5 View Post

Thank you for trying to argue semantics. rolleyes.gif I think it was pretty clear that I meant that MS is measuring the marketplace beyond core gamers. You also should probably understand the definition of the words you use in your argument before using them, twice, no less.

Sounds like someone just heard the word tautology for the first time and couldn't wait for the chance to use it in a sentence

Gaming hasn't been microsoft's main focus for quite a while with the 360. If you didn't see this coming you are blind.
post #5855 of 7006
http://www.engadget.com/2013/05/21/building-xbox-one-an-inside-look/#continued

excerpts:

The engineers in Microsoft's windowless next-gen Xbox silicon lab are rattled. And understandably so. We're in their office, after all, and we have a mess of cameras in the one place you're not allowed to have cameras (or even cellphones). We're obviously outsiders on Microsoft's multi-building, security-heavy Mountain View campus, especially given our quartet of esteemed escorts: Todd Holmdahl, Ilan Spillinger, Nick Baker and Greg Williams. These four gentlemen are leading the charge on both Microsoft's next big thing and, perhaps more importantly, a major effort to internalize silicon architecture at the traditionally software-focused megacorp.

It's really just a single chip that's causing concern: a custom-built Microsoft SoC that sits at the heart of the Xbox One. It's this SoC that has us in Mountain View, Calif. -- in Silicon Valley, literally down the road from Google -- a mere five days before Microsoft will unveil its next game console to the world. Over six hours last Friday, we learned not just about that SoC, but also how the company plans to utilize it in the new console. We spoke with its four lead hardware architects. We toured the labs where they are testing the silicon, and where the next-generation Kinect was born. What follows is more than a look behind the silicon that drives the next Xbox -- it's a deep dive into the changing approach Microsoft's taking to creating devices.

In the first Xbox, Intel and NVIDIA crafted the silicon. In the case of Xbox 360, it was more of a joint effort between Microsoft and ATI / IBM. Though Microsoft's still working with AMD to build out some of its chips this time around, it's also invested millions of dollars in building out verification facilities (among others) on-site in Mountain View and doubling the amount of in-house engineering dedicated to silicon. Holmdahl explains:

"In the consumer space, to control your destiny, you can't just rely on commodity components. You have to be able to make your own silicon. It helps with performance; it helps with the cost; it helps make your product smaller; it helps you create your own IP (always a good thing). I'll argue you're a lot more flexible -- you're not relying on somebody else's schedule; you make your own. So we're obviously heading that way. The stuff we've done over the last 13, 14 years is one example of that within Microsoft. And you're gonna see more and more of that, is my guess, as you go forward."

For now, silicon's a teensy component of Microsoft. Of the company's approximately 95,000 employees, the silicon team is around 200 people, or roughly 0.2 percent of the total workforce. Double that if you count the system engineers working on next-gen gaming hardware -- the console, Kinect and accessories -- and that's still nothing compared to most dedicated chipmakers. Intel employs over 100,000 people, for instance, while NVIDIA employs around 7,000.

However small, Mountain View's 200-person team has been working heads-down for the past several years to verify its silicon architecture and get it "first time right." That's not to say that the chip returns perfect from manufacturing, but that it doesn't run into any major issues -- of course, there's a small team within the larger group that's dedicated to debugging. As Xbox Hardware Group Lead Holmdahl points out, "One transistor can mess up your day really badly," setting the team back months to try and isolate the issue. Unlike software development, you can't quickly (or cheaply) iterate on silicon implementation. Worse, the equivalent of "debugging" is a guesswork process. "The fewer times you have to redo it, the faster you can put your product on the market," Holmdahl adds, with a nod to the business logic that also drives that need for "first time right."

"We booted the OS within days of getting the SoC back," Williams says; a good indicator their initial architecture design wasn't tremendously off. "I'm proud to say that, in our schedule, we didn't have any major showstoppers.

Powering the living room of the (near) future: 'Xbox On'

In-house silicon is at the core of what makes the Xbox One tick. It provides the structure that enables the console to run two operating systems at once for instant multitasking, and for the new Kinect to dish out much more information than before (to the tune of 2 Gbps). Most importantly, the five pieces of custom silicon spread across the console and its new camera peripheral helped the Mountain View team support their vision of an "always-on" console. Rather than use your hands to turn it on like a baby's toy, simply saying "Xbox On" will immediately wake the new Xbox.

"The box will pop on and come to your home page or wherever you were last. In order to do that in an efficient way, you have to architect all of that into the box up front. A lot of it is in the SoC," Holmdahl says. That SoC contains both the CPU and GPU, as well as embedded ESRAM; the first two components are based on an AMD design, and custom-built into an SoC with embedded ESRAM. That CPU is based on the Jaguar design from AMD, with eight cores and a 4MB L2 cache, while the GPU is of the D3D11.1 (with extensions) variety, Baker told us.

The console runs in multiple power states, which means it runs in a low-wattage setting when not in use. (Microsoft wouldn't give us specifics other than to say, "The system is designed for an SoC up to about 100W, but will vary on the scenario.")

"If you look at the instant app-switching, if you look at multiple OSes, if you look at power consumption -- that placed a lot of the main constraints on what we did on the silicon," Baker tells us. Some of the silicon design was derived from data center concepts, as that was the only parallel in computing available. "You're trying to make that technology seamless for the living room. It doesn't mean we need 64-bit CPU architecture. We're talking about many, many cores so you can run these tasks in parallel. We wanted to be able to support 8GB [of RAM] out of the chute, to probably support virtualization, which is what you need for running multiple operating systems. That's just a lot of making sure you have the right security systems in place so things don't stomp on each other."

In-house silicon also powers the other crucial component driving Microsoft's vision for the Xbox One: the new Kinect. Improved cameras and acoustics, not to mention a sleeker form factor, are all nice changes; it's discussing the new CMOS sensor's processor, however, that gets Spillinger, a passionate, intense gentleman (whose lovable accent sadly doesn't translate to text), visibly giddy.

"The highlight of the story is the CMOS sensor, which we developed internally," Spillinger says. "This design was done completely, 100 percent on this site. This is brand-new technology. There is discontinuity between this technology and the first Kinect; from the technology perspective that we are using for depth, for 3D measurement. So this was done here. On this one, this was a complete Microsoft custom design, where our engagement is directly with the manufacturer. It's not with any third party. We did the work. We do the qualification of the parts. We do the validation of the parts. We have done everything on this one."

If it isn't clear enough from that, he is a beaming father when it comes to the next generation of Kinect. And yes, you read that right -- your old Kinect won't work with the Xbox One.

Spillinger joined Microsoft just as the company was beginning work on the first Kinect (then "Project Natal"). He hailed from IBM, where he led the team that created the Xbox 360's CPU. At the time (early '08), he thought he was joining the Xbox hardware team to get started on a next-generation gaming console.

"First I was the design architect in Intel, then a design manager at IBM, and when I joined Microsoft, the view was 'Okay, it's about time -- early '08 -- to start to think about the next gen,'" he says. "It didn't take us five and a half years to get there, because what happened is that the moment sort of turned around and we started development of Kinect. The entire focus was about shipping Kinect, which now, if you in retrospect see, is such a great success."

The first Kinect did indeed sell very, very well for Microsoft -- 24 million as of this past February. Microsoft's decision to refocus on a new Kinect with much-improved audio recognition makes sense -- many users employ the first model solely as a HAL 9000-like order-taker. Beyond "improved acoustic models," Holmdahl says the new Kinect can track whoever is speaking using a "beam array" on the video side, which works with the audio side. It can identify, "exactly who is talking, and then be able to subtract out other people in the room so you get a really clear audio signal into your box." As time goes on, he promises that Microsoft will push out improvements to voice recognition and commands, and, "At some point, we'll be able to have conversational understanding."

If that isn't HAL, what is?

Inside the Silicon lab

In one corner, a massive 4K television is seamlessly playing two HD video streams from a single box. Though the Xbox One is capable of pushing and receiving 4K signals, this test station is an illustration of how Microsoft's architecture went into the console's SoC (not a demonstration of its raw power). Spillinger said that the new console's ability to decode multiple HD streams at once is a measure of his team demanding specific silicon design from third-party partners.

"When we talk about the SoC and the general-purpose SoCs out there, this is per our requirement," Spillinger tells us while we huddle around the station. "This is our aggressiveness to have two HD streams being compressed, decompressed. It's actually a parallel circuit, it's not part of the CPU / GPU -- it's an add-on."

Making a fake video game console

Principal Design Verification Engineer Padma Parthasarathy has a bowl full of M&Ms on her desk, right next to the door, which she invites guests to indulge in. Next to that, her computer is running a software virtualization of a game console. And that's her job -- as "principal design verification engineer" -- to verify whether or not all the bits and pieces of the chips driving Microsoft's next Xbox are working as they should be. It's part of the ongoing process the company's set up to create its own silicon, and it's an important step. Without people like Parthasarathy, chip development could go from a few years to a decade or more. She is yet another fail-safe in the endless quest for "first time right."

In her little office, on a standard desktop computer, the logic behind the Xbox One is running -- from a server farm on campus -- through a variety of test scenarios. She can log issues on hardware that doesn't exist yet, essentially troubleshooting a game console being faked by software on a server farm (its components, anyway). Given the complex nature of the virtualization, tests can only be processed at a fraction of actual run speed, but it's still one of the best ways to troubleshoot hardware ahead of mass-producing millions of units.

Parthasarathy's time with Williams and others on the team goes all the way back to the 3DO. "She has been the architect of the verification team for all of these years," he tells us as we leave for another part of campus. She's been with Microsoft since 1998, when Microsoft absorbed her team (and Williams') in an acquisition. It's people like Parthasarathy that are helping bridge the gap between the company's old approach to gaming hardware and its future.

The next step in faking a game console requires a giant machine that needs its own HVAC system, of course. The spaceship-like device originates with Cadence Design Systems, and serves to run a variety of processor emulations. A peek into its innards reveals all sorts of hoses and wires, akin to opening a panel on a Willy Wonka candy machine; an even larger machine sits outside the building, powering its test conditions. Our friend the dolphin shows up once more on a monitor displaying what the emulator is up to, but his movement is imperceptible due to the speed of the emulation. Next up is a significantly smaller lab with what looks like a standalone meat locker. The meat locker has a manned workstation in front of it, where one very unlucky engineer spends his time logging issues registered by the consoles being tested within.

The virtual console becomes reality

When Holmdahl lifts the dark cloth off a black, rectangular box, a gamepad and the new Kinect, it's the first time some of his own colleagues have seen the final designs. Not a beta kit with zebra tape, or a mockup, but a presentation-ready prototype. As we stand around the hardware placed on a little circular table, the concept of the box "slipping into the home entertainment center" is mentioned. The Xbox One is no "inhale" -- it looks like a little computer with a slot for discs. It's got a two-tone finish of alternating black matte and gloss, with a slot-loading Blu-ray disc drive and its power button greeting users out front. It's ... well, it's not such a looker. At least not thus far -- anything could change by the time it ships, though it seems doubtful the form factor will change dramatically.

Kinect also got a visual makeover, and looks the nicest for the revisions. For starters, only one eye glares at you from the front, and the new chassis is a clean update to a clunky, aging peripheral. Unlike the Johnny Five-esque look of the original Kinect, the second version deserves the prime placement in living rooms that it demands.

The five

"In different levels, we were working on five custom-designed components. Silicon components. Three of them going to the console and two of them to the sensor," Spillinger explains. That's the SoC that drives the console, the CMOS processor in the new Kinect, I/O integrators in both Kinect and the console, and a digital signal processor on the Blu-ray drive. For the four gentlemen who show us around the Mountain View campus and scads of others we don't meet, getting to the point where so much of that silicon was designed and verified in-house is the fruition of years of work.

It's a major shift away from the company's past reliance on external partners, with only AMD serving as collaborator this time around. And like any game console launch, it's another huge investment for the next... five, eight, 10 years? That's an unknown, of course, but it seems likely based on history that we'll have the Xbox One for the foreseeable future. Whatever the future dictates, it looks like we'll see internally developed chips in many of Microsoft's products going forward.
post #5856 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by rolltide1017 View Post

Well aren't you a saint!

I'm sick and tired of this stupid argument. Wasn't it just recently announced that the gaming industry made more money then Hollywood. These studios aren't hurting for money and if they are, it's from poor management, not used game sales. Also, it is not apples to oranges when comparing the used game market to other used markets like cars or better yet, cds and DVDs/BDs. The game industry needs to get over itself and realize that people want cheaper options in the form of used games or rentals. They also want to be able to sell back the hundreds of crappy games that these studios release to recover a little of the original investment cost, instead of throwing it in the trash.

While I wouldn't mind if they made the games less expensive, I have no problems paying what I do for the handful of games I buy each year. Also, don't you think not having used games will basically make sure those "hundreds of crappy games" won't be made going forward? As I said before, this will help the big titles/studios - which hopefully equates to better games going forward (at least that is what I hope for). Hell, the smaller studios that make really good games will benefit the most from more people buying full priced versions, or "on sale" versions.

Trim the fat biggrin.gif
post #5857 of 7006
Day one purchase. Let people complain, none of the issues others are having bother me at all. Excited for its abilities to make using my electronics easier for everyone in the house. The games will be displayed in a few weeks and I can wait for that. I really think this is going to be a great system. Love the look of it, thankfully it doesn't look like a kids toy and well blend into my system. Improved controller sounds interesting as well.
post #5858 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by mboojigga View Post

Who gives a sh*t? We're we expecting journalist who are typing and recording for there respective websites to drop everything and clap? They had MS employees their so nothing surprising. He only pointed this out because someone asked the question to him.
They did at the Sony event... back in 2004 many Journalists were brought to tears at the Nintendo E3 show. So yes, I expect game journalists to react.
post #5859 of 7006
I'm not saying that SoC isn’t important to MS or their future competiveness in the tablet, mobile, and PC marketplace; especially with the places it’s currently trending. But that SoC is the core hardware running the XBOne is ludicrous. AMD’s beefy APU is the engine in the machine, and any SoC solutions only serve to offload processes from the APU so it can focus on what it needs to do. Play games, render services, ect.

This sort of reeks of Sony in 05/06 taking their eye off the ball, where other areas of the company start pushing their way into the one that is working to ineffectively synergize by taking control, rather than figuring out ways to develop in tandem.

SoC ain't going to sell many Xboxes and it's wierd that this is the PR / article they're putting out. lets get a look at that APU!
post #5860 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by PENDRAG0ON View Post

They did at the Sony event... back in 2004 many Journalists were brought to tears at the Nintendo E3 show. So yes, I expect game journalists to react.

Good point. Never forget:

Must have been all the console-as-HTPC journalists attending, right?
post #5861 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by TyrantII View Post

Typically I never buy big publisher named games unless I really feel a need to support the Developer, as they make plenty of money as is. I always buy smaller dev games and those from the best (IMO) devs.

I made 6 video poker apps for iphone/ipad. Sales are not so hot, search for leffsoft in the appstore.

Thanks!
post #5862 of 7006
I am flip flopping on how I feel about this reveal. I don't care for kinect, so it sucks that it is required to run. I don't buy used games but will trade in some, but the idea of launching any game I want at any time sounds great. I don't see the point in all the tv stuff. I doubt I would actually run it through my xbox. With that said, Sony stayed pretty quiet on the used game fee front, and also stayed quiet on if there will be a fee live XBL.
post #5863 of 7006
So - the preferred abbreviation will be XBO or XB1?? Inquiring minds want to know...
post #5864 of 7006
http://gizmodo.com/the-new-xbox-everything-you-need-to-know-about-microso-509033619

excerpts:

New Controls

The console turns on just from you saying "Xbox on". It will launch into what you were doing last. This passive listening is a huge deal for natural interface. It seems incredibly responsive in the demo, but for now it's unclear if this is an actual demo or if it's being simulated.

It also integrates right into your TV. "Xbox, watch TV" drops you right into a live television feed. The amazing part of this is that you can switch quickly from movies, TV, games, a browser or anything else, just by saying "Xbox, go to", or even just "Go to movies".



Two at Once

You can also use Windows 8's snap mode (with one app "snapped" to the side of the screen" to run another app on the side of the screen while your movie, or TV or game is playing. This is kind of an amazing addition, not just for browsing movies while watching one, like an onscreen IMDB, which is what the demo is showing, but you can also, say, snap a walkthrough for a game you're playing.

Oh, and Skype! You can use Skype while watching a movie or playing a game, too.

Watching TV

Or! You can go to ESPN to watch sports ("Xbox, go to ESPN"), and get update cards in the top of your screen whenever one of your fantasy team scores or accumulates other stats (or just snap in the full panel).

Microsoft also added its own TV guide, with full voice Kinect voice controls (which seem FAR more accurate than current Kinect voice controls in this demo). You can go to any channel or program by telling the Xbox to go to it, or you can just go to a Trending page with the most popular content.

Hardware

There are three ways the Xbox One is upgraded. Hardware and new architecture, the new accessories like Kinect and SmartGlass, and a new Xbox Live.

Kinect is "complete redesigned" to respond to you and your voice, and is made to be more conversational. It picks up motion at 13 billionths of a second, the time it takes light photons to bounce off of you and make it back for the sensors.

New Kinect

The new Kinect has a 1080p sensor, and captures videos at 60fps and far finer detection. It detects the twist of a wrist, or how balanced you are. it can read your heartbeat while watching you exercise. This is next level stuff. The sensor field is expanded by 60 percent, and uses a modulated IR beam, and uses "time-of-flight" tech to measure the time it takes photos to travel back to the Kinect. Microsoft claims it works in complete darkness.

The controller has a ton of new features, too, like the ability for designers to send feedback right into the triggers.

SmartGlass also gets a ton of upgrades, because it's going to be treated as a native part of the platform, and not just an add-on, as it previously was.

Xbox Live is getting a massive overhaul as well. It currently runs on 15,000 servers, but it's going to go to 300,000 this year. Insane. You'll be able to access your movies, music, games, and saves from anywhere. The Xbox One is NOT always online. But developers will be able to use Microsoft's Azure computing (perform rendering tasks remotely), which would require even single player games to be online if those are used. Those aren't mandatory, but Microsoft hopes developers use them.

It also seems the new online gaming feature will restrict your ability to use used games, since they will be tied to your specific used Xbox Live account once activated online. [The official Xbox One FAQ starts off with the "always-on" DRM issue and also addresses used games, indicating that the box is designed "so you can play games and watch Blu-ray movies and live TV if you lose your connection," and that it does not have to always be connected. Other questions answer things like whether the new console will require more power (no) and will our Xbox Live Gold subscriptions still work with the new and old hardware (yes). When it comes to used games, the FAQ's response is also promising, stating "We are designing Xbox One to enable customers to trade in and resell games."]

It will have a native editing and sharing DVR tool to snap highlights of your gameplay, and share them. Matchmaking is also more advanced, to hopefully make sure you're not repeatedly sent up against the same jerk who wipes out your whole party before they even get out of the APC. And it's going even further globally, so hopefully bring in more people to the games (though it's unclear how latency plays into this).

EA Partnership

EA's making an effort to use the new innovations from Microsoft and Xbox Live especially with a roster of new titles. FIFA 14, Madden 25, NBA Live 14, and UFC will all launch in the next 12 months, and EA promises that they will all change the way you play. They'll be powered by a new game engine called EA Sports Ignite, unveiled today.

EA Sports Ignite is supposed to make decision making and contextual contact more realistic. It will supposedly have 10 times more animation detail, called "True Player Motion", and the crowds are 3D, with dynamic sidelines. Basically, everything's going to look even more realistic.

Oh, and FIFA 14's Ultimate Team mode, the most popular mode, is exclusive to the new Xbox.

Exclusive Games

Obviously, there will be some exclusive games through Microsoft Studios. It will release 15 games in the first year of the Xbox One, eight of which will be brand new franchises. Microsoft is trying to focus on new ways to play games. We got to see Forza Motorsport 5 running on the Xbox One, and the reflections, textures of the materials, and lighting looked awesome, but driving game eye porn always looks great in the cinematic cuts.

We also got a look at a new game from Remedy, responsible for the Max Payne series, called Quantum Break. It will let the choices you make affect the entire world around you. The preview was deeply confusing, with some adults talking to a little girl, a cut to a boat tearing through a bridge, the tagline "Time is the fire", and a character landing in the wreckage.

All Call of Duty downloadable content (DLC) will launch first on Xbox One.

(EA also showed new Call of Duty Ghosts features, which you can check out in full over at Kotaku, but let us just say YOU GET YOUR OWN WAR DOG WHO FOLLOWS YOU AROUND. A WAR DOG. FOR YOU. YOUR WAR DOG.)

Original Xbox Content

Xbox One wants to be immersive, personal (with smart recommendations), and social. The Studios are going to use the immersive capabilities to do new stuff with comedy, drama, sports, and all the rest of the stuff you watch on TV. It's starting with Halo.

343 Studios announced a new live-action HALO TV show created by Steven Speilberg. So, like, holy holy holy crap. Microsoft and 343 promise this will be a premium show, on par with Game of Thrones, which is mighty big talk, but we'll see.

There's also a new NFL partnership with exclusive content for the Xbox, but it seems like some in-depth fantasy stats and the ability to use natively formatted apps next to live broadcasts. Nice, but not as groundbreaking as Microsoft is making it out to be.

The New Future

This is what we were hoping Microsoft would show us. We saw a new and massively updated Kinect. New game engines, with improved graphics (but still such cold, dead eyes). There are new entertainment, and even some original content. Some issues, like backwards compatibility and streaming games, we hope will be cleared up throughout the day of events.

The Xbox One will be available "later this year," which almost certainly means in time for the holiday shopping season. For some frame of reference, the Xbox 360 was announced in May of 2005 and went on sale six months later.
post #5865 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

Well, they just revealed the new Xbox, and rather than talking about all the awesome stuff they showed, the Internet is aflame with questions about used games, rentals, second accounts, and always online.

So, that went well, huh?

I can't believe they even opened those cans of worms.

I'm really surprised it doesn't have BC though. That could have been the one bright spot in an otherwise tone deaf presentation.

What awesome stuff? You saw a non-game centric marketing talk with little details on anything. Was any of the media, cloud, TV or Kinect stuff a surprise? I could have wrote that script based on the last 2-3 years of 360 history. As an adult gamer that does not have cable and doesn't want to talk to my console, I saw very little. I guess E3 will have more, but this presentation is getting blasted all over the net because it sucks, no conspiracy.
post #5866 of 7006
http://gizmodo.com/xbox-one-can-switch-to-live-tv-with-a-simple-voice-comm-509063759

excerpts:

Xbox One Could the Best Friend Your TV Ever Had

Xbox One is making TV watching awesome. It's an incredible multitasker that can do the things your regular old remote does better, along with voice and gesture controls. But that's just the beginning.

Watching TV

To turn the console on, all you have to say is "Xbox, on." It never gets harder than that. Want to watch TV? Say "Xbox, watch TV," and it drops you right into a live TV feed. Want to listen to music or even watch movies? Say "play music" or "Xbox, go to movies."

However, you can't cancel cable just yet. Watching live TV works through an HDMI pas-through, wherein the cable box or satellite box connects directly to the Xbox One, and then passes the signal to the console through an HDMI-out port. And because of the cable box pairing, you can get TV with as much or as little Xbox as you'd like. Want to use your normal remote? Fine. Want to swap over to Microsoft's entertainment guide and use voice and gesture controls? You can do that, too.

OneGuide

Microsoft created a completely new, interactive guide for Xbox One that has full Kinect voice controls. To see it just say say "Xbox, show the guide." From here, again, you can speak the name of the show or network you want to see, or you can search by actor name, time slot, or genre. If you want to go home, say "go home," or go to a Trending page to see what's most popular on TV. It's like the ultimate remote that isn't even a remote—insanely simple to use and to do things you actually want to do.

Original Content

What else? A live-action, premium Halo TV series created in partnership with Steven Speilberg, 343 Industries, and Xbox Studios. Holy crap! We don't know a lot of details here, but we are certainly familiar with Speilberg.

Sports

Microsoft has also teamed up with the NFL to let you play fantasy football right while you're watching the game live on television. Want to taunt an opponent? You can use Snap Mode to make a braggadocios Skype call during the game as you're getting updates on your fantasy team.
post #5867 of 7006
I really wish MS would have found a way to squeeze BC into this thing. I have a ton of 360 games yet to play. In spite of all that I don't like about this thing I probably would've convinced myself to get it.
post #5868 of 7006
I'm not too excited about this console. It just doesn't have the same mass appeal that the previous generation consoles had when initially revealed.

If this were revealed as strictly a gaming console with future proof components, then I would've started saving my money right away. Rather than having a good console we are presented with a device that manages to be "mediocre" at everything it's trying to do.
post #5869 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlysublime View Post

http://gizmodo.com/xbox-one-can-switch-to-live-tv-with-a-simple-voice-comm-509063759

What else? A live-action, premium Halo TV series created in partnership with Steven Speilberg, 343 Industries, and Xbox Studios. Holy crap! We don't know a lot of details here, but we are certainly familiar with Speilberg.
So familiar they can't spell the guy's name, or look it up?
post #5870 of 7006























post #5871 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgable View Post

What awesome stuff? You saw a non-game centric marketing talk with little details on anything. Was any of the media, cloud, TV or Kinect stuff a surprise? I could have wrote that script based on the last 2-3 years of 360 history. As an adult gamer that does not have cable and doesn't want to talk to my console, I saw very little. I guess E3 will have more, but this presentation is getting blasted all over the net because it sucks, no conspiracy.

I guess the sarcasm wasnt thick enough? tongue.gif

I'm with you 100%. That reveal was a disaster.
post #5872 of 7006
So is the front panel actually two different textures or materials, one on the left one on the right? Seems like it is more reflective on the right (when facing it) panel.
post #5873 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by coyote_5 View Post

Thank you for trying to argue semantics. rolleyes.gif I think it was pretty clear that I meant that MS is measuring the marketplace beyond core gamers.
Which is why your point didn't make sense. To say the console "marketplace" has shifted only makes sense because MS is actively attempting to shift it. It's like saying "Boy, it sure is getting hot in this house!" when I'm the one who turned the heat on.
Quote:
You also should probably understand the definition of the words you use in your argument before using them, twice, no less.
Now who's arguing semantics? rolleyes.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucwylde23 View Post

Gaming hasn't been microsoft's main focus for quite a while with the 360. If you didn't see this coming you are blind.
That's exactly the point. Everyone saw this coming. There wasn't a single surprise. We all were hoping to be at least pleasantly surprised with something gaming related. Instead we got a bunch of TV-tech, smartphone integration, NFL tie ins, web series announcements, a CG trailer, and one of the most ludicrously inane game tech "comparisons" I've ever seen.
post #5874 of 7006
I'll buy it as long as it's at least comparable to the PS4 in terms of gaming power and similar price (and I've been with Xbox since day one). The interface looks nice, but I can already do all of those things already. If the PS4 is notably more powerful I'll easily switch to Sony.
post #5875 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlysublime View Post


















it seems like it really matters how the light hits the console and the controller. it goes from gray to black.
post #5876 of 7006
Microsoft Support is saying Wired misunderstood the used game stuff and that there is no fee.

https://twitter.com/XboxSupport/status/336933801517260800

anyone making any snap decisions about the console today are being way too reactionary. There will be games aplenty at e3. All these confusing things will be ironed out and more clear in the months before release.

I, for one, liked what I saw. Still have reservations about the used game stuff, but I'll wait and see how that plays out.
post #5877 of 7006
for me personally i will be passing until there is a large price drop or they announce games i just have to have. there was nothing announced today that got me excited at all about the new console. i could not possibily care less about the NFL fantasy stuff, or the TV stuff as i watch so little TV anyway. I already have a HTPC and 3 other BR players that can connect to pretty much any online service. COD is crap. i really dont care about kinnect or voice controlls.

i think im just getting too old to care
post #5878 of 7006
I will say, that is one sexy controller. I have always loved the feel of the Xbox controller over the Dual Shock. I guess we will all just have to wait for E3. I knew they wouldn't show many games from listening to Major Nelson's podcast, but I was hoping for at least some game play footage.
post #5879 of 7006
http://www.zdnet.com/microsofts-xbox-one-whats-windows-got-to-do-with-it-7000015684/

excerpts:

Microsoft officials told Wired.com back in April something similar. From the Wired story:

"The Xbox One simultaneously runs three separate operating systems. First comes the tiny Host OS, which boots the machine and then launches two other hard-partitioned systems: the Shared partition, an environment that runs any apps (Skype, Live TV, Netflix, etc.) and helps provide processing power for the Kinect sensor and its gesture and voice controls; and the Exclusive partition, which is where games run. Because of the way memory is apportioned in the Shared partition, you can switch between apps with little to no load times, and even snap them into another app or game to use both at the same time."

Before today's Xbox event, Windows SuperSite's Paul Thurrott had said the next Xbox was built on top of the Windows 8 core. If I were a betting woman, I'd guess the Shared partition described in the Wired piece is based on the Windows NT kernel.

The NT "core" is what's shared across Windows 8, Windows RT, Windows Server 2012 and Windows Phone 8. It includes a shared file system (NTFS), networking stack, security elements, graphics engine (DirectX), device driver framework and hardware abstraction layer (HAL).

Dave Cutler, the father of Windows NT, moved to the Xbox team from the Windows Azure team a couple of years ago. At the same time, Hoi Vo also moved from Azure to Xbox. Vo was the director of OS/hypervisor on Windows Azure. So maybe Ho and/or Cutler had something to do with the "host OS" mentioned in the Wired story? (Just a guess on my part, as Microsoft so far isn't commenting on the Xbox One OS guts beyond what I've mentioned above.)

Update: In an under-the-hood architecture panel following the Xbox One reveal, Boyd Multerer, Director of Development for Xbox, confirmed that the team started with Microsoft's Hyper-V hypervisor in building the Xbox One operating system. Multerer said the team stripped out all the general-purpose "goop" to create an OS that allowd two virtual machines to run in side-by-side partitions. One of the partitions runs apps; the other runs games.

"David Cutler built the hypervisor that does the switching back and forth," Multerer confirmed.

The new Xbox One interface looks quite similar to the Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 one, with a tiled look and feel. It runs Internet Explorer and Skype, just like any Windows PC/device. Also like Windows 8, the Xbox One includes snapping support. Microsoft officials demonstrated during the Xbox reveal how users will be able to "snap" applications, movies and games allowing them to multitask.

Another Windows 8 similarity: Xbox One is optimized to work in different power states, depending on the game or application that's running. The console remains in a low-power state so that when a user says "Xbox On," it will be able to power up quickly. This sounds a lot like Connected Standy in Windows 8.

Microsoft officials also mentioned Windows Azure during today's Xbox One reveal. Xbox Live does not run on Windows Azure; it runs on its own servers in Microsoft's datacenters. When Xbox Live launched in 2002, Xbox Live required 500 servers. It now requires 15,000. By the time Xbox One launches this holiday season, Micorsoft officials said it will be running across 300,000 servers.

We do know that the Halo game team at Microsoft has used a new cloud-programming model, codenamed "Orleans," which was developed by Microsoft Research. And during today's Xbox One reveal, the Redmondians noted that users will be able to store their movies, music, games and saves "in the cloud," which I am assuming means on Windows Azure.

The aforementioned Wired piece states defnitively that "Xbox One gives game developers the ability to access Microsoft’s Azure cloud computing platform." Microsoft officials didn't say that today during the Xbox reveal event. However, Microsoft didn't say anything about the developer story for Xbox One today, presumably because that is going to be a big part of the messaging at the company's Build 2013 conference at the end of June.

Even without knowing (yet) what Microsoft will say at Build, it's becoming clear the company is edging closer to having a true cross-Windows development strategy at long last -- and that Xbox One is one of the devices that will be part of it.
post #5880 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by americangunner View Post

I will say, that is one sexy controller. I have always loved the feel of the Xbox controller over the Dual Shock. I guess we will all just have to wait for E3. I knew they wouldn't show many games from listening to Major Nelson's podcast, but I was hoping for at least some game play footage.
Definitely like the smaller form factor. And it looks like the d-pad got an improvement (no more sloppy circle).
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