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DIY Projector lift Project

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I have been posting info about this project in various forums within AVS (without luck). I guess I am posting in the wrong area. So I am wondering if I post the link to the post I mught get some responses and advice. So here is a post:

DIY Projector Lift

So in that post i am trying to double check my math and regards to the amount of drop necessary. I am trying to decide between a 18" or a 24" linear actuator.

I looked at the measurements of the actuators and did not like the size, so I started looking the following electric motors:

Firgelli Electric Motors

I considering the electric motor in an attempt to shrink down the size of this project. The only thing is I am not sure where to begin to pickout:
1. the proper Electric motor
2. What sprockets to use.
3. I would certainly love help controlling the motor but I will be contacting Firgelli support on this issue.

Thanks
post #2 of 25
Thread Starter 
I am wondering if this electric motor would work
http://www.firgelliauto.com/product_...roducts_id=202

If so can you suggest a sprocket combination that would work:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#chain-sprockets/=bzog6a

Here is a link that I am looking at:

DIY Chain Projector lift

Although I would still want to maintain the same type of drop as as my first example but modify the design to accomodate a chain driven assembly. This would shrink the space required for the setup dramatically plus possibly cut down on cost.
post #3 of 25
Most digital PJ's are in the 10-25 lb range. The motor you selected will not work.

What you want is a scissors lift, which will be operated by a linear actuator. A modest size will get you the 18 inches of travel you need.

You can build a scissors lift using 80/20 components. I would say total cost would be about $350, including the actuator. Not a bad deal, since commercial lifts will set you back $3k+.

Don
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info. My original post is calling for a linear actuator. I was wondering if you would mind reading my original post to check and make sure my math is correct for the drop.
post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
So today I got up into the attic and did some measuring and general layout of mounting the linear actuator. Due to space purposes, I had to make a change to how I mount the Linear acuator. SO here is a picture of the new layout:



I am wondering if mounting the Linear Actuator in that manner with only one pulley will work???

I thank you in advance for any help you can provide
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
So I am looking at pulleys trying to figure one that might work. I found the following on Grainger:
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/RON...RV2?Pid=search

I am thinking that by mounting the actuator horizontally (like in the drawing) it will cause a pulley to sway, so I am trying to find a pulley that mounts on a solid bracket and just guides the rope around.

What do you think?
post #7 of 25
TV-
Check out this scissor lift made from 80/20 components:

http://www.eskimo.com/~wfd/html/imag...020lift450.jpg

Your pulley and cable approach will be able to raise and lower the PJ, but whats to keep it from spinning?

Normally, in a system such as this, you need Mechanical Advantage (MA).

If you understand how a block and tackle work, this is a good example.

The idea here is to reduce the load as seen at the motor shaft.

Designing such as system is not trivial. I suggest you follow the 80/20 example.

Don
post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somis View Post

TV-
Check out this scissor lift made from 80/20 components:

http://www.eskimo.com/~wfd/html/imag...020lift450.jpg

Your pulley and cable approach will be able to raise and lower the PJ, but whats to keep it from spinning?

Normally, in a system such as this, you need Mechanical Advantage (MA).

If you understand how a block and tackle work, this is a good example.

The idea here is to reduce the load as seen at the motor shaft.

Designing such as system is not trivial. I suggest you follow the 80/20 example.

Don

Thanks again for the input. I did not understand by what you meant when you stated "Your pulley and cable approach will be able to raise and lower the PJ, but whats to keep it from spinning?"

I am guessing you are referring to what make the linear actuator stop once it starts. The actuator has a built in limiter, that stops it when it reaches the end. I can also order a wiring kit where I can install a limiter switch that stops at a desired length.

Looking forward to hearing from you. Is there anymore to this 80/20 lift that I can read? I see the photo but would like to read about the process if possible.
post #9 of 25
Your drawing shows an actuator connected to the PJ via a cable. If the PJ is suspended soley by the cable, it is likely to rotate (yaw).

And unless you have the cable attached at the PJ's CG, it's likely to pitch.

This is why you need to build a scissors lift! This is the most stable platform,
and like I said, easily built with 80/20 components.

Don
post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 
I apologize for the confusion, there will be four ball bearing drawer slides guiding the projector lift up and down. Can you provide a web page about the 80/20 project
post #11 of 25
post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
I have been to the 80/20 website before but I was hoping to see a thread or web page describing build of the above projector lift. Including items like how it was automated etc.
post #13 of 25
You may want to call them and speak to an apps person. They are pretty helpful, and will probably be able to guide you through your design.

What you will need is:

2010 extrusions
1010 extrusions
four pivot nubs
four 1010 bearings
connecting hardware (T-nuts,Allen-head bolts, angle brackets)

Good luck!

Don
post #14 of 25
Here's a link to the web site for Firgelli Automation & a DIY design by Jonathan Hall for a projector lft. Click on the image of the design & a larger jpg image will open so you may read the details in the text. Hope this helps:

http://www.firgelliauto.com/home-aut...n-projects.php


John
post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDGTX View Post
Here's a link to the web site for Firgelli Automation & a DIY design by Jonathan Hall for a projector lft. Click on the image of the design & a larger jpg image will open so you may read the details in the text. Hope this helps:

http://www.firgelliauto.com/home-aut...n-projects.php


John
Thats funny you provided that link because that is what I am building but I was trying to make sure that my Pulley adjustment" (due to space) will work before all the part get ordered. I was going to order a 18" actuator but I am afraid that might not give me much leeway for error, so I am going to order a 24" and use a external limiter switch.
post #16 of 25
I viewed the lift design on the Firgelli web page, and although it will work, it takes up lots of space.

The scissor lift design, while being a little more expensive to build, requires only about 5 inches of depth when fully retracted.

Don
post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
So beyond the actual building of the 80/20 lift, how does a person automate that lift
post #18 of 25
I haven't used a linear actuator, but a simple method of control is with a DPDT (double-pole double -throw) toggle switch with a center off position.

The two center connections would go to your 12V power supply, while your connections to the actuator would be cross-connected to the 4 other terminals.

Throwing the switch one way would lower the PJ, while throwing it in the other position would raise it. The actuator has built-in limit switches to limit the travel in either direction.

Don
post #19 of 25
If the previous description seemed a little confusing, there is a video on the Firgelli website that explains how to connect a rocker switch to their actuator.

The switch is $18. Or, you can go with their electronic controller.

Don
post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 
I did not see the actuator attached to the lift. Interesting design
post #21 of 25
Now if you really wanna have some fun, wire the actuator to the Clapper. Clap up - clap down.

Don
post #22 of 25
Any update on this DIY project? The more ideas I see the easier it will be to make mine. Hope his thread necro works
post #23 of 25
8020 has an eBay store, you may find the lengths you need there...at a lower price. They will also cut those lengths down to your rerquirements.
post #24 of 25
I'm surprised that nobody has tried this. The 8020 website has all the components you will need, less the actuator. A little bit of R&D may be in order,
but it should be less than $350 when finished. Not bad when you consider commercial units are well over $2K.

Don
post #25 of 25
BTW when ordering from the 80/20 eBay store, try to order everything at once and follow the special ordering and payment instructions found at their storefront. This will allow them to send all of the parts together at a lower shipping cost.
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