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Samsung D7000 & D8000 Settings/Calibration Thread - Page 108

post #3211 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by chunon View Post

Color and tint affect saturation and hue respectively, so they impact primary and secondary colors all at the same time. Everything I have read indicates no need to touch them with a full CMS.

Yeah, I understand that. I guess it is similar to setting the picture temp to "Warm2" before messing with the grayscale 10 pt. Using the Color and Tint gets you a little bit closer before you start digging into the CMS. It's quick and easy, anyway.
post #3212 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob67 View Post

Yeah, I understand that. I guess it is similar to setting the picture temp to "Warm2" before messing with the grayscale 10 pt. Using the Color and Tint gets you a little bit closer before you start digging into the CMS. It's quick and easy, anyway.

Obviously you got a good result:), What you say makes sense. I don't have a Samsung but respect Tom's opinions. He is a very knowledgeable guy in fact he runs Chormapure.
post #3213 of 3298
Could be some peculiarity with the D7000's CMS system, as it's been noted that a slight tint adjustment can be very helpful - for example, see Larry's recent comment:
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI View Post

On the D7000 if the tint control is not used it is just about impossible to get magenta lined up properly.

Larry
post #3214 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by AvidHiker View Post

Could be some peculiarity with the D7000's CMS system, as it's been noted that a slight tint adjustment can be very helpful - for example, see Larry's recent comment:

Yes, I read that and would be interested to see any additional info because Magenta was a little finicky for me, as well.
post #3215 of 3298
Any settings that can fix the pnd8000 oversaturated skin tones? I've tried lots of settings and skin tones appear too smoothe like everyone's has a little to much make up on.
post #3216 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by locdog33 View Post

Any settings that can fix the pnd8000 oversaturated skin tones? I've tried lots of settings and skin tones appear too smoothe like everyone's has a little to much make up on.

You can try the fleshtone control setting lower it in the minus direction. I haven't noticed anything with oversaturated skin tone once i calibrated my tv and cms.. Have you calibrated your tv and cms? Did you use a meter or no meter?
post #3217 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by hungro View Post

You can try the fleshtone control setting lower it in the minus direction. I haven't noticed anything with oversaturated skin tone once i calibrated my tv and cms.. Have you calibrated your tv and cms? Did you use a meter or no meter?

No meter just used lots of different settings online but skin tones still look unnatural.
post #3218 of 3298
Does D-nice have any settings for pnd8000?
post #3219 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by locdog33 View Post

Does D-nice have any settings for pnd8000?

As far as I know D-nice doesn't post any settings for Samsungs just Panasonic.

Copying settings is not an accurate way of calibrating the set. You need a meter. Just cause you are using someone else's settings doesn't mean it will look correct on your set. I know that on my d6500 my fleshtones looked redish pink the entire picture had this pinkish tint too it. The greyscale was way too red in movie mode . Once i calibrated the greyscale and the cms flesh tones looked a lot more natural the tinting was gone.

Best thing to do is get a calibration disk and just set up your basic user menu settings , contrast , brightness, sharpness etc. Reset the movie picture mode to defaults turn off any picture procession stuff. Live with the results it's the closest to accurate you are going to get without a meter.
post #3220 of 3298
O
Quote:
Originally Posted by hungro View Post

As far as I know D-nice doesn't post any settings for Samsungs just Panasonic.

Copying settings is not an accurate way of calibrating the set. You need a meter. Just cause you are using someone else's settings doesn't mean it will look correct on your set. I know that on my d6500 my fleshtones looked redish pink the entire picture had this pinkish tint too it. The greyscale was way too red in movie mode . Once i calibrated the greyscale and the cms flesh tones looked a lot more natural the tinting was gone.

Best thing to do is get a calibration disk and just set up your basic user menu settings , contrast , brightness, sharpness etc. Reset the movie picture mode to defaults turn off any picture procession stuff. Live with the results it's the closest to accurate you are going to get without a meter.[/quote

Ok I do have the WOW disc so I guess il give that a shot. I'm coming from the kuro and also have 55vt50 if I can get the flesh tones close to those displays il be fine.
post #3221 of 3298
You could just spring to have it professionally calibrated if you don't want to buy a meter and do it yourself.
post #3222 of 3298
Finally got it looking good lol. Had to go into service menu and turn down sub brightness and sub contrast in white balance. Skins tones aren't all smooth and oversaturated anymore.
post #3223 of 3298
Not much action in this thread anymore but I hope some of the usual suspects are still looking.

I calibrated my 64D7000 again after reading that I shouldn't touch green gain when doing the 2 point white balance. So, after doing the basics and reaching my desired light output as well as target gamma (2.2) at 60%, I tried to avoid touching green gain in the white balance. I moved it up one click though. I also attempted to stay away from the green control when doing the 10 point but was a little less successful. Settings and charts below.

A couple of questions:
  • I have the Tutorial version of CalMAN 5 which only gives me an average gamma number in addition to a reading at 60%. What are the chances that I'll have a reasonable gamma curve since I'm essentially blind at most points?
  • Final color temp came out at 6420. Should I be fine with this or try to get closer to 6504? I'm guessing the difference isn't visible anyway but not sure.

The picture looks great to me but I've never seen a properly calibrated display so it could easily be off without my knowing.

Thanks!

Fl: 34.7
Avg. gamma: 2.2

Cell: 20
Contrast: 82
Brightness: 57
Sharpness: 0
Color: 51
Tint: 51/49

Gamma: +1

CinemaSmooth: On

White balance
R-o: 24
G-o: 26
B-o: 25
R-g: 9
G-g: 26
B-g: 15

10 point
1: -1, -1, 0
2: 1, 0, 1
3: 1, 1, 1
4: 3, 3, 4
5: -2, 0, 2
6: -1, 1, 3
7: -2, 0, 2
8: 0, 0, 0
9: 0, 0, 0
10: 0, 0, 0

Color space settings not included as I'm fairly comfortable with those.


post #3224 of 3298
Has anyone upgraded to the recent firmware for the PNXXD8000 that was released by samsung on March 16, 2013? Its version 1031.1
post #3225 of 3298
Hi, Willie.

Looks great. All values are consistent with the latest issue of the 64D7000 panel. The indicators are the required low values of the calibrated red and blue gains. (Yes, the panel configuration seemed to have been changed three times during the model's manufacturing life.)

WRT your questions: I'm not familiar with your version of CalMan and I'm surprised that you can't make it show a gamma curve. But if you can post your resulting calibrated Y measurements for all stimulus inputs and I'll plug them into HCFR to produce the gamma curve and post it for you. The following hows the Y values for a perfect 2.2 gamma for your max output and a typical D7000 minimum luminance.
Code:
stim %       cd/m^2          ftL
0        0.027          0.008
10       0.777          0.227
20       3.473          1.014
30       8.436          2.462
40      15.862          4.630
50      25.898          7.559
60      38.665          11.286
70      54.264          15.839
80      72.785          21.245
90      94.306          27.527
100    118.9            34.7


If I understand you, the color temperature of 6420 K that you mention is either an average or a value taken at one point. Either way, it is not important since your max delta E value is about 1.5. Again, if you want a color temp curve, give me your x, y, and Y values for all stimulus points and I'll plug them into HCFR for you



Larry
Edited by LarryInRI - 3/20/13 at 3:17pm
post #3226 of 3298
Thank you, Larry.

I have a limited (i.e. cheap) version of CalMan, Tutorial, that is missing some functionality. I'm considering upgrading but at the same time I don't know if I'll benefit much from the additional features.

The Tutorial version allows for a color temp reading at 80% and a gamma reading at 60%. Beyond that I just get an average when doing the 10 point.

The Y reading step in the software expects a 100% window. However, I'm trying to think if anything prevents me from just doing that reading at the other stimulus points too. I'll try this weekend.
post #3227 of 3298
Following up on my previous post: Y readings for all stimulus points are within +/- 0.2 from the values provided by Larry. Based on what I've seen this difference could easily be due to meter positioning (peak varies a bit depending on location). So that means gamma is indeed very close to 2.2. Thanks for providing the numbers, Larry.
Edited by willieconway - 3/24/13 at 9:33pm
post #3228 of 3298
I am going to attempt to diy calibrate my 59D8000 tomorrow using the AVS HD 709 Bluray, any tips or tuts for using that disc on this specific set? What should be my starting point? I have been using the settings in the OP for over a year, should I start the calibration with those settings? I used to use the DVE bluray in the past but that was years ago on my old HDTV's when 1080P was new, so I am not a complete newbie at callibrating but those sets were pretty basic in comparasion, so I definatly could use some tips, I tried a search & could not find a tutrial that used AVS HD 709 on my specific TV
post #3229 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by DViper2399 View Post

I am going to attempt to diy calibrate my 59D8000 tomorrow using the AVS HD 709 Bluray, any tips or tuts for using that disc on this specific set? What should be my starting point? I have been using the settings in the OP for over a year, should I start the calibration with those settings? I used to use the DVE bluray in the past but that was years ago on my old HDTV's when 1080P was new, so I am not a complete newbie at callibrating but those sets were pretty basic in comparasion, so I definatly could use some tips, I tried a search & could not find a tutrial that used AVS HD 709 on my specific TV

If you are just adjusting the set and not really calibrating, there is a pdf file in post #1 of the AVS HD 709 thread: http://www.avsforum.com/t/948496/avs-hd-709-blu-ray-mp4-calibration

If you are using that disk to calibrate with a meter, try this procedure. It is in this included somewhere in this thread. I can't find the link it so I'll repost it.

HCFR & Dx000 & i1 calibration 08112011.zip 314k .zip file

Larry
post #3230 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by DViper2399 View Post

I am going to attempt to diy calibrate my 59D8000 tomorrow using the AVS HD 709 Bluray, any tips or tuts for using that disc on this specific set? What should be my starting point? I have been using the settings in the OP for over a year, should I start the calibration with those settings? I used to use the DVE bluray in the past but that was years ago on my old HDTV's when 1080P was new, so I am not a complete newbie at callibrating but those sets were pretty basic in comparasion, so I definatly could use some tips, I tried a search & could not find a tutrial that used AVS HD 709 on my specific TV

Do you have a meter? If not, it's very straight-forward: follow the AVS HD 709 instructions for setting brightness, contrast, color and tint (using the blue only mode), and leave cell at 20. That's it. Leave white balance on the default values, color space on auto, and 10 point off.

Edit; sorry, missed your starting point question: start from Movie mode with all 'enhancements' turned off.
post #3231 of 3298
Excellent tips, & no I am not using a meter, so I dont adjust color space or white balance? Wont that result in a bad calibration?
post #3232 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by DViper2399 View Post

Excellent tips, & no I am not using a meter, so I dont adjust color space or white balance? Wont that result in a bad calibration?

Unless you know the standards a calibration targets and your eyes can spot deviations from it, touching them could easily result in a bad 'calibration'. Without a meter you're as likely to make things worse as you are to make things better. But I believe white balance and color gamut on your D8000 aren't bad of out the box. Maybe some owners will correct me though.

I've gone the fairly usual route:
1. Watching with out of the box settings.
2. Copying other people's complete settings.
3. Doing the basics with a disc (I also used AVS HD 709).
4. Buying an entry level meter and learning (slowly...) how to actually calibrate.

#4 is very much still a work in progress. However, I can easily identify the two steps that have made the biggest improvement in terms of picture quality for me: doing the basics with a disc, and, later on, setting greyscale/white balance with a meter. On my D7000 the out of the box settings weren't horrible, but copying other people's settings, while fun, was a complete lottery. And I definitely cannot adjust white balance by eye although I'm guessing some people, perhaps if they're more experienced, might be able to.
post #3233 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by DViper2399 View Post

Excellent tips, & no I am not using a meter, so I dont adjust color space or white balance? Wont that result in a bad calibration?

Here are a few general tips for using the disk.

First reset all the copied settings to the default Movie mode including the white balance and 10 point values. Now set Gamma to 0 (for the D7000 to +1), Color Space to Auto, Color Tone to Warm2 and turn off all the gimmicks (black tone, dynamic contrast, edge enhancement, etc.)

Set Cell to 20 and, while in your normal viewing environment, adjust Contrast to where you can watch comfortably without eye strain. Don't set Contrast higher than 92 or 93 -- it causes the bright whites to become pinkish.

Now using the black level adjustment screen on the disk, set Brightness so that the number 16 bar is black and 17 is barely flashing. Do this while you are close to the screen and at eye level with it. After doing this, from your viewing seat the number 18 bar should be barely flashing.

You can use the blue "RGB Only Mode" to help adjust the Tint and Color settings but the defaults on the D series are quite good.


After doing all this, if you see a red, green, or blue tint to the whites or darkish grays especially while watching a black and white move, the white balance controls can be used to get rid of them. Of course, without a meter it's not really calibrating but it can produce a more pleasing personally preferred picture. Let me know if you need more info about this.


Larry
post #3234 of 3298
Did it today based on Larry's advice just to compare the 3 main settings you said to use bright,con,color aren't all that different from the main op settings I was using, not yet sure if I see a difference yet but its proably placebo that I expect it to be worse since having color space & 10p White on auto.
post #3235 of 3298
My D8000s blacks are getting blotchy-er as the set ages. Are there any simples steps I could take for deeper blacks without going through a formal calibration?
post #3236 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by DViper2399 View Post

Did it today based on Larry's advice just to compare the 3 main settings you said to use bright,con,color aren't all that different from the main op settings I was using, not yet sure if I see a difference yet but its proably placebo that I expect it to be worse since having color space & 10p White on auto.

If you can't see any difference, you should leave the color space to auto, white balance values all at 25, and 10 point off. I have had three panels on my 64D7000 -- the D8000 and D7000 use the same panels. The three all vary wildly and require significantly different settings after proper calibrations.with equipment. (They are all posted in this thread.) Other D series models that I calibrated were all different also.

The only adjustment that can be done visually to get rid of red, green, or blue coloration in a pure white screen is with the white balance controls. And as I said before, this is not the same as calibrating but can get you to a personally pleasing picture.

Larry
post #3237 of 3298
Just finished my 1st ever Calibration on my UK PS51D8000 with the Colormunki Display and the difference really is night and day, looks fantastic now biggrin.gif








I'll post my Settings up if anyone is interested

Cheers, Steve
post #3238 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by buttonsw View Post

Just finished my 1st ever Calibration on my UK PS51D8000 with the Colormunki Display and the difference really is night and day, looks fantastic now biggrin.gif

I'll post my Settings up if anyone is interested

Cheers, Steve

nice looking calibration, congratulations.
post #3239 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoyd View Post

nice looking calibration, congratulations.

I'll second that statement. Very nice indeed.

Larry
post #3240 of 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryInRI View Post

I'll second that statement. Very nice indeed.

Larry

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoyd View Post

nice looking calibration, congratulations.


Thanks Larry and Zoyd, I still can't believe the difference it has made! I always thought the TV's color and Gamma were pretty good being a top of the range Samsung Plasma but it was way, way off eek.gif

Picture looks fantastic now smile.gif
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