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Official Samsung UNXXD6000 Owners' Thread - Page 85

post #2521 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squishy Tia View Post


For the PS3 you want to do this:

PS3: System -> Displays
- RGB Ful Range (HDMI): ON
- Deep Color: ON

Samsung TV:
- HDMI Black Level: NORMAL
- Color Space: Auto

These settings will produce the proper colors and allow the full range to be seen without being washed out. HDMI Black Level should only ever be set on Low if you are using a device that is incapable of transmitting a 0-255 color range signal or 4:4:4 encoded signal. All modern (8800 and later nVidia series; Radeon 5000 and later AMD series) video cards output in 4:4:4 and support 10-bit color at 48-bits, and most DVD players and all blu-ray players support 4:4:4 colorspace encoding.

Never ever ever EVER set the TV's color space to Native unless you're using a computer application specifically designed to exceed the sRGB color gamut output. This means you should never have Native active, or else it will oversaturate the colors onscreen (especially red).

Samsung did a major disservice to video quality by having the defaults be active for dynamic contrast, HDMI Black Level: Low, and Color Space: Native. Those settings just don't jive with what the devices made in the last five years output.

Thanks squishy, any input on achieving the "soap opera" look without having the screen jitters all the time?
post #2522 of 3067
I got your PM, and I'll add something here for you balla01.

It just dawned on me you might be referring to screen stutter with AMP, and not jitter. Stutter is when the TV does not have enough time to inject an interpolated frame every other frame like it needs to in order to give you the "smoothing" effect. It's sort of a "hurry up and wait" situation where the picture starts off somewhat smooth, becomes very smooth, then suddenly jerks (almost like it's stuck) until it re-syncs with the incoming signal and the process starts all over again.

If you have a set that's labeled as 120 Hz AutoMotionPlus, this is because at only twice the interpolation rate vs. physical LCD panel refresh rate, there isn't enough time to inject the new frame between the two key frames continously. It'll do what I just noted above. In order to achieve full smoothing effect you need at least a 3:1 ratio of frame interpolation rate to physical LCD panel rate, and since panel refresh rates are locked at 60 Hz maximum, you need a 180 Hz/FPS GPU interpolation rate within the TV's circuitry.

Now, if you have a 240 Hz listed AMP enabled TV (sic), you'll normally be OK and experience virtually no jitter or stuttering at all, since those TVs' internal GPU processing is done at a 4:1 ratio, which exceeds the 3:1 ratio minimum needed for a KF:IF:KF:IF:KF:IF:KF continuous cycle (KF = key frame, IF = interpolated frame).

You'll notice me say "(sic)" in my post. It's because of how Samsung employs its egregeous marketing schemes on the specs for these TVs. You'll often see "240 Hz Clear Motion Rate". That is NOT the same thing as AutoMotionPlus. The smoothing effects are provided via AMP, and unless AMP is specifically listed as 240 Hz, you'll only get proper smoothing when the video source signal is 24 or 30 Hz. 60 Hz video signals (like that of the PS3) won't be smoothed properly a lot of the time.

So for a 120 Hz AutoMotionPlus enabled set, these are the following refresh rates that should provide proper smoothing via AMP:

24 Hz
29.95 Hz (NTSC Interlaced)
30 Hz (QuickTime/WMA Interlaced)

This is because each of those refresh rate has a ≥3:1 interpolation ratio to incoming refresh rate when used with a 120 Hz AMP TV. The 240 Hz AMP TVs shouldn't have this limitation as their processing exceeds what is needed for 3:1 (180 Hz) for 60 Hz incoming video sources.

Edit: When watching DVD/Blu-Rays on your PS3, you'll want the 24 Hz setting in the PS3's settings to be set to Auto or On (preferrably Auto). This will ensure your movies can be smoothed with little to no stutter.
post #2523 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squishy Tia View Post

I got your PM, and I'll add something here for you balla01.

It just dawned on me you might be referring to screen stutter with AMP, and not jitter. Stutter is when the TV does not have enough time to inject an interpolated frame every other frame like it needs to in order to give you the "smoothing" effect. It's sort of a "hurry up and wait" situation where the picture starts off somewhat smooth, becomes very smooth, then suddenly jerks (almost like it's stuck) until it re-syncs with the incoming signal and the process starts all over again.

If you have a set that's labeled as 120 Hz AutoMotionPlus, this is because at only twice the interpolation rate vs. physical LCD panel refresh rate, there isn't enough time to inject the new frame between the two key frames continously. It'll do what I just noted above. In order to achieve full smoothing effect you need at least a 3:1 ratio of frame interpolation rate to physical LCD panel rate, and since panel refresh rates are locked at 60 Hz maximum, you need a 180 Hz/FPS GPU interpolation rate within the TV's circuitry.

Now, if you have a 240 Hz listed AMP enabled TV (sic), you'll normally be OK and experience virtually no jitter or stuttering at all, since those TVs' internal GPU processing is done at a 4:1 ratio, which exceeds the 3:1 ratio minimum needed for a KF:IF:KF:IF:KF:IF:KF continuous cycle (KF = key frame, IF = interpolated frame).

You'll notice me say "(sic)" in my post. It's because of how Samsung employs its egregeous marketing schemes on the specs for these TVs. You'll often see "240 Hz Clear Motion Rate". That is NOT the same thing as AutoMotionPlus. The smoothing effects are provided via AMP, and unless AMP is specifically listed as 240 Hz, you'll only get proper smoothing when the video source signal is 24 or 30 Hz. 60 Hz video signals (like that of the PS3) won't be smoothed properly a lot of the time.

So for a 120 Hz AutoMotionPlus enabled set, these are the following refresh rates that should provide proper smoothing via AMP:

24 Hz
29.95 Hz (NTSC Interlaced)
30 Hz (QuickTime/WMA Interlaced)

This is because each of those refresh rate has a >=3:1 interpolation ratio to incoming refresh rate when used with a 120 Hz AMP TV. The 240 Hz AMP TVs shouldn't have this limitation as their processing exceeds what is needed for 3:1 (180 Hz) for 60 Hz incoming video sources.

Edit: When watching DVD/Blu-Rays on your PS3, you'll want the 24 Hz setting in the PS3's settings to be set to Auto or On (preferrably Auto). This will ensure your movies can be smoothed with little to no stutter.

Wow, thanks for the response. I have a UN46d6900 120hz with AMP The set is great, I have found that redwolf4k's settings on pg67 are awesome and give it a great picture. I've seen that you need the AMP set to standard to achieve the soap opera look, but I can't get around the screen stutters. I will keep messing with it and see if I can come up with a successful formula.
post #2524 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by balla01 View Post

Wow, thanks for the response. I have a UN46d6900 120hz with AMP The set is great, I have found that redwolf4k's settings on pg67 are awesome and give it a great picture. I've seen that you need the AMP set to standard to achieve the soap opera look, but I can't get around the screen stutters. I will keep messing with it and see if I can come up with a successful formula.

Standard setting for AMP will give a mild soap opera effect, while Smooth will give the maximum effect. But for Smooth to work, you'll need your source material to be 24Hz or 30 Hz, or in the case of PS3 games, 60 Hz with a clean signal.
post #2525 of 3067
Can anyone recommend a good wireless adapter for the UN60D6000? I heard that the Samsung version isn't very good and overpriced.
post #2526 of 3067
I'm about to buy a Samsung UN60D6000. I was about to buy a Sharp comparable model, but after doing multiple shopping trips, the UN60D6000 just seemed to have a picture picture and didn't blur on sports.

Can anyone with one of the sets recommend it?
post #2527 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by cougartrace View Post

I'm about to buy a Samsung UN60D6000. I was about to buy a Sharp comparable model, but after doing multiple shopping trips, the UN60D6000 just seemed to have a picture picture and didn't blur on sports.

Can anyone with one of the sets recommend it?

The best setting I have found was by redwolf4k on page 67.
post #2528 of 3067
Hey everyone. I just purchased the 6005 model and I am having some issues with watching netflix. As I am watching, the picture appears to switch between a hi-def picture at 240hz to a less the pleasant picture. something that looks around a 60hz picture. If I watch netflix on my PS3 i have a perfect looking picture but then the sound with my 5.1 system seems to have a digital delay. I am also getting a little bit of a digital delay with my satellite picture also. Any suggestions? thanks!
post #2529 of 3067
Hi Guys -

I just picked up a 55D6900 last night at Best Buy w/four pairs of glasses, but intentionally waited til this morning to open it to check Sunday Morning ad prices.

Another store now has the d6400 for a couple hundred dollars less.

Any one who has used both have any opinions on whether the 200 price different is worth returning th 6900 and getting the 6400? Better picture is more valuable to me than better 3D and more apps FWIW.

Thanks
post #2530 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by cougartrace View Post

I'm about to buy a Samsung UN60D6000. I was about to buy a Sharp comparable model, but after doing multiple shopping trips, the UN60D6000 just seemed to have a picture picture and didn't blur on sports.

Can anyone with one of the sets recommend it?

I have had the UN60D6000 since Nov '11. I absolutely love it, incredible picture. Don't use the Web features so no opinion there. Sound is like Any other TV, adequate for news, documentaries and other talk shows. IMO, with ANY TV, if you want "good" to great sound beyond those categories then you must invest in even the cheapest home theater system or better an AVR setup.
post #2531 of 3067
Just a heads up for those looking at redwolf4k's settings, the following should not be used unless the signal source is too old to provide a full range (0-255) HDMI signal:

HDMI Black Level: Low (This should be on Normal or else modern devices will appear washed out. Low produces only 17-237 instead of 0-255)

Sharpness: Anything >0

Sharpness on a digital signal does nothing but introduce noise into the picture. Digital signals are not like analog signals. With analog you could have signal degredation and sharpness had a real world benefit as it provided signal gain to restore the signal to a closer to proper level. With digital signals, it's either "all there or not there at all". There is no in between. Sharpness does nothing to add detail, and in fact hides details, as does edge enhancement.

Edge enhancement should only be used on SD content. On HD content it diminishes picture quality much like sharpness does.

Another reason you want to avoid touching sharpness on digital signals is that these TVs use chroma subsampling in all modes except PC Mode. That means that it uses subpixel manipulation to "smooth out" primary colors, resulting in what many refer to as very blurry text (when text is not black). Sharpness and edge enhancement compound this severely, so you really want to avoid them unless you like losing detail.

Remember, signals at the native resolution are already 1:1 pixel mapped and should not be changed other than color balancing. These aren't CRTs - they're fixed pixel displays.
post #2532 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squishy Tia View Post

Just a heads up for those looking at redwolf4k's settings, the following should not be used unless the signal source is too old to provide a full range (0-255) HDMI signal:

HDMI Black Level: Low (This should be on Normal or else modern devices will appear washed out. Low produces only 17-237 instead of 0-255)

Sharpness: Anything >0

Sharpness on a digital signal does nothing but introduce noise into the picture. Digital signals are not like analog signals. With analog you could have signal degredation and sharpness had a real world benefit as it provided signal gain to restore the signal to a closer to proper level. With digital signals, it's either "all there or not there at all". There is no in between. Sharpness does nothing to add detail, and in fact hides details, as does edge enhancement.

Edge enhancement should only be used on SD content. On HD content it diminishes picture quality much like sharpness does.

Another reason you want to avoid touching sharpness on digital signals is that these TVs use chroma subsampling in all modes except PC Mode. That means that it uses subpixel manipulation to "smooth out" primary colors, resulting in what many refer to as very blurry text (when text is not black). Sharpness and edge enhancement compound this severely, so you really want to avoid them unless you like losing detail.

Remember, signals at the native resolution are already 1:1 pixel mapped and should not be changed other than color balancing. These aren't CRTs - they're fixed pixel displays.

Do you suggest leaving the LED motion plus off??
post #2533 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squishy Tia View Post

Just a heads up for those looking at redwolf4k's settings, the following should not be used unless the signal source is too old to provide a full range (0-255) HDMI signal:

HDMI Black Level: Low (This should be on Normal or else modern devices will appear washed out. Low produces only 17-237 instead of 0-255)

Sharpness: Anything >0

Sharpness on a digital signal does nothing but introduce noise into the picture. Digital signals are not like analog signals. With analog you could have signal degredation and sharpness had a real world benefit as it provided signal gain to restore the signal to a closer to proper level. With digital signals, it's either "all there or not there at all". There is no in between. Sharpness does nothing to add detail, and in fact hides details, as does edge enhancement.

Edge enhancement should only be used on SD content. On HD content it diminishes picture quality much like sharpness does.

Another reason you want to avoid touching sharpness on digital signals is that these TVs use chroma subsampling in all modes except PC Mode. That means that it uses subpixel manipulation to "smooth out" primary colors, resulting in what many refer to as very blurry text (when text is not black). Sharpness and edge enhancement compound this severely, so you really want to avoid them unless you like losing detail.

Remember, signals at the native resolution are already 1:1 pixel mapped and should not be changed other than color balancing. These aren't CRTs - they're fixed pixel displays.

I fully agree with this post.
post #2534 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squishy Tia View Post

Just a heads up for those looking at redwolf4k's settings, the following should not be used unless the signal source is too old to provide a full range (0-255) HDMI signal:

HDMI Black Level: Low (This should be on Normal or else modern devices will appear washed out. Low produces only 17-237 instead of 0-255)

Sharpness: Anything >0

Sharpness on a digital signal does nothing but introduce noise into the picture. Digital signals are not like analog signals. With analog you could have signal degredation and sharpness had a real world benefit as it provided signal gain to restore the signal to a closer to proper level. With digital signals, it's either "all there or not there at all". There is no in between. Sharpness does nothing to add detail, and in fact hides details, as does edge enhancement.

Edge enhancement should only be used on SD content. On HD content it diminishes picture quality much like sharpness does.

Another reason you want to avoid touching sharpness on digital signals is that these TVs use chroma subsampling in all modes except PC Mode. That means that it uses subpixel manipulation to "smooth out" primary colors, resulting in what many refer to as very blurry text (when text is not black). Sharpness and edge enhancement compound this severely, so you really want to avoid them unless you like losing detail.

Remember, signals at the native resolution are already 1:1 pixel mapped and should not be changed other than color balancing. These aren't CRTs - they're fixed pixel displays.

So are you saying leave sharpness on 0? Your inequality symbol is saying anything greater than 0, but your description is saying leave it on 0.
post #2535 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by cougartrace View Post

Can anyone recommend a good wireless adapter for the UN60D6000? I heard that the Samsung version isn't very good and overpriced.

The Rosewill RNX-N1 from Newegg.com works perfectly and is currently $20 after
$10 off w/ promo code EMCNJGJ43. This offer is good through 2/6/12 and includes free shipping.
post #2536 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by balla01 View Post

So are you saying leave sharpness on 0? Your inequality symbol is saying anything greater than 0, but your description is saying leave it on 0.

My post starts with "The following should not be used..." That indicates the listed settings should not be used, so >0 means just that, nothing greater than zero should be used.

LED Motion Plus is what is known as backlight strobing. It will strobe the backlight on and off in 1/60th of a second intervals. This supposedly reduces motion blur for some people, but can induce headaches in many because it is basically a form of flickering of the backlight. It will also reduce the effective backlight level by a factor of seven points, so if you have a backlight set to 14, LED Motion Plus will make your effective backlight setting equal to 7 (and screw up your calibration accordingly). If you intend to use LED MP, activate it before you calibrate colors/white balance. Be aware that if using a hardware calibrator, that the flickering will prevent the calibrator from working properly.
post #2537 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squishy Tia View Post


My post starts with "The following should not be used..." That indicates the listed settings should not be used, so >0 means just that, nothing greater than zero should be used.

LED Motion Plus is what is known as backlight strobing. It will strobe the backlight on and off in 1/60th of a second intervals. This supposedly reduces motion blur for some people, but can induce headaches in many because it is basically a form of flickering of the backlight. It will also reduce the effective backlight level by a factor of seven points, so if you have a backlight set to 14, LED Motion Plus will make your effective backlight setting equal to 7 (and screw up your calibration accordingly). If you intend to use LED MP, activate it before you calibrate colors/white balance. Be aware that if using a hardware calibrator, that the flickering will prevent the calibrator from working properly.

Thanks, I wasn't jabbing at you, I was just trying to understand what you were saying. Do you think the LED motion plus is worth leaving on?

Did anyone else have any flickering during the Super Bowl last night?
post #2538 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by balla01 View Post

Did anyone else have any flickering during the Super Bowl last night?

I was getting some pixelation every time they wiped to or from a replay, and sometimes along bottom where the score graphics were. This was a UN55D6000. I haven't had the TV all that long, but it's never happened before -- even during sports -- so I'm not exactly sure what was going on. This was with an OTA antenna, so I'm not really sure if it was a setting on my end or possibly a problem with the signal coming from the local affiliate.
post #2539 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by balla01 View Post

Don't turn away a H301, I got mine a week ago and it looks great.

My experience at BB this past Saturday was surprising - in a very good way. When I reported to the service deck with TV #3 in tow, saying that I was on my 3rd panel, they assigned the manager of the Geek Squad to my case. I have created several JPG test sceens (I will post them later for folks to use) to highlight the uniformity issues and loaded them on a thumb drive. Even in the harsh light of the store, when we viewed them on my set, the Geek Squad manger shook his head and said, "What do you want to do?" PS - I also showed him this thread. He was very accommodating and knowledgable. We talked about various options - did I want a Sony replacement, or even a D6900 or D7000? I told him to check the warehouse to let me know what was available. We were looking to see if there were any H303 panels. He did have 3 D6420 H302 available, and said, "Well, why don't you choose one." I did, and we opened it up, and viewed the images on my thrumb drive. We both agreed that it looked clean, but he said if there is any problem, bring it back and we will look at other options. Now, that's service!!!

So, the new panel is home, set up and dialed in, and it does look good - the best so far. I'm keeping my fingers crossed. Wow, has this been a journey.
post #2540 of 3067
I have a CN07 (46") panel and experience zero of the problems listed in this thread. My experience with AMP is totally opposite of everything I've read, because I don't get any "soap opera effect" regardless of which setting I choose for AMP, I simply can't reproduce it even when I try to. Motion is crisp and clear regardless of AMP setting, so I just leave it off and the picture is amazing.
j
post #2541 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squishy Tia View Post

My post starts with "The following should not be used..." That indicates the listed settings should not be used, so >0 means just that, nothing greater than zero should be used.

LED Motion Plus is what is known as backlight strobing. It will strobe the backlight on and off in 1/60th of a second intervals. This supposedly reduces motion blur for some people, but can induce headaches in many because it is basically a form of flickering of the backlight. It will also reduce the effective backlight level by a factor of seven points, so if you have a backlight set to 14, LED Motion Plus will make your effective backlight setting equal to 7 (and screw up your calibration accordingly). If you intend to use LED MP, activate it before you calibrate colors/white balance. Be aware that if using a hardware calibrator, that the flickering will prevent the calibrator from working properly.

I have the 46D6500 and i have the Led Motion Plus and i don't see any flickering.

Also on the sharpness setting, i wach Directv HD if i put it at 0, everything is blurred. I notice a lot of people and calibrators say to put sharpness at 0, but to me that setting, the picture is awful. I keep it around 35 to 40.
post #2542 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick1000 View Post


Also on the sharpness setting, i wach Directv HD if i put it at 0, everything is blurred. I notice a lot of people and calibrators say to put sharpness at 0, but to me that setting, the picture is awful. I keep it around 35 to 40.



I have a 60" 6420 and I agree. I found the following from a certified calibrator regarding sharpness, and note how he talks about the way we perceive the image vs actual measurements. I think the often repeated phrase of "turning sharpness to 0, because it's the correct thing to do" is wrong. So maybe the setting adds something to the picture that wasn't there from the beginning, but if it looks better to our human eyes, because of the way we naturally perceive the picture, then isn't that what really matters? To be clear, no, I'm not saying crank the sharpness up to max, but setting it to 0 or off, so the picture is perceived too soft and fuzzy, is just as bad.

"SHARPNESS:

Sharpness is perhaps the most difficult element of TV calibration to explain, in part because it has more to do with how our eyes perceive an image than with anything that can be physically measured. For starters, it may help to understand what the Sharpness control can and cannot do. It cannot actually increase or decrease the physical resolution of your television: the resolution depends on the actual number of pixels available in the panel's construction. What it can do, though, is make transitions between colors and shades appear sharper to the eye. You might initially think "the sharper the better," and set the Sharpness to it's maximum. The problem is, however, that as your TV increases the visible sharpness of an image, it also introduces unwanted artifacts that detract from accuracy, and even cause eyestrain during prolonged viewing.

"When the Sharpness setting exceeds the optimal level, you will see artifacts around any edge between black and white"
The THX Optimizer does not include a Sharpness test pattern, but the DVE and AVIA discs include similar ones: a gray background featuring a black circle with lines radiating out towards the edges of the screen. This pattern is designed to give the sharpness of your TV an optimal test, but even without a test pattern you can see the effects of the Sharpness control: when the Sharpness setting exceeds the optimal level, you will see the artifacts of excessive sharpness around any edge between black and white, or between different colors on the screen. This usually appears as a either a dark "ghost" images of the edge, or a bright "halo" around objects in the picture. These artifacts, not present in the DVD signal, serve to highlight the edges and make appear more defined to the eye.

What you're looking for as you adjust the Sharpness is to get the sharpest possible lines and text in the test pattern image, without the appearance of these false edges and the "halo" effect. Start by cranking up the Sharpness control until the halo artifacts are evident, then back down slowly to the point where they just disappear. At first glance, the picture may appear to the eye to be overly "soft," or slightly blurry. But once your eyes get used to the Sharpness level, you'll actually begin to see more detail, especially in moving images, because the edge effects won't be distracting you from the intended image.

As with any setting, of course the final choice is up to you: some TVs, even good ones, have a naturally soft picture and you may find you actually like a little "extra" sharpening to get the most enjoyable effect. If nothing else, calibrating the Sharpness by this method will give a good baseline to start from."
post #2543 of 3067
what's the difference with the 6000 and 6000s models, is this the same or is the s model the updated model. i've bought a samsung 2 yrs ago and now looking for another for the bedroom and wanted to get another samsung, but i'm reading about a lot of problems samsung has now. should i buy another samsung (best buy has the 6000s on sale) or should i buy a different brand. ps i like the glossy screen samsung has
post #2544 of 3067
I recently purchased the 55D6000 and notice that when there is a ticker text scrolling at the bottom or different graphics of texts like on a commercial, the text seems jiggly or wobbly. It looks like the text is stuttering. It doesn't seem natural or normal. Any suggestions to correct this issue? Is it a setting issue?
post #2545 of 3067
Set AMP to clear
post #2546 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowplay0918 View Post

I called Samsung about the ghosting and flashlighting and they immediately offered to replace the panel and scheduled it for last Friday. Guy from local place (I'm in Chicago NW 'burbs) called me that day and said he couldn't get a panel in and re-scheduled for this Friday.

Just received a call from Samsung and they were having trouble getting the part and would call the local BB where I purchased the tv back in August/September (they matched Amazon's price at the time) to arrange an exchange for a new tv.

Could they be running out of panels?

I went to Best Buy and they said I could upgrade so made an impulse decision and picked up the D6900 for $200 more (H301 panel - looked it up after it was home and out of the box). The clouding and corner lighting almost completely gone but there are around 10 red dots (about 1 cm each) at bottom of the screen.

Getting real tired of packing this up and being scared I'm going to break it getting it into the car so I can return it....
post #2547 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtirei View Post

what's the difference with the 6000 and 6000s models,

AS far as I know, they are the same. Best Buy sells them as xxxx6000S. Samsung's website lists them as xxxx6000SF, which is the way the box is marked when you buy one from Best Buy. The long model number is xxxx6000SFXZA. I bought 2 6000's from Best Buy, and the receipts are marked as xxxx6000SF.
post #2548 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by starsguy12 View Post

I recently purchased the 55D6000 and notice that when there is a ticker text scrolling at the bottom or different graphics of texts like on a commercial, the text seems jiggly or wobbly. It looks like the text is stuttering. It doesn't seem natural or normal. Any suggestions to correct this issue? Is it a setting issue?

Try to set amp at 'Clear' like D Bone says and also put film mode to 'Auto 2'
post #2549 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by D Bone View Post

I have a 60" 6420 and I agree. I found the following from a certified calibrator regarding sharpness, and note how he talks about the way we perceive the image vs actual measurements. I think the often repeated phrase of "turning sharpness to 0, because it's the correct thing to do" is wrong. So maybe the setting adds something to the picture that wasn't there from the beginning, but if it looks better to our human eyes, because of the way we naturally perceive the picture, then isn't that what really matters? To be clear, no, I'm not saying crank the sharpness up to max, but setting it to 0 or off, so the picture is perceived too soft and fuzzy, is just as bad.

"SHARPNESS:

Sharpness is perhaps the most difficult element of TV calibration to explain, in part because it has more to do with how our eyes perceive an image than with anything that can be physically measured. For starters, it may help to understand what the Sharpness control can and cannot do. It cannot actually increase or decrease the physical resolution of your television: the resolution depends on the actual number of pixels available in the panel's construction. What it can do, though, is make transitions between colors and shades appear sharper to the eye. You might initially think "the sharper the better," and set the Sharpness to it's maximum. The problem is, however, that as your TV increases the visible sharpness of an image, it also introduces unwanted artifacts that detract from accuracy, and even cause eyestrain during prolonged viewing.

"When the Sharpness setting exceeds the optimal level, you will see artifacts around any edge between black and white"
The THX Optimizer does not include a Sharpness test pattern, but the DVE and AVIA discs include similar ones: a gray background featuring a black circle with lines radiating out towards the edges of the screen. This pattern is designed to give the sharpness of your TV an optimal test, but even without a test pattern you can see the effects of the Sharpness control: when the Sharpness setting exceeds the optimal level, you will see the artifacts of excessive sharpness around any edge between black and white, or between different colors on the screen. This usually appears as a either a dark "ghost" images of the edge, or a bright "halo" around objects in the picture. These artifacts, not present in the DVD signal, serve to highlight the edges and make appear more defined to the eye.

What you're looking for as you adjust the Sharpness is to get the sharpest possible lines and text in the test pattern image, without the appearance of these false edges and the "halo" effect. Start by cranking up the Sharpness control until the halo artifacts are evident, then back down slowly to the point where they just disappear. At first glance, the picture may appear to the eye to be overly "soft," or slightly blurry. But once your eyes get used to the Sharpness level, you'll actually begin to see more detail, especially in moving images, because the edge effects won't be distracting you from the intended image.

As with any setting, of course the final choice is up to you: some TVs, even good ones, have a naturally soft picture and you may find you actually like a little "extra" sharpening to get the most enjoyable effect. If nothing else, calibrating the Sharpness by this method will give a good baseline to start from."

I couldn't agree more.
post #2550 of 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick1000 View Post

I couldn't agree more.

What I've noticed is that there is no difference if the sharpness level is at 0 or 10. Above 10 the ringing begins in earnest. Therefore, I leave it at 0. Also, make sure your screen setting is "Fit" and not 16X9.
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