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Microsoft fires the first shot in the "NEXT" generation.... - Page 199  

post #5941 of 7006
http://www.engadget.com/2013/05/21/xbox-one-used-games/#continued

excerpts:

With each subsequent console generation there's an undercurrent of fear, a concern that this will be the cycle that finally kills off something many hold near and dear: the used game.

With the announcement of the current next-generation of consoles the discontent raised again. Is the axe about to drop on the used video game market? Is this the iteration that will prevent you from borrowing something from a friend? Not if Microsoft has anything to say about it. The Xbox One does support used games and it does support game sharing -- but the details are in some cases a bit murky.

#1 - Buying and selling of used games is supported

Yes, you can play used games. Yes, you can buy used games and, therefore, it's reasonable to conclude that you can sell them too. It was postulated that you would have to pay some sort of activation fee to Microsoft to re-enable those used games, but Microsoft seems to be trying to dispel that thought. Exactly how it works still remains to be seen. "It's going to be different than the way we currently do it," Albert Penello, senior director of product planning at Microsoft told us. "We'll get into more specifics later."

#2 - Games are installed in the background while you play

Just pop the disc in and start playing and the game will start installing while you play. No need to hit the Y button and go through any other theatrics.

#3 - You can play installed games without the disc

Sick of sitting through the full game install on the Xbox 360, only to still have to get up and put the disc in every time you want to play it? So was everyone at Microsoft, as it turns out. "That feature, the ability to play games off the hard drive, was one of the first things we wrote down when we started to talk about next-gen," said Penello. So, yes, once you install the game, you can put the disc on the shelf and forget about it. But, presumably, you can't just sell the disc and still keep playing the game.

So, how does that work? At a minimum, each game disc must have some sort of unique ID associated to your account. "Your Xbox account will tie you to your game," said Penello. That ID must, therefore, be somehow disassociated from your account before you can sell the thing. Unfortunately, this is where things start getting murky. "We'll get into more specifics later," Penello told us again, a common chant that hopefully will change when we get to E3 in a few weeks time.

#4 - You can download games that were purchased on disc

Here's an interesting situation. What happens if you want to play a game you own on a friends console? You will, Penello says, have "the ability to go over to your friends house, download your save game, or even download your game to his Xbox and pick up where you left off." So, not only will your game saves be stored in the cloud, your entire game library will be and you'll be able to download it from anywhere.

#5 - Offline gameplay is supported

That all your game saves are in the cloud is a nice step forward, but what if you're offline? Can you still access those game saves? Can you still play your games? Yes, you can. Games will work offline without an issue and game saves will sync transparently when you reconnect, Penello told us. However, some games that make use of Microsoft's online services may not be playable offline. That will be up to developers.

#6 - You can share games with those in your "household"

Another use-case we threw Penello's way: what if your spouse or child signs in to the family's Xbox One and wants to play a game that is associated with your account? Will they have to buy it themselves? "Certainly we've accounted for family members in the household being able to play games." Exactly how? That, again, remains to be seen. Only 19 days until E3...

also see http://www.avsforum.com/t/1320468/microsoft-fires-the-first-shot-in-the-next-generation/5910#post_23341383
post #5942 of 7006
http://kotaku.com/you-will-be-able-to-trade-xbox-one-games-online-micros-509140825
Quote:
"The bits that are on that disc, you can give it to your friend and they can install it on an Xbox One," he said. "They would then have to purchase the right to play that game through Xbox Live."

"They would be paying the same price we paid, or less?" we asked.

"Let’s assume it’s a new game, so the answer is yes, it will be the same price," Harrison said.

There you have it. Microsoft corporate vice president Phil Harrison says you have to pay full price to activate the game on a friends machine. He also said in the article that you can only sell used games online through Live somehow.
post #5943 of 7006
Here's how the system works: when you buy an Xbox One game, you'll get a unique code that you enter when you install that game. You'll have to connect to the Internet in order to authorize that code, and the code can only be used once. Once you use it, that game will then be linked to your Xbox Live account. "It sits on your harddrive and you have permission to play that game as long as you’d like," Harrison said.


----
I said I wouldn't believe the rumors until it came straight from MS. That is horrible.

Right now if i were to bring home a new game for my Xbox One I wouldn't be able to play it then as my Comcast is out waiting for a time to get the service tech over.
post #5944 of 7006
http://www.engadget.com/2013/05/21/hands-on-xbox-one-impulse-triggers/

Hands-on with Xbox One's new gamepad, 'impulse triggers' included

excerpts:

You've already read our hands-on with Xbox One's new Kinect and wireless gamepad, but perhaps you noticed our inability to test the gamepad's new "impulse triggers?" Well, we're glad to tell you we've just mended that exception.

First things first, though -- we got hands-on with the new gamepad in a more finished state (which is to say "with the impulse triggers and the new Start / Back buttons). The most noticeable difference is one that most gamers will likely overlook initially: the new texture on the edge of the analog sticks.



If there's one thing we never realized, it's how much time our thumbs spend glued not to the top of the thumbsticks, but to the sides of it. The new texture and thickened edges on the analog sticks add a real grippiness to the sticks. If it keeps us from slipping and missing a heashot even once, that's enough to appreciate the difference.

Now, what you're really here for -- how do the impulse triggers feel? Well, they feel weird. They feel super, super weird. The only demo were were able to control was extremely brief. In it, a helicopter goes up, and then down. In that process, you can feel the impulse triggers vibrating wildly. Though they were identical in terms of rumble applied to each trigger, we're told it can applied by developers similarly to controller rumble. The rumble in the controller we used was extremely strong, and that makes sense given the placement of the rumble motors -- directly inside each of the triggers.

From the brief demo, we can't quite tell if rumble triggers will be a game changer, exactly, but it sure is a noticeable change from the past. Like any other game technology, the real test will be with games that take advantage of its promise (or not) -- we're looking to E3 to make that rest a reality.

post #5945 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlysublime View Post

http://www.engadget.com/2013/05/21/xbox-one-used-games/#continued
#4 - You can download games that were purchased on disc

Here's an interesting situation. What happens if you want to play a game you own on a friends console? You will, Penello says, have "the ability to go over to your friends house, download your save game, or even download your game to his Xbox and pick up where you left off." So, not only will your game saves be stored in the cloud, your entire game library will be and you'll be able to download it from anywhere.

It could take a very long time (depending on their internet speeds) to download a next-gen game on your friends machine. Maybe download one day and play the next?
post #5946 of 7006
http://www.engadget.com/2013/05/21/xbox-one-hard-drive/

excerpts:

Xbox One has non-replaceable hard drive, external storage is supported

We had the opportunity to chat with Albert Penello, senior director of product planning at Microsoft this afternoon, who was kind enough to clarify a few topics for us regarding the recently-unveiled Xbox One. One thing we were quick to ask about was the integrated storage. 500GB sounds like a lot today -- but so did the 20GB unit in the original Xbox 360. The HDD there was, at least, replaceable. Can you do the same with its successor? Sadly, no. Hard drives in the Xbox One are non-user-serviceable, but Penello confirmed that the USB 3.0 port is there for external storage, which can be used for everything the internal storage can be used for. That includes game installs and downloads. So, don't fret: adding storage will be just as easy as ever.
post #5947 of 7006
Quote:
Kotaku: If I’m playing a single player game, do I have to be online at least once per hour or something like that? Or can I go weeks and weeks?

Harrison: I believe it’s 24 hours.

Kotaku: I’d have to connect online once every day.

Harrison: Correct.

Is there a completely disgusted emoticon?
post #5948 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlysublime View Post

http://gizmodo.com/kinect-2-full-video-walkthrough-the-xbox-sees-you-like-509155673

The face recognition recognizes you, personally, and can tell if you're "engaged" or not engaged, meaning if you say "Xbox pause" while not looking at the TV, it won't listen to you. This seems like something you'd maybe want to turn off, but it's still impressive it can read your expression and know if you're happy, sad, or bored.

This part will be really cool. It is often hard to listen to Gaming sites using the Youtube app because everything some one says Xbox Kinect reacts to it.
post #5949 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

Made even easier now that its confirmed the one will require the kinect plugged in at all times in order to function:

http://www.polygon.com/2013/5/21/4352732/xbox-one-requires-kinect

Hopefully there's an easy way to acquire one or the other for a reduced price, if one part fails. Would be pretty lame to have to scrap your Xbox, or even just not be able to play for a time, cause the kinect fell off the TV. I didnt see anyone on stage using the controller for the UI....but I have to imagine that's possible. Cause I'm not waving at my TV....I'm just not.

for me the fact that it has to have kinect is pretty much a deal breaker. i don't want it and will never use it. now if i can just plug it in and wrap it in ducktape/leave it pointed at the floor in a box to make it non functional i may reconsider
post #5950 of 7006
http://www.theverge.com/microsoft/2013/5/21/4353378/hands-on-xbox-one-controller/in/4116279

excerpts:

Hands-on with the new Xbox One controller and its crazy vibrations

The Xbox One console is nice, but what really matters is the controller: after all, it's the thing you hold in your hands the whole time you're using the console, and if Microsoft has its way that's going to happen a lot. We had a chance to spend a few minutes using the new controller, and while we can't say our minds are blown, Microsoft's definitely thinking in new ways about the new Xbox.

The controller's design is mostly the same as the Xbox 360. It's a little smaller, since the company was able to retract the removable battery into the device itself, so there's no bump on the back. It's also a little more refined, with black buttons instead of colored ones, and Microsoft says it's also improved the analog sticks and triggers. (Reps made a big deal out of saying they tested the buttons at least two million times.) Those are hard to test without really digging into a game over time, though the analog sticks are certainly grippier and more textured. But one thing was immediately apparent: the new "impulse triggers" on the back of the controller.

nstead of having two vibration motors, one in the base of each grip, there are four inside the Xbox One's controller: two in the grips and one in each trigger. The pads of your fingers are incredibly sensitive, Microsoft told us, and the vibration in the triggers adds to the immersion of the whole experience. To prove it the company showed us six demos, involving things like a car revving its engine and firing a laser gun. With each came unique, applicable vibrations, and the extra motors really do add to the effect: you feel the recoil on the gunshot more, and the whirring engine made my whole body start to shiver as if I were really in a rumbling car. At points it was almost too much, jarring the controller and my hands so much that it became hard to use the controller normally, but for now we'll chalk that up to proving the point in the demo.

Microsoft says there are forty improvements to the controller with the Xbox One — we're not sure all forty are exactly game-changing, but they might not need to be. Microsoft did it pretty well last time.
post #5951 of 7006
So if you get banned from XBL does that mean that you can lose your whole Xbox One game library? That would totally draconian...
post #5952 of 7006
http://www.theverge.com/2013/5/21/4353232/kinect-xbox-one-hands-on/in/4116279

excerpts:

The all-seeing Kinect: tracking my face, arms, body, and heart on the Xbox One

"It's what's on the inside that counts" is something of an unofficial mantra of Microsoft's new Xbox One. The Kinect is perhaps the best example: externally, it's more or less unchanged from its predecessor, but it's actually a very different device. It's been upgraded in a huge way, but the end result is simple: the Kinect just sees more. (And hears more, but that's another matter.)

It has an ultra-wide 1080p camera (which should mean the Xbox One doesn't require such a large room), which easily picked up all of the dozen or so people sitting in the "living room" testing lab on Microsoft's campus. Kinect can even see in the dark, thanks to an infrared sensor that engages when the primary camera can't see anything. Along with higher-end processing power and a host of new software, Kinect feels a bit like it's gone from usable prototype to real, legitimate product.

Kinect has always been able to tell that you're moving. But now it can tell if you're moving your thumb, and which way your thumb is facing. It can tell which muscles you're engaging at any given time, and how much — it knows the difference between a jab and an uppercut, and registers them differently. If you're playing with a friend, it can tell when the two of you switch places, or even when the two of you switch controllers. Kinect knows if you're smiling or frowning, or if you're talking or not. It knows if you're looking at the screen or not, and will only register your commands if you're looking. It knows, by either remarkable science or sorcery, your heart rate just by looking at your face.

We spent a few minutes in a crowded room using a prototype of the new Kinect, and we left reeling. There's almost no latency, things are astonishingly accurate — the muscle sensors knew even the slightest shift in my posture, and try as I might I couldn't make it think I was smiling when I wasn't. We heard it discern commands from a noise-filled room, and track our movements in the dark when we couldn't see them ourselves. It was a fairly controlled situation, though, and we're curious to see how it holds up in the real world.

The real world applications are really the whole game here. Kinect's raw capability is absolutely remarkable, but how developers will build them into games remains to be seen. Could a boxing game know the difference in how hard I punch? Could it know how tired I am based on my heart rate, and knock me out more easily? Could a shooter recognize that I'm too relaxed, and ratchet up the intensity to get me back in?

More than anything, that's what we're excited to see about Kinect and the Xbox One: how the immense amount of data turns into a more fun, more immersive gameplay experience. But at least at first blush, the data part seems to have been pretty much solved.
post #5953 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfD View Post

So if you get banned from XBL does that mean that you can lose your whole Xbox One game library? That would totally draconian...

Possibly. They could just ban you from MP, and not the store though.
post #5954 of 7006
Looks like my idea of RF id chips is what they will use. It is the only way they can code the disc to recognize that it is used.
post #5955 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by PENDRAG0ON View Post

Looks like my idea of RF id chips is what they will use. It is the only way they can code the disc to recognize that it is used.

Got a link? I figured they might just be using good old fashioned codes, but with QR codes and an always on camera, you wouldn't have to painstakingly type them in.
post #5956 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

Got a link? I figured they might just be using good old fashioned codes, but with QR codes and an always on camera, you wouldn't have to painstakingly type them in.

It was an idea I had when the first PS4 rumor came about. RF id is dirt cheap, every pack of socks at Walmart is tagged for inventory management.
post #5957 of 7006
seems to me that (from piecing together the articles), they're going to allow you to buy and sell used games. but move the middleman from places like Gamestop and Gamefly to Microsoft who can then split money with the publishers. have it be a virtual marketplace. You can buy and sell your game to your friends. the disc is a physical means for the transaction, but you can sell/buy it the digital way as well.
post #5958 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfD View Post

So if you get banned from XBL does that mean that you can lose your whole Xbox One game library? That would totally draconian...

How does one get banned from XBL? I hear things like that and it never makes sense to me.

Cheating? Extreme profanity? What does one do? I don't get it.
post #5959 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemeat View Post

Here's how the system works: when you buy an Xbox One game, you'll get a unique code that you enter when you install that game. You'll have to connect to the Internet in order to authorize that code, and the code can only be used once. Once you use it, that game will then be linked to your Xbox Live account. "It sits on your harddrive and you have permission to play that game as long as you’d like," Harrison said.


----
I said I wouldn't believe the rumors until it came straight from MS. That is horrible.

Right now if i were to bring home a new game for my Xbox One I wouldn't be able to play it then as my Comcast is out waiting for a time to get the service tech over.

Yup. Let's pray sony isn't this stupid.
post #5960 of 7006
post #5961 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Done Deal DR View Post

How does one get banned from XBL? I hear things like that and it never makes sense to me.

Cheating? Extreme profanity? What does one do? I don't get it.

http://whywasibanned.com/

post #5962 of 7006
http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2013/05/live-action-halo-tv-series-coming-to-xbox-one/

excerpts:

Live-action Halo “TV series” coming to Xbox One

Microsoft and 343 Industries announced plans for a live-action Halo TV series in partnership with Steven Spielberg at the unveiling event for the company’s new console, the Xbox One. The TV series heralds Microsoft’s intent to merge its console as much as possible with live TV, though it also represents the company's intent to to become a source for content as well as vector, as the series will be exclusive to the Xbox One.

Bonnie Ross, head of 343 Industries, made an appearance at the event to namecheck the success of the Halo-centric Web series Forward Unto Dawn as an integral step toward making the jump to a full series. Spielberg called the series "an amazing opportunity to be at intersection of mythmaking and technology."

Microsoft also emphasized its intent to add to live sports games, showing a fantasy basketball league interface over a live basketball game. Xbox One will also get content integrated with NFL that will be exclusive to the Xbox dashboard experience.
post #5963 of 7006
The pass-through tv stuff seems lame to me. They should have added a cable card slot and made it a full blown HTPC-then I might be interested. As it is, it's a dependent device as far as tv goes. I don't think the Roku/apple tv crowd is going to pay $400 just so they can wave at their tv--I could be wrong though. They showed so little about games...so who knows about that... but it does sound like Gamefly is dead.
post #5964 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlysublime View Post

http://whywasibanned.com/


So, cheating. Seems pretty easy to not get banned. Don't modify the console, don't cheat.

Why the concern over being banned? Seems incredibly improbable if you just log in and play games like the masses.
post #5965 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by TyrantII View Post

Yup. Let's pray sony isn't this stupid.

I hope not but it's hard to believe MS would go out on a limb by themselves.
post #5966 of 7006
I don't think I will ever buy a disc again. There is no need if you can download the first portion of the game and start playing while the rest downloads. This is just awesome. I will pre purchase games and have them download at launch while I sleep. Hopefully they let us download early and activate at midnight.

glad to see the optical out on the back of the X1 (I want to own an X1 just like Pee Wee Herman, ha ha). My ridiculously growing headphone collection can still use the Mixamp.

I am hoping this is no more than $500. I will pay whatever, but many others won't.
post #5967 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Done Deal DR View Post



Why the concern over being banned? Seems incredibly improbable if you just log in and play games like the masses.

Cheating, swearing, breaking TOS, or posting selfies over video chat.

I always found it amusing that they handle this in public on their "private forums" for all to see. Some really funny take downs of riftraff when they post why these knuckleheads got banned.
post #5968 of 7006
Thread Starter 
wow, talk about confusing. The whole used game, can your kids play a game on their gamertag thing is pretty freaking crazy. To think we are going to have to wait almost 3 weeks to find out the real story to this. (Unless MS decides to delay a more thorough explanation further).


Things used to be so simple...
post #5969 of 7006
Sorry if it has been discussed, I am new to the thread...The Kinect II is obviously a separate unit. (my fear was that it was gong to be connected to the console.) I am assuming it uses the USB 3.0 to connect it to the console. Is there a press release that shows if we can have it 20+ feet away, for those of us that use it in a theater environment? (My equipment rack is not in front of my screen, like many here)
post #5970 of 7006
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProfD View Post

It could take a very long time (depending on their internet speeds) to download a next-gen game on your friends machine. Maybe download one day and play the next?

It would probably make more sense to just take the disc over and let it install in their machine. I would assume it would the same way DLC and arcade games work now. They can play the content as long as you are signed in. Once you leave it would go back to "trial" mode. Or possibly give the person to buy it out right.
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