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Which is best wireless router choice? Netgear N450 WNDR4000 or N300 WNDR3800 - Page 4

post #91 of 416
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by broadwayblue View Post

My old Linksys WRT54GL is on the fritz and I've been thinking about giving Netgear a shot. I searched all over the internet to find info on these models and sure enough I ended up back here. So now I'm trying to figure out if my linksys will hold out until June so I can go with the 3800. The Readyshare printer feature does sound like a winner as I've never been successful in printing from my pc to a printer connected to a different computer on my network. Just curious, would all 3 of these models (3700, 3800 and 4000) have approximately the same range?

The range on all three will be similar.

Bob Silver
Netgear
post #92 of 416
Bob - you'd mentioned earlier that you have a 3700, and plan to purchase a 3800 and use the 3700 as an extender, I think? Can you elaborate on this, what options are available in the Netgear config/firmware to effect this ... e.g., is it WDS, or a proprietary Netgear protocol, etc? Would the 37000-extended network utilize the same SSID, or appear as a different network?
post #93 of 416
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by netarc View Post

Bob - you'd mentioned earlier that you have a 3700, and plan to purchase a 3800 and use the 3700 as an extender, I think? Can you elaborate on this, what options are available in the Netgear config/firmware to effect this ... e.g., is it WDS, or a proprietary Netgear protocol, etc? Would the 37000-extended network utilize the same SSID, or appear as a different network?

This is a little known fact that you can turn a router into in access point by some simple settings. What makes a 3700 a great access point is you have both the 2.4 and 5ghz bands. Plus believe it or not a 3700 as an access point will cost much less then buying a dedicated access point. Plus you have the benefit of having a spare router should your main one fail which amazingly enough has happened to me.

So the steps to do this are these. You first need to TURN OFF the DHCP server of the router you are going to use as an access point. You do not want your access point creating ip addresses. Only your main router. Second you need to set your 3700 AP to an ip address that is different then your router. Example if your router is 192.168.1.1 then set your access point router to 192.168.1.2.

Then connect an Ethernet cable from your network to one of the 4 switch ports NOT IN THE WAN PORT on the 3700 AP. You can leave the SSID to the same as your main new router and leave the channel selection to auto on both the main router and the access point router . This will create a seamless wireless connection throughout your house. Or if you like you can make it a separate SSID but I keep mine the same.

I will tell you having a pair of 3700's is fantastic. I have complete wireless coverage on both my 2.4ghz and the 5ghz wireless bands. This makes using wireless for video and data transfers quite painless. My wife and I have ipads and Macbooks. So we keep those devices on the 5ghz band (along with 2 Roku's) and leave the 2.4 for all other wireless devices like security cameras and all other wireless devices. It works great and I highly suggest you do it.

Bob Silver
Netgear AV Consultant
post #94 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post
The range on all three will be similar.

Bob Silver
Netgear
Thanks for the reply. Sounds like it's hard to make a bad choice with these 3.
post #95 of 416
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by broadwayblue View Post

Thanks for the reply. Sounds like it's hard to make a bad choice with these 3.

Well fortunately you are right. You cant make a bad choice. Determine your priority and let that be your guide.

Bob Silver
Netgear AV Consultant
post #96 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post

This is a little known fact that you can turn a router into in access point by some simple settings. What makes a 3700 a great access point is you have both the 2.4 and 5ghz bands. Plus believe it or not a 3700 as an access point will cost much less then buying a dedicated access point. Plus you have the benefit of having a spare router should your main one fail which amazingly enough has happened to me.

Well isn't it when using 3700 as AP/Bridge only WEP is supported? And isn't WEP is really not much better than no seurity at all?
post #97 of 416
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PawPawDog View Post

Well isn't it when using 3700 as AP/Bridge only WEP is supported? And isn't WEP is really not much better than no seurity at all?

Not to my knowledge. But I only use WEP myself. I can confirm if this is something you really want to know.

Bob Silver
post #98 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post

To my knowledge it has not been dropped. I will confirm and report back.

Bob Silver
Netgear

Thanks. The TiVo support is likely a key factor in my considering this vs. the 3700.

Colin
post #99 of 416
I have a question for you Bob. Not to get all cheap and all with this talk of $100+ routers, but I am wondering what the differences are between the WNDR3700 and the WNDR3400.

The little checkmark rating deal on the box side just shows the 3400 as not supporting gigabit wired but everything else is the same. Are there any other substantial differences?

I don't use the wired ports on my router except to connect the internet to my switch so gig ports on the router don't do anything for me.

Also, how extensive is the network printer sharing via USB? As someone else stated, I've never been successful in getting our printer (connected to the basement PC) to be shared to other PCs on the network.

Thanks.

-Suntan
post #100 of 416
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

I have a question for you Bob. Not to get all cheap and all with this talk of $100+ routers, but I am wondering what the differences are between the WNDR3700 and the WNDR3400.

The little checkmark rating deal on the box side just shows the 3400 as not supporting gigabit wired but everything else is the same. Are there any other substantial differences?

I don't use the wired ports on my router except to connect the internet to my switch so gig ports on the router don't do anything for me.

Also, how extensive is the network printer sharing via USB? As someone else stated, I've never been successful in getting our printer (connected to the basement PC) to be shared to other PCs on the network.

Thanks.

-Suntan

Suntan,

The WNDR3400 is a close relative of the WNDR3700. It shares the same wifi technology and as you pointed out does not have the gigabit switch. The Readyshare USB sharing is the same as the the 3700. The other feature that the 3400 lacks is the video mode for the 5ghz band. This mode allows for prioritization of video packets on the wireless 5ghz band. It can detect when video is being transmitted automatically and help ensure it is not interrupted due to other traffic. Other then that the routers are equal.

So based on what you asked unless the video mode is important you will be happy with the 3400 and save some $$ too.

Now regarding the printer sharing. I too have had mixed results. I have not yet had an opportunity to try the 3800 yet so I cant comment. I have meetings at Netgear Friday so I will see if they have a unit I can try. But even if they do it will still be beta so who knows how well it will work.

In my case I have a multifunction printer which makes printer sharing that much harder. So I will probably be a good test case to see how well it works. Ill report back later once I have some real information.

Bob Silver
Netgear AV Consultant
post #101 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post

In my case I have a multifunction printer which makes printer sharing that much harder. So I will probably be a good test case to see how well it works. Ill report back later once I have some real information.

Bob Silver
Netgear AV Consultant

I too have a multifunction printer. Interested to know what you find.

One other question.

For these various routers that have internal antenna, as opposed to simple dipoles sticking out on a swivel, would you be able to give us an indication of the radiation pattern from them?

Even with multiple antennas, I'm assuming that they don't radiate in a perfect sphere. Knowing the general direction to point one of these internal antenna routers may help. Even if the suggestion is as simple as point the front of the router at the farthest wireless object.

Any insight?

-Suntan
post #102 of 416
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

I too have a multifunction printer. Interested to know what you find.

One other question.

For these various routers that have internal antenna, as opposed to simple dipoles sticking out on a swivel, would you be able to give us an indication of the radiation pattern from them?

Even with multiple antennas, I'm assuming that they don't radiate in a perfect sphere. Knowing the general direction to point one of these internal antenna routers may help. Even if the suggestion is as simple as point the front of the router at the farthest wireless object.

Any insight?

-Suntan

Netgear years back developed new antenna technology which they called the RangeMax product. That technology uses (I believe) 7 internal antennas that provided a very wide coverage pattern. That technology is what is used in all the current WNDR routers today. I dont know the exact coverage patterns but I can tell you from my experience it is quite good.

I use 2 3700 routers. I use one as my main router that sits under my desk in between to PC's and surrounded by other equipment. Clearly the worst of all possible places to put it. But even that works well. I get great coverage about 100 feet in all directions. The other 3700 is used as an access point. I place it on the far end of my house (I have a 3000 sq ft single story home). I didnt have to have it as my main 3700 covers that area but with the access point I get great coverage on the 5ghz band all over the house. And to that point 5ghz has far less range then the 2.4 ghz band. So that added coverage for me in that band was helpful for my ipad which I use on the 5 ghz band.

Lastly I just gave away my last dipole antenna router. While it was good in it's day it had no where near the coverage that the Netgear RangeMax technology has.

Bob Silver
Netgear AV Consultant
post #103 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post

...But I only use WEP myself.

You must place a lot of faith in your neighbors.
post #104 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcwilt View Post
You must place a lot of faith in your neighbors.
Meh. I place a lot of faith in the fact that most hoodlums would be drawn to the three or four SSIDs that have *no* protection at all before they would be interested in a WEP protected router

-Suntan
post #105 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
Meh. I place a lot of faith in the fact that most hoodlums would be drawn to the three or four SSIDs that have *no* protection at all before they would be interested in a WEP protected router

-Suntan
JFYI breaking WEP takes about a minute.
post #106 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcwilt View Post

JFYI breaking WEP takes about a minute.

Yeah, I know. But honestly, do you actually *know* how to do it?

Do you actually go around doing it in neighborhoods?

Finally, if you do both of the above, wouldn't you be more inclined to just jump on one of 3 or 4 completely unprotected ones that popped up instead?

The dead bolt on my front door takes less than a minute to break, but chances are the crook would go right to the house that had the unlocked door if all the houses on the block where advertising which ones were locked and which were unlocked

FWIW, I do use WPA. But I wouldn't stay up late at night with cold sweats if my network was only on WEP.

-Suntan
post #107 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

do you actually *know* how to do it?

Yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

Do you actually go around doing it in neighborhoods?

No.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

wouldn't you be more inclined to just jump on one of 3 or 4 completely unprotected

Yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

chances are the crook would go right to the house that had the unlocked

Depends on what they saw through the windows.

While the risk may not be great you might be arrested with all the attending hassles before you are cleared. It happened not too long ago as I am sure you saw in the news. Since it is simple to take what precautions you can why not do it?

http://geek.michaelgrace.org/2009/11...ested-or-sued/
post #108 of 416
I have pretty much decided to get the WNDR4000 due to reading this thread. I just sent back a D-Link DIR-855. I wanted the pretty LED display. I use my old DIR-655 now, after D-Link support said that the 30 second display saver could not be changed and they had no plans to alter that, this thread has convinced me to go Netgear. I was looking at Linksys E4200, for a few dollars more, but even though Amazon just added $10 to the N750 price, I still feel the N750 is a better buy. I'm more wireless leaning anyhow and both my Blu-ray and Sony TV support 5GHz. If you want a good picture of the N750:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Netgear-N7...ndingMethod=rr

And thanks, Bob, for being here.
post #109 of 416
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeKustra View Post

I have pretty much decided to get the WNDR4000 due to reading this thread. I just sent back a D-Link DIR-855. I wanted the pretty LED display. I use my old DIR-655 now, after D-Link support said that the 30 second display saver could not be changed and they had no plans to alter that, this thread has convinced me to go Netgear. I was looking at Linksys E4200, for a few dollars more, but even though Amazon just added $10 to the N750 price, I still feel the N750 is a better buy. I'm more wireless leaning anyhow and both my Blu-ray and Sony TV support 5GHz. If you want a good picture of the N750:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Netgear-N7...ndingMethod=rr

And thanks, Bob, for being here.

Joe

Well thank you and glad I was some help!

Bob Silver
post #110 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post

Joe

Well thank you and glad I was some help!

Bob Silver

Picked up the N750 from Walmart today. I powered off my cable modem (SB6120) then pulled the DIR-655 and gave it the old factory reset.

My desktop XP and Yamaha RX-V867 are wired. No issues there. I also have a BR, TV and Win7 laptop that are wireless. I used the push button and had the wireless working in about an hour. All my IP addresses had to change. I also wanted to have reservations for everything while keeping DHCP. That added to the setup time.

It works well. I still have the same benchmarks from various web sites. I've printed both manuals but need more time to read them. It came with the latest firmware also: 1.0.0.60_8.0.49.

And, like the D-Link, it does a lot of packet transfers when it is sitting idle. I wish I could stop that. The on-line interface is ok. Perhaps better than D-Link, and the documentation is ok too. It was worth the change.

Thanks for all the information here. This is a nice thread.

After a few hours a few comments:

DNLA server from USB drive works great. Something new to buy. I only have a flash drive connected now.

The WAN entry under Router Status shows 1Gb connection (it is) but the small icon on the desktop shows 100Mbs. D-Link indicated 1Gb. Not a problem. Blue led is good enough.

LAN setup has the same D-Link confusion on netbios names. Sometimes it takes the reservation name I entered and sometimes it tries to use a device name from the MAC address. Not a problem either.
post #111 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeKustra View Post

Picked up the N750 from Walmart today. I powered off my cable modem (SB6120) then pulled the DIR-655 and gave it the old factory reset.

Out of curiosity, why the need to switch from the DIR-655?

-Suntan
post #112 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

Out of curiosity, why the need to switch from the DIR-655?

-Suntan

5MHz for the Blu-ray/TV over the internet. Plus I have a serious case of new cow syndrome. I think I need therapy.
post #113 of 416
Bob, did you ever have a chance to find out about whether TiVo support is still a part of the WNDR3800?
post #114 of 416
Thread Starter 
So sorry for the delay. Yep. WNDR3800 will support TIVO and all TIVO models.

Bob
post #115 of 416
Great, thanks! Wonder why they stopped mentioning it in the materials? Oh well. I'll wait for that one, then :-)
post #116 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post

So sorry for the delay. Yep. WNDR3800 will support TIVO and all TIVO models.

Bob

Say Bob, if the stars align and you have a 1000Mbs connection to your internet interface, could you enable the icon in the notification area of your task bar? Mine still shows 100Mbs. I spent time with the Netgear support this morning and they indicated they would look at the issue. That was nice. They ended by telling me the free support cutoff times. Not as nice. I feel it's only a display issue, but it's still raining and I would rather talk to tech support than go outside.
post #117 of 416
I have a netgear rangemax router, this one
http://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-RangeM.../dp/B001UI4RTG

I have my apple tv & laptop connected via Ethernet

I get 30mb download on speedtest.net

Does it matter that i have a cheap router?

If i get a better router will i get faster speeds even tho im wired with ethernet ?
post #118 of 416
Doh! I was all set to buy a DGND3700. This is the one with an ADSL modem, 2xUSB, 128MB flash and 128MB RAM.

Now I'm considering the WNDR3800. (1xUSB, 16 MB flash and 64 MB RAM)

The reason for this is the idea of separating the access point (ADSL) and the core router.

I wasn't considering the constructs of a robust network with fail-over...at home. But it does have its merits.

More to think about.
post #119 of 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by TatorTot View Post
I have a netgear rangemax router, this one
http://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-RangeM.../dp/B001UI4RTG

I have my apple tv & laptop connected via Ethernet

I get 30mb download on speedtest.net

Does it matter that i have a cheap router?

If i get a better router will i get faster speeds even tho im wired with ethernet ?
No. Stick with what you've got.

-Suntan
post #120 of 416
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeKustra View Post

Say Bob, if the stars align and you have a 1000Mbs connection to your internet interface, could you enable the icon in the notification area of your task bar? Mine still shows 100Mbs. I spent time with the Netgear support this morning and they indicated they would look at the issue. That was nice. They ended by telling me the free support cutoff times. Not as nice. I feel it's only a display issue, but it's still raining and I would rather talk to tech support than go outside.

I am not aware of any changes in icons (at least in Win7) that reflect speed. All it shows is if you are connected. The routers all have lights that will tell you if it is a 10/100/1000 connection.
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