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The New Master List of BASS in Movies with Frequency Charts - Page 365

post #10921 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post
 

yes I like it, please bring us more, how about Trance?

 

Trance (2013)

 

post #10922 of 16207
Thread Starter 
I have found that many 7.1 tracks are weaker in bass than 5.1 tracks(prometheus, dredd, jurassic park 1-3, good day to die hard, abraham lincol the vampire hunter comes to mind).rolleyes.gif
post #10923 of 16207
Turn up the LFE on your 7.1 tracks and you are set.
post #10924 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by wth718 View Post

My BR copy of Iron Man in the exact way. The lossy track was significantly louder than the lossless version. So much so that when I first had a receiver that could process the lossless track, I would choose the lossy one, anyway.

From memory wasn't there a a bug with the first Ironman (True HD track) that triggered "Late Night Mode" (not sure if that's what it's called) on some receivers?
post #10925 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonNo10 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by wth718 View Post

My BR copy of Iron Man in the exact way. The lossy track was significantly louder than the lossless version. So much so that when I first had a receiver that could process the lossless track, I would choose the lossy one, anyway.

From memory wasn't there a a bug with the first Ironman (True HD track) that triggered "Late Night Mode" (not sure if that's what it's called) on some receivers?
Not exactly a bug. It's an odd 'feature' in all Onkyo avrs. Any TrueHD track triggers the 'Late Night' setting.


Max
post #10926 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

Not exactly a bug. It's an odd 'feature' in all Onkyo avrs. Any TrueHD track triggers the 'Late Night' setting.


Max

It's also active when a Dolby Digital source is detected. I don't use it, but I thought I'd look it up. On p53
■Late Night
For Dolby Digital and Dolby Digital Plus sources, the
options are:
􀁠Off
􀁠Low:
Small reduction in dynamic range.
􀁠High:
Large reduction in dynamic range.
For Dolby TrueHD sources, the options are:
􀁠Auto:
The Late Night function is set to “On” or “Off”
automatically.
􀁠Off
􀁠On
Turn this setting on to reduce the dynamic range of Dolby
Digital material so that you can still hear quiet parts even
when listening at low volume levels—ideal for watching
movies late at night when you don’t want to disturb
anyone.
Note
• The effect of the Late Night function depends on the material that
you are playing and the intention of the original sound designer,
and with some material there will be little or no effect when you
select the different options.
• The Late Night function can be used only when the input source
is Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, or Dolby TrueHD.
• The Late Night function is set to “Off” when the AV receiver is
set to standby. For Dolby TrueHD sources, it will be set to
“Auto”.
• With Dolby TrueHD sources, the Late Night function cannot be
used when “TrueHD Loudness Management” is set to “Off”.
• The Late Night function cannot be used when “Dolby Volume”
is set to “On”.
post #10927 of 16207
Pacific rim does not seem to have ULF but it has lots of bass along with good visual effects. Acting was so so though.
post #10928 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonNo10 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by wth718 View Post

My BR copy of Iron Man in the exact way. The lossy track was significantly louder than the lossless version. So much so that when I first had a receiver that could process the lossless track, I would choose the lossy one, anyway.

From memory wasn't there a a bug with the first Ironman (True HD track) that triggered "Late Night Mode" (not sure if that's what it's called) on some receivers?
Not exactly a bug. It's an odd 'feature' in all Onkyo avrs. Any TrueHD track triggers the 'Late Night' setting.


Max

There was something, but I don't remember exactly what is was. The first time I watched it I wondered where all of this bass everyone was talking about was. The whole sound track seemed subdued. I did some searching at the time and found that others were having the same problem. I checked my Denon and the DRC was on. I turned it off and there was the sound track that I was expecting. I thought that I had saved some info on it, but I can't find anything.

I found it: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1043146/iron-man-blu-ray-9-30/150#post_14652389
Edited by Tom C - 10/7/13 at 6:58pm
post #10929 of 16207

Can "The Conjuring" save the day? Check out that 1hz peak and at 30hz, pretty loud.

 

The Conjuring (2013)

 

post #10930 of 16207
it seems as though horror movies always have effective use of the ULF
post #10931 of 16207
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKtheater View Post

Turn up the LFE on your 7.1 tracks and you are set.

You should compare prometheus 5.1 dub tracks to english 7.1 track.smile.gif Turning up sub level did help some, but its still far away from 5.1 tracks(they might be theatrical mixes), one good example is that scene in opening where that alien guy drinks that black goo and after that watches to sky where that spaceship fly away.
post #10932 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Fineberg View Post

it seems as though horror movies always have effective use of the ULF

Except that The Conjuring, in the graph above at least, has essentially no ULF. There's zero content from 20Hz to around 2 or 3Hz. That means there's no ULF. Also, the content at 20Hz is likely only one or two scenes at most because it doesn't raise the RMS value at that frequency much above its steep downward slope. See?




Instead, it looks to me like there's a significant HPF around 28-30Hz, and not much below that except filtered effects @ 20Hz, then nothing until very high level noise around DC. Who knows why the noise is there, but the rest is SOP for Hollywood these days. This is essentially what the loudness wars do, as bossobass so succinctly pointed out a month or two ago.
post #10933 of 16207
For instance, compare that graph of The Conjuring:




to a graph of The Frozen Ground, which I just measured and posted about yesterday in the Data-Bass.com thread.



RMS, or the red line, is really what you want to pay attention to when considering the movie's bass content as a whole. See how there's only about a 5dB difference from 5-20Hz? That's the bulk of what we care about when talking about ULF, not the loudest scenes (peaks, aka the green line) at 30Hz or noise that nobody can play back (because of blocking caps in their electronics) at DC or 1Hz.
post #10934 of 16207

BREAKING NEWS!!!:eek:

 

The Trouble with Star Trek into Darkness.

 

Everyone has been baffled by the different opinions on Star Trek. I can now explain my findings.

I live in the UK and we here in the international market have a different pressing of STID.

I imported the US one and compared it to the UK version and let me tell you there is night and day difference between the two!

The UK one has been encoded louder which explains the harshness and clipping that some people maybe experiencing and the US one is somewhat quieter. The bass is more aggressive on the UK track but US one is much more balanced and less aggressive at reference. But there is no harshness in the voices in the US version. Perhaps there is more high end in the US version and bass maybe filtered. I prefer the US version as it sounds astonishing at reference but on my system a touch tighter in the bass department.

 

I'm not sure which versions you all have but this is very interesting find indeed.

 

Why are there two different pressings around the world?

 

I await to hear your replies.


Edited by zero zero seven - 10/8/13 at 10:27am
post #10935 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by zero zero seven View Post

BREAKING NEWS!!!eek.gif

The Trouble with Star Trek into Darkness.

Everyone has been baffled by the different opinions on Star Trek. I can now explain my findings.
I live in the UK and we here in the international market have a different pressing of STID.
I imported the US one and compared it to the UK version and let me tell you there is night and day difference between the two!
The UK one has been encoded louder which explains the harshness and clipping that some people maybe experiencing and the US one is somewhat quieter. The bass is more aggressive on the UK track but US one is much more balanced and less aggressive at reference. But there is no harshness in the voices in the US version. Perhaps there is more high end in the US version and bass maybe filtered. I prefer the US version as it sounds astonishing at reference but on my system a touch tighter in the bass department.

I'm not sure which versions you all have but this is very interesting find indeed.

Why are there two different pressings around the world?

I await to hear your replies.
Many/most of the complaints here are about the US version. I shudder to think what a worse version must sound like.


Max
post #10936 of 16207
Is the complaint only with a specific mix on the disc or is it all of them?
post #10937 of 16207

Monsters, Inc. (2001)

 

 

 

 

Monsters University (2013)

 

post #10938 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Is the complaint only with a specific mix on the disc or is it all of them?
If you were asking me, the complaint is with the main lossless audio track on STID. It's recorded loud, but more importantly, the high levels it's recorded at inherently have clipping and distortion in the track. This is encoded in the audio and is noticeable even at lower playback levels, but is glaringly apparent at moderate to high playback volumes (especially to folks sensitive to clipping with a very resolving system). You can hear it in the harshness of the sound in many of the loud scenes, in stark contrast to something like Oblivion for instance.


Max
post #10939 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

Many/most of the complaints here are about the US version. I shudder to think what a worse version must sound like.


Max

biggrin.gif
post #10940 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Is the complaint only with a specific mix on the disc or is it all of them?
If you were asking me, the complaint is with the main lossless audio track on STID. It's recorded loud, but more importantly, the high levels it's recorded at inherently have clipping and distortion in the track. This is encoded in the audio and is noticeable even at lower playback levels, but is glaringly apparent at moderate to high playback volumes (especially to folks sensitive to clipping with a very resolving system). You can hear it in the harshness of the sound in many of the loud scenes, in stark contrast to something like Oblivion for instance.


Max

Thanks for that. Its odd timing since I was hoping to unwrap this one and watch it tonight, maybe I'll just try and start on whatever 5.1 mix they have and bypass the problematic mix. I wonder if their lossless is the same as the theater mix or if they did the same thing as they did on Oz where they created a new 'near field' mix.
post #10941 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Just to clarify the lossy and lossless were indeed different mixes in Oz. The lossless is 7.1 DTS and the Lossy is 5.1 DD. Also, the lossless has a 'nearfield' adjective next to it and the lossy does not.
I may be making some assumptions here, but... does anyone else find it strange that the lossy 5.1 mix would be the theatrical mix, and the lossless 7.1 mix the nearfield mix? It seems like the whole point of lossless is so we can get exactly what was created for theatres. It also seems like part of the nearfield mix is to make the movie sound/work better for low-end equipment. But low-end gains no benefit from lossless. In fact it takes a VERY nice system to discern any benefit of lossless. So it seems to me like the lossless track should be packed with as much ULF, Dynamic Range as possible, and of course more channels, and then the lossy track should be the nearfield mix with fewer channels and less ULF and dynamic range so it’s more HTIAB-friendly.
post #10942 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by [KYA]Mega View Post

I may be making some assumptions here, but... does anyone else find it strange that the lossy 5.1 mix would be the theatrical mix, and the lossless 7.1 mix the nearfield mix? It seems like the whole point of lossless is so we can get exactly what was created for theatres. It also seems like part of the nearfield mix is to make the movie sound/work better for low-end equipment. But low-end gains no benefit from lossless. In fact it takes a VERY nice system to discern any benefit of lossless. So it seems to me like the lossless track should be packed with as much ULF, Dynamic Range as possible, and of course more channels, and then the lossy track should be the nearfield mix with fewer channels and less ULF and dynamic range so it’s more HTIAB-friendly.

You'd think....

JSS
post #10943 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrkazador View Post

Monsters, Inc. (2001)






Monsters University (2013)


Not that they aren't appreciated, but what's with the new graph format? I just got used to the other one!
post #10944 of 16207
The PVA graphs is of the entire movie so it's easy to see how much lfe there is.

Easier to compare movies.

Takes minutes to scan a movie.

No roll off in the low end.

Waterfalls are nice to look at but take too much time to find the exact scenes to capture.
post #10945 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrkazador View Post

The PVA graphs is of the entire movie so it's easy to see how much lfe there is.

Easier to compare movies.

Takes minutes to scan a movie.

No roll off in the low end.

Waterfalls are nice to look at but take too much time to find the exact scenes to capture.
I don't get it. Those lines are supposed to represent the whole movie? Then what happens to the line if there is a second spot in the movie that dips to 20hz? Sorry if I'm being a little slow.
post #10946 of 16207
After reading quite a few mediocre reviews on WWZ, I finally decided to take a chance and give it a spin. To my surprise, I actually enjoyed the movie quite a bit.

The most surprising however was the LFE sweep during the grenade scene. I was at -10 below reference, running a few db's hot, and that sweep was one of the better ones I've heard in a while. Rolled all the way through the room causing my walls and ceiling to creak and pop. Scared the hell out of me to say the least, lol. biggrin.gif
post #10947 of 16207

Funnily enough it is the UK version of STID which appears to have the issues when compared to the US version which appears to be fine on my system. Clearly there are different batches floating around.

post #10948 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by bass addict View Post

After reading quite a few mediocre reviews on WWZ, I finally decided to take a chance and give it a spin. To my surprise, I actually enjoyed the movie quite a bit.

The most surprising however was the LFE sweep during the grenade scene. I was at -10 below reference, running a few db's hot, and that sweep was one of the better ones I've heard in a while. Rolled all the way through the room causing my walls and ceiling to creak and pop. Scared the hell out of me to say the least, lol. biggrin.gif

Aw crap just swiped the card on eBay, gotta hear this on my new subs smile.gif
post #10949 of 16207
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambesolman View Post

I don't get it. Those lines are supposed to represent the whole movie? Then what happens to the line if there is a second spot in the movie that dips to 20hz? Sorry if I'm being a little slow.

The green line will show the highest peak from the entire movie.

Red line is average of the entire movie. More lfe in a movie, higher the average.

I'm not very good at explaining these things.
post #10950 of 16207
Elysium is loaded to the gills.

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