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Samsung D7000 & D8000 Settings/Calibration Thread - Page 106

post #3151 of 3298
OK, all.

I've decided that I'm going to maybe let Best Buy calibrate my PN59D8000. My reason for that is because it's free since I'm a premier silver rewards member.

I do, however, have concerns about letting them calibrate my TV, so I want to make sure I ask all of the right questions beforehand.

I've done a ton of reading on this website in threads related to best buy calibrations, and it seems as though the results really depend on who's doing the calibration.

Could you please help me out with providing questions that I should ask to ensure I'm getting a full isf calibration?

I did ask if the calibration is being done by an isf certified specialist, and they told me yes.

What I don't know is:
1) what equipment they're going to use. What should they use?
2) if they're planning to adjust my greyscale, colors, gamma, and everything else.
3) how long they're planning to spend calibrating it. How long should they spend calibrating it while doing a good job? I'm assuming anything less than 2 hours means they didn't do everything.

Thanks in advance for your responses.
Edited by Sweetmeat - 12/23/12 at 9:41pm
post #3152 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post

OK, all.

I've decided that I'm going to maybe let Best Buy calibrate my PN59D8000. My reason for that is because it's free since I'm a premier silver rewards member.

I do, however, have concerns about letting them calibrate my TV, so I want to make sure I ask all of the right questions beforehand.

I've done a ton of reading on this website in threads related to best buy calibrations, and it seems as though the results really depend on who's doing the calibration.

Could you please help me out with providing questions that I should ask to ensure I'm getting a full isf calibration?

I did ask if the calibration is being done by an isf certified specialist, and they told me yes.

What I don't know is:
1) what equipment they're going to use. What should they use?
2) if they're planning to adjust my greyscale, colors, gamma, and everything else.
3) how long they're planning to spend calibrating it. How long should they spend calibrating it while doing a good job? I'm assuming anything less than 2 hours means they didn't do everything.

Thanks in advance for your responses.

What you can be sure of is that they will probably lack adequate knowledge, talent, time, and equipment to do the job properly. They are working on a time limit (usually about 90 minutes according to reports) and the amount of time they are given is less than what a true professional would spend setting up and taking initial measurements. It sounds like they are using entry-level equipment and software with workflows that basically walk them through the process. So, they aren't really getting their hands dirty. They may adjust this setting or that setting without truly understanding how those controls work.

Then again...it's free in your case. So long as they stay out of the service menu, they can't do any real harm.
post #3153 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post

OK, all.
I've decided that I'm going to maybe let Best Buy calibrate my PN59D8000. My reason for that is because it's free since I'm a premier silver rewards member.
I do, however, have concerns about letting them calibrate my TV, so I want to make sure I ask all of the right questions beforehand.
I've done a ton of reading on this website in threads related to best buy calibrations, and it seems as though the results really depend on who's doing the calibration.
Could you please help me out with providing questions that I should ask to ensure I'm getting a full isf calibration?
I did ask if the calibration is being done by an isf certified specialist, and they told me yes.
What I don't know is:
1) what equipment they're going to use. What should they use?
2) if they're planning to adjust my greyscale, colors, gamma, and everything else.
3) how long they're planning to spend calibrating it. How long should they spend calibrating it while doing a good job? I'm assuming anything less than 2 hours means they didn't do everything.
Thanks in advance for your responses.

Yeah, they shouldn't need to go to the service menu, at all.

I would ask them what meter they are using. Also, see if they will give you a report that will show before/after gamma, greyscale and color luminance.
post #3154 of 3298
I've given up calibrating by eye after many years..i thought I could get it better like skin tones but its absolutely impossible to get everything right.

My best way is using and comparing tv to ipad1 which is around 7000 k I believe.Just did it and it looks very good.my procedure is in the Samsung e450 thread.If your bored I'd be interested to see what you think,and Could you tell me if I'm doing something Obviously wrong.

Thanks,enjoyed reading this thread and picked up a few tips
post #3155 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post

OK, all.
I've decided that I'm going to maybe let Best Buy calibrate my PN59D8000. My reason for that is because it's free since I'm a premier silver rewards member.
I do, however, have concerns about letting them calibrate my TV, so I want to make sure I ask all of the right questions beforehand.
I've done a ton of reading on this website in threads related to best buy calibrations, and it seems as though the results really depend on who's doing the calibration.
Could you please help me out with providing questions that I should ask to ensure I'm getting a full isf calibration?
I did ask if the calibration is being done by an isf certified specialist, and they told me yes.
What I don't know is:
1) what equipment they're going to use. What should they use?
2) if they're planning to adjust my greyscale, colors, gamma, and everything else.
3) how long they're planning to spend calibrating it. How long should they spend calibrating it while doing a good job? I'm assuming anything less than 2 hours means they didn't do everything.
Thanks in advance for your responses.

I had them calibrate my TV (also a premier silver member). They were in and out in 40 minutes, doing both Cal-Day and Cal-Night settings after I asked them to enable those settings in the Service Menu.

I was posting these on another forum, so see if any of these help:

Quote:
The Geek Squad guy is sitting down calibrating it right now. Honestly, I'm not sure if I'll stick to what he uses, especially if he doesn't go into the color space or anything like that, then it's not really a full-on calibration. At least he is knowledgeable, but I just don't think he's using all of the equipment that he can be.

EDIT: Nevermind, now he's jumping into the other stuff. Even still, he turned on Full Range RGB on the PS3. I don't think many, if any, plasmas do the full 0-255 spectrum, do they? I thought only PC monitors did that.

Anyway, as long as everything he does is from a technical standpoint and not an "eye appealing" standpoint for justification, then I can make any such "eye appealing" tweaks afterward.
Quote:
Well, he's already gone. He was here for forty minutes. Here was what he did/changed:

* I asked for CAL-DAY/CAL-NIGHT options, and he enabled them.

CAL-DAY

Cell Light: 20
Contrast: 95
Brightness: 36
Sharpness: 22
Color: 47
Tint (G/R): 50/50
Color Space: Native
White Balance: 28, 25, 21, 3, 30, 16

CAL-NIGHT (assume any figures I don't re-state are the same as CAL-DAY)


Cell Light: 8
Contrast: 96
Brightness: 35
Sharpness: 25
Tint (G/R): 49/51
White Balance: 25, 25, 26, 8, 35, 14

Honestly... the whites look more accurate I guess, but I'm feeling a green push, maybe just something that I'm not used to. Anyway, it makes me want to call up Chad B. right now, knowing that he'd be here for significantly longer, doing other things with my television.

Sharpness not <10 is already alarming for me, IMO.
Quote:
Yeah, like I said, he seemed knowledgeable when he was actually talking (not as in he sounded smart, but he knew what he was talking about), but his time spent here and the settings made didn't reflect that at all.
Quote:
The problem is that I can't confirm on any technical level whether my television has better accuracy than it previously had, not just with color but with everything else as well.

If it's free? There is no downside. If you don't like it, keep your previous settings written down somewhere and just put them back in. In fact, I still have my previous settings in Movie mode, because these new settings are in CAL-DAY and CAL-NIGHT. Personally, the whites are much purer with this Geek Squad guy's settings, but I feel like there's a bit of a green tint shade pulled over my screen. Probably just because it's something I'm not used to, but I still have no idea either way.

At the same time, I feel like next year I want to give Chad B. a call, just so I can ensure not only accuracy, but precision. I'm sure he could educate me a bit more on everything that goes on with his tweaks.

At any rate, I'm "satisfied," but feel like I could find myself more satisfied. The fact that this was free meant it was no harm on my end, so I really could only recommend this to Premier Silver members. If you want to pay for calibration, you might as well go all in. Assurance is much more valuable than belief of assurance.
Quote:
I tweaked them, but mostly just the white balance settings. My whites never really looked white after the guy left; they just looked far too green. That wasn't being unaccustomed to the new look, either. His measurements were just off.

Otherwise, I stuck with his base, did my own tweaks, and prefer them to my old settings. If I had the option between paying a cent for BBY calibration and having Chad B., I would go with Chad. Because it's free, it won't hurt you one bit. Just keep your old settings stored somewhere, and then compare and contrast at the end of the day. Just don't expect a revelation from the guy since he doesn't touch any of the 10p white balance stuff.

If I can find my settings he provided me earlier in this thread, I'll compare them to what I changed them to just to show how many/little changes were actually made.
Quote:
Yup. Here's what he originally had for my Samsung PN59D7000...


HDMI Black Level: Normal (meant for full 0-255 RGB color space, which plasma screens aren't meant to handle)
Digital Noise Filter: Auto
MPEG Noise Filter: Auto

CAL-DAY
Cell Light: 20
Contrast: 95
Brightness: 36
Sharpness: 22
Color: 47
Tint (G/R): 50/50
Color Space: Native
White Balance (RGB Offset/Gain): 28, 25, 21, 3, 30, 16

CAL-NIGHT
Cell Light: 8
Contrast: 96
Brightness: 35
Sharpness: 25
Color: 47
Tint (G/R): 49/51
Color Space: Native
White Balance: 25, 25, 26, 8, 35, 14



Here's what mine are now set at...


HDMI Black Level: Low (clips to limited 16-239 RGB color spectrum, which is much more suitable)
Digital Noise Filter: Off
MPEG Noise Filter: Off

CAL-DAY (for TV viewing and gaming)
Cell Light: 20
Contrast: 95
Brightness: 55
Sharpness: 6
Color: 50
Tint (G/R): 50/50
Color Space: Native
White Balance: 26, 21, 21, 3, 28, 16

CAL-NIGHT (for watching movies)
Cell Light: 8
Contrast: 93
Brightness: 59
Sharpness: 0
Color: 48
Tint (G/R): 50/50
Color Space: Native
White Balance: 25, 25, 26, 8, 27, 15



Believe me when I say that, as small as some of these changes look, they make big differences between how he left them and how they are now.
post #3156 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by muffinmcfluffin View Post

I had them calibrate my TV (also a premier silver member). They were in and out in 40 minutes, doing both Cal-Day and Cal-Night settings after I asked them to enable those settings in the Service Menu.
I was posting these on another forum, so see if any of these help:

I believe Cell light should be at 20 for Plasmas and you should adjust contrast/brightness to get the luminance you need for your lighting conditions. So, a cell light of "8" jumps out at me. Also, his brightness settings seem REALLY low. I have the same set and mine is consistently measured in the mid to high 50's. The changes you made were good. Turning off all the noise filters would have been 101 level stuff...surprised he didn't do that.

What meter and software did he use? Did he do a 10 point white balance adjustment? Adjust color space or leave at auto? Do they give you a summary sheet of the meter readings before/after? 40 minutes is real quick. It takes me 30 minutes to warm up my TV with the meter! Then, even though I now know what I am doing, it can take me hours to tweak and adjust.

Oh, and, Merry Christmas, everyone! smile.gif
Edited by Rob67 - 12/24/12 at 5:51pm
post #3157 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob67 View Post

I believe Cell light should be at 20 for Plasmas and you should adjust contrast/brightness to get the luminance you need for your lighting conditions. So, a cell light of "8" jumps out at me.

For "Cal-Night," he asked me to look at the cell light settings and what would be best in a pitch black room. I said I liked 11, but he said pitch black rooms generally run a cell light between 6 and 8, so I just said 8.

Honestly, it looks really good. Keep in mind that this is for a pitch-black room.
Quote:
Also, his brightness settings seem REALLY low. I have the same set and mine is consistently measured in the mid to high 50's. The changes you made were good.

You'll have to remember that he had HDMI Black Level at Normal, which means everything was incredibly lighter. He lowered the brightness to compensate. Switching HDMI Black Level back to Low means you have to turn it up again.
Quote:
Turning off all the noise filters would have been 101 level stuff...surprised he didn't do that.

I don't think he even really looked at it. Because he went into the service menu, he reset everything and kind of forgot to go back to some options. Whatever, I guess. At least I know what I'm doing. wink.gif
Quote:
What meter and software did he use? Did he do a 10 point white balance adjustment? Adjust color space or leave at auto? Do they give you a summary sheet of the meter readings before/after? 40 minutes is real quick. It takes me 30 minutes to warm up my TV with the meter! Then, even though I now know what I am doing, it can take me hours to tweak and adjust.

I don't know what his gadgets were called; I didn't bother asking.

No 10-point white balance adjustments. Again, I really want Chad B. to come to California haha. Color space was set to Native.

No summary sheet. I've seen them before, and would have gladly liked one. Unfortunately, I don't think they do that at Geek Squad.

40 minutes seemed incredibly fast, especially since I called in sick for work that day because they reserved a four hour block (and he didn't come until two hours into said block). It seemed kind of rude. He did call about an hour before arriving and asked me to make sure my TV was on though, which I guess is the "warming up" thing you're referring to.

I swear, Geek Squad ISF calibration is only good as a free service, and even then you should hold onto your original settings just in case, plus be prepared to make tweaks afterward.
Quote:
Oh, and, Merry Christmas, everyone! smile.gif

You too!
post #3158 of 3298
The only reason I mention cell light is that I read (in this thread, I believe) that cell light should always be left at max in plasmas and that you should adjust your luminance or brightness using the other controls. Something to do with the way the technology works. I know it affects the white balance settings. I had to re-calibrate mine as I had the cell light originally set to 16 (in a pitch black theater room). Bumped it up to 20 and then brought down luminance with the rest of the calibration. wink.gif
post #3159 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob67 View Post

The only reason I mention cell light is that I read (in this thread, I believe) that cell light should always be left at max in plasmas and that you should adjust your luminance or brightness using the other controls. Something to do with the way the technology works. I know it affects the white balance settings. I had to re-calibrate mine as I had the cell light originally set to 16 (in a pitch black theater room). Bumped it up to 20 and then brought down luminance with the rest of the calibration. wink.gif

Very interesting. I might have to consider trying that, but I even try switching to my Cal-Day settings while watching movies, and don't prefer where the whites are peaking, at least on an eye-straining level or what have you. If a professional calibrator says so, then I'm fine with it. Until then, I won't yet know how to calibrate it that way, so I'll leave it as is.
post #3160 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post

OK, all.
I've decided that I'm going to maybe let Best Buy calibrate my PN59D8000. My reason for that is because it's free since I'm a premier silver rewards member.
I do, however, have concerns about letting them calibrate my TV, so I want to make sure I ask all of the right questions beforehand.
I've done a ton of reading on this website in threads related to best buy calibrations, and it seems as though the results really depend on who's doing the calibration.
Could you please help me out with providing questions that I should ask to ensure I'm getting a full isf calibration?
I did ask if the calibration is being done by an isf certified specialist, and they told me yes.
What I don't know is:
1) what equipment they're going to use. What should they use?
2) if they're planning to adjust my greyscale, colors, gamma, and everything else.
3) how long they're planning to spend calibrating it. How long should they spend calibrating it while doing a good job? I'm assuming anything less than 2 hours means they didn't do everything.
Thanks in advance for your responses.

I am also a Best Buy platinum member and I decided to have Best Buy calibrate my TV for free. I figured what did I have to lose? What a mistake that was. He was at my house about 40 minutes. After he left, I noticed that the picture had a pinkish tint to it. On the CBS NFL pre-game show, Dan Marino's face looked like he was either constantly flushing or was extremely angry all the time. I had D-Nice come and calibrate the TV. He told me that the Best Buy tech calibrated the TV with no greens at all. Yes, the green level was zero. I could see it on the chart he gave me after he finished calibarting the TV. That explained the problem. Now the TV looks great.

Moral of the story for me. I wouldn't let Best Buy calibrate my TV again even if it was free.
post #3161 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by gary50 View Post

I am also a Best Buy platinum member and I decided to have Best Buy calibrate my TV for free. I figured what did I have to lose? What a mistake that was. He was at my house about 40 minutes. After he left, I noticed that the picture had a pinkish tint to it. On the CBS NFL pre-game show, Dan Marino's face looked like he was either constantly flushing or was extremely angry all the time. I had D-Nice come and calibrate the TV. He told me that the Best Buy tech calibrated the TV with no greens at all. Yes, the green level was zero. I could see it on the chart he gave me after he finished calibarting the TV. That explained the problem. Now the TV looks great.
Moral of the story for me. I wouldn't let Best Buy calibrate my TV again even if it was free.

At least he gave you a chart.
post #3162 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by gary50 View Post

I am also a Best Buy platinum member and I decided to have Best Buy calibrate my TV for free. I figured what did I have to lose? What a mistake that was. He was at my house about 40 minutes. After he left, I noticed that the picture had a pinkish tint to it. On the CBS NFL pre-game show, Dan Marino's face looked like he was either constantly flushing or was extremely angry all the time. I had D-Nice come and calibrate the TV. He told me that the Best Buy tech calibrated the TV with no greens at all. Yes, the green level was zero. I could see it on the chart he gave me after he finished calibarting the TV. That explained the problem. Now the TV looks great.
Moral of the story for me. I wouldn't let Best Buy calibrate my TV again even if it was free.

Sadly this is pretty common, they have sufficient equipment I think where they are lacking is training, experience and time constraints.
post #3163 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by muffinmcfluffin View Post

At least he gave you a chart.

Just to clarify, I could see it on the chart that D-Nice gave me after he calibrated the TV. D-Nice gave me "before" and "after" charts and I could see zero green level on the one that was previously calibrated by the Best Buy rep.
post #3164 of 3298
Man, I'm always astonished at the level of incompetence with these BB calibrations. Forget FREE, they couldn't even pay ME to have them come and adjust my set.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob67 View Post

The only reason I mention cell light is that I read (in this thread, I believe) that cell light should always be left at max in plasmas and that you should adjust your luminance or brightness using the other controls. Something to do with the way the technology works. I know it affects the white balance settings. I had to re-calibrate mine as I had the cell light originally set to 16 (in a pitch black theater room). Bumped it up to 20 and then brought down luminance with the rest of the calibration. wink.gif

Yes, don't recall the exact explanation, but a cell setting of anything less than 20 apparently only makes picture fluctuations worse on a plasma. This was confirmed by a Samsung insider. There is just one potential downside to leaving cell at 20 - for people who prefer a darker picture or for lower peak white calibrations (such as a pitch black room), the 10 point controls may no longer match up properly, so getting everything perfectly aligned becomes more difficult. Zoyd found a way around this by reducing the sub-contrast value in the SM such that the desired peak white is obtained at a contrast of ~95 - this maintains the alignment.
post #3165 of 3298
With respect to the irregularity of the 10 point controls at low peak outputs:

For the D7000 at least, reducing the sub-contrast in the service menu WB, only the CAL Contrast settings show a change. The Movie mode Contrast setting is not affected.

That is not to say however that it is impossible to get a good calibration at low peak outputs. Chad B has posted a terrific slide for determining where the 10 point controls are shifted. I've attached his slide (converted to jpg format) and some results for a 20 ftL peak white.




Grayscale:



Gamma bt1886:



Gamut:



EDIT: Cell light at 20 and Contrast at 64 for the above calibration charts.

Larry
Edited by LarryInRI - 12/26/12 at 4:32pm
post #3166 of 3298
Quote:
Hello Jeff, I currently dont have any equipment to calibrate my pn51d7000, so I tried different settings from this forum. Your settings posted provide the best results for my TV. One question, have you "improved" such settings? Do you still use the last settings you posted? Thanks in advance.
.

Hello, Enrique.

No improvements since March, but maybe soon. Cell light 20 issue begs an update. May also change voltages and calibrate ACD/WB. Don't know when, though.
Edited by SeeJeffRun - 12/30/12 at 7:48am
post #3167 of 3298
You guys getting "brightness pops"? Mine went away with the firmware fix, but now are back, vengefully. "Cinema Smooth" isn't fixing them, just has them occurring in different spots, which is obviously weird.

This whole thing is weird. Totally killing my buzz.
post #3168 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI View Post

Willie,
Right. The 10 point regions line up at higher Contrast level settings. If the peak white output is too high for you with Cell at 20, you can reduce Cell a few ticks without destroying the 10 point settings. (This is what Chad B does. That's why he created the chart to determine where the 10 point controls are active.) There is a small price to pay when ABL kicks in but it really is a very small price.
EDIT: I wasn't very clear. Chad created the chart in order to keep the Cell setting high when a lower Contrast is used. However, the price to pay by lowering the Cell setting with a relatively high Contrast setting is acceptable. Acceptable to me but maybe not to someone like Doug Blackburn or even zoyd. That may be because I can't take anything over a peak white of over 30 ftL in a dark room and even a relatively low value of 27 ftL is just fine for me.
Don't knock yourself out over cyan and green with the D7000. It's the nature of the beast that these colors cannot be adjusted to perfection. Unlike the D8000, these colors will always have an x value that is too low and no matter what is done there is no way to bring them in line. What you have now is just fine. Don't forget to readjust the gamut after fixing the grayscale tracking (RGB balance.)
If you want to continue this discussion, I suggest that we take it over to the D series calibration/settings thread.
Larry

(Discussion moved from general D7000 thread.)

Thanks again, Larry. I'm going to start over, the peak white when contrast is at 87 is just too much for me. On my non-calibrated set I prefer cell 20, contrast 70 and gamma +1 so I'll use those for this next round. I realize that it's going to be more difficult but I'll try to use the chart to help me with the 10 point adjustments. Also, thanks for your advice regarding the colors. I won't waste too much time on green and cyan then but I may try to get the others more in line, they all seemed to still have some room for adjustment.

I'm kind of glad I only bought the tutorial version of the Calman bundle. For now multi point grayscale and gamut is more than enough. I don't even want to think about having to deal with components beyond those :-)
post #3169 of 3298
Willie,

A few tips before starting with Cell = 20 and Contrast = 70:

1. Set everything related to calibration back to the factory default. White balance settings = 25. All 10 point region sets = 0. Custom color space settings = reset values. Gamma = +1 (for about 2.2 on the D7000.) Color = 50 (you'll probably end up at 48 or 49.) Tint = 50/50 (you'll probably end up at 51/49.)

2. Get the absolute best grayscale tracking using only the white balance controls.

3. Smooth out the grayscale using the 10 point controls. Try not to go more than 3 or 4 ticks max from 0.

Attack the gamma value and curve next and finally the gamut. But right now, I think you have enough to do.smile.gif


Larry
post #3170 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI View Post

Willie,
A few tips before starting with Cell = 20 and Contrast = 70:
1. Set everything related to calibration back to the factory default. White balance settings = 25. All 10 point region sets = 0. Custom color space settings = reset values. Gamma = +1 (for about 2.2 on the D7000.) Color = 50 (you'll probably end up at 48 or 49.) Tint = 50/50 (you'll probably end up at 51/49.)
2. Get the absolute best grayscale tracking using only the white balance controls.
3. Smooth out the grayscale using the 10 point controls. Try not to go more than 3 or 4 ticks max from 0.
Attack the gamma value and curve next and finally the gamut. But right now, I think you have enough to do.smile.gif
Larry

Oh, I definitely have enough to do. Thank you so much for your help!

One thing: on my set color needs to be at 51. I know this isn't usual for the D7000 but both the blue-only mode and a filter confirms it.

I'll attach new screenshots here when I'm done. I expect it'll be around 2015 smile.gif
post #3171 of 3298
To my surprise I found the grayscale adjustment easier this time around, with the lower contrast setting (I didn't go all the way down to 70 though). Although the 10 point controls were shifted, I was helped by the advice to make it as perfect as possible with the white balance controls first. I spent more time on that piece and it definitely paid off when I got to the 10 point adjustments. The colors are still a bit off but I'm not very concerned. It's obvious to me that a proper grayscale is much more important for picture quality than super accurate colors when viewing real content. I'm very pleased with the result, the light output is perfect for my viewing conditions, and I'll probably leave it like this for a while.

My tutorial version of Calman doesn't contain workflows for gamma curve and I'm also not able to measure ftL.

Basics:
Cell 20
Contrast 73
Brightness 59
Color 51
Tint 51/49
Gamma +1


post #3172 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by willieconway View Post

Oh, I definitely have enough to do. Thank you so much for your help!
One thing: on my set color needs to be at 51. I know this isn't usual for the D7000 but both the blue-only mode and a filter confirms it.
I'll attach new screenshots here when I'm done. I expect it'll be around 2015 smile.gif

Hello smile.gif, I've talked to Tom Huffman a respected calibrator and he told me that you don't need to adjust your color/tint settings. Just use the CMS .
post #3173 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by hungro View Post

Hello smile.gif, I've talked to Tom Huffman a respected calibrator and he told me that you don't need to adjust your color/tint settings. Just use the CMS .

Yes, I saw that topic being discussed here and I didn't see a definitive conclusion. Seeing how it's dead simple to set them, I'd rather do it though. Thanks!
post #3174 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by willieconway View Post

Yes, I saw that topic being discussed here and I didn't see a definitive conclusion. Seeing how it's dead simple to set them, I'd rather do it though. Thanks!

I am using Chromapure and I use the color decoding module. Set color so that I have the least error in Red luminance. Then I set tint so I have the least error in luminance for Cyan.
Edited by hungro - 1/6/13 at 5:44pm
post #3175 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by hungro View Post

Hello smile.gif, I've talked to Tom Huffman a respected calibrator and he told me that you don't need to adjust your color/tint settings. Just use the CMS .

On the D7000 if the tint control is not used it is just about impossible to get magenta lined up properly.

Larry
post #3176 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by hungro View Post

I am using Chromapure and I use the color management module. Set color so that I have the least error in Red luminance. Then I set tint so I have the least error in luminance for Cyan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI View Post

On the D7000 if the tint control is not used it is just about impossible to get magenta lined up properly.
Larry


Hmmm...still learning from you guys. Will have to go in and do a touch up soon. smile.gif
post #3177 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI View Post

On the D7000 if the tint control is not used it is just about impossible to get magenta lined up properly.
Larry

Do you also use the color controls along with adjusting the CMS? I have a d6500 and set color using the color decoding module in chromapure. I set Red so that it has the least amount of error in luminance and then set the tint control for Cyan so this also has the lowest error in luminance. Then adjust the colors using the CMS. I know that Tom Huffman mentioned it is not necessary to fiddle with the color/tint control and only use the CMS.
Edited by hungro - 1/6/13 at 6:15pm
post #3178 of 3298
I thought something was off with skin tones after my calibration here. Specifically, it looked to me as if they had a hint of green. So I decided to redo it, this time with contrast at 70, but I'm having a few problems. The point where the 10 point shifts, e.g. between 6 and 7, is very hard to get right because I end up with one interval that no control can impact much. A couple of questions for the more seasoned folks here:

  • When doing the white balance (2 point), does it matter if I do the gains or the offsets first?
  • I'm on my third 64D7000 panel (one developed flashing pixels, the next had pink banding). On all three panels I ended up with the color control at 51 after using the blue only mode. Shouldn't that vary from panel to panel? I'm just curious since 49-50 is the most common setting on the D series.

Edited by willieconway - 1/8/13 at 10:48am
post #3179 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by hungro View Post

Do you also use the color controls along with adjusting the CMS? I have a d6500 and set color using the color decoding module in chromapure. I set Red so that it has the least amount of error in luminance and then set the tint control for Cyan so this also has the lowest error in luminance. Then adjust the colors using the CMS. I know that Tom Huffman mentioned it is not necessary to fiddle with the color/tint control and only use the CMS.

In a perfect world, theory would apply perfectly to hardware. But it is not a perfect world. CMS controls among TVs of different models behave differently. Color decoding behaves differently. The D7000 requires a slight changes to Tint and/or Color to get the best gamut.

An overly saturated gamut (a triangle larger than perfect matched xy ) with the proper lightness values is better than having a perfect match of the xy coordinates and wrong lightness values and lightness errors are more tolerated than hue errors.

Larry
post #3180 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by willieconway View Post

I thought something was off with skin tones after my calibration here. Specifically, it looked to me as if they had a hint of green. So I decided to redo it, this time with contrast at 70, but I'm having a few problems. The point where the 10 point shifts, e.g. between 6 and 7, is very hard to get right because I end up with one interval that no control can impact much. A couple of questions for the more seasoned folks here:
  • When doing the white balance (2 point), does it matter if I do the gains or the offsets first?
  • I'm on my third 64D7000 panel (one developed flashing pixels, the next had pink banding). On all three panels I ended up with the color control at 51 after using the blue only mode. Shouldn't that vary from panel to panel? I'm just curious since 49-50 is the most common setting on the D series.

Your charts don't show any exaggerated greens.

It is best to use the high end controls (gains for the Samsungs) before the low end (offsets.) The gains impact much more of the grayscale than the offsets.

Yes, panels and electronics have fairly large manufacturing tolerances so variations should be expected. The Samsungs seem to have a significantly greater variation in sets from the same model series than Panasonics. Since you have a meter, don't second guess it
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