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Ripping Blu-Rays II - Page 92

post #2731 of 5693
My strategy has been to rip every music Blu-ray because I will listen/view these countless times (ripped as full ISOs for HD audio and for the bonus materials). For movie Blu-rays, I just don't buy many these days, not near the number that I used to with DVDs. The number of movie Blu-rays that I rip is even smaller yet. For example, Lawrence of Arabia is one of my favorites, yet I've watched the Blu-ray twice, and it will be a long time before I watch it a third time. Does it make the cut for ripping? Yes it did, but the number of Blu-rays that I deem worthy of ripping is very limited, mainly classics like the Godfather Trilogy, Apocalypse Now, Bridge on the River Kwai, etc. that I know I will re-watch several times. It just seems a waste of my time and storage capacity to rip movies that I don't intend to watch at least 3 or 4 times, which eliminates almost every movie made in the last 20 years or so.
Edited by scolumbo - 5/9/13 at 8:06pm
post #2732 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nethawk View Post

Something's missing from this logic. If you aren't likely to ever re-watch a movie, why buy the disk in the first place? rolleyes.gif
In many ways it is like collecting books. My wife and I have hundreds of novels on the bookshelves downstairs. 99% of them have been read only once.
post #2733 of 5693
...
Edited by PobjoySpecial - 5/16/13 at 2:33pm
post #2734 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by scolumbo View Post

My strategy has been to rip every music Blu-ray because I will listen/view these countless times (ripped as full ISOs for HD audio and for the bonus materials). For movie Blu-rays, I just don't buy many these days, not near the number that I used to with DVDs. The number of movie Blu-rays that I rip is even smaller yet. For example, Lawrence of Arabia is one of my favorites, yet I've watched the Blu-ray twice, and it will be a long time before I watch it a third time. Does it make the cut for ripping? Yes it did, but the number of Blu-rays that I deem worthy of ripping is very limited, mainly classics like the Godfather Trilogy, Apocalypse Now, Bridge on the River Kwai, etc. that I know I will re-watch several times. It just seems a waste of my time and storage capacity to rip movies that I don't intend to watch at least 3 or 4 times, which eliminates almost every movie made in the last 20 years or so.

I do the same. My buying habits have changed significantly in the last 10 years. If it's not reference quality (The Fall, Life of Pi), a kick-ass adventure (Iron Man, Sherlock Holmes, Bourne series) or a classic/epic it isn't worth a purchase. Honestly I think the whole ripping thing is a bit silly, my player works perfectly with no tweaking or adjusting, all remote control commands work, I can even access menus and subtitles eek.gif The DVDs will all be stored on a HDD and given away to some charity for resale, the BD archived just because I can, and it helps me keep my geek on. I do periodically go back and watch old movies (saw A Bug's Life just last night), and I gotta say it's really cool to see a few hundred movies in Media Browser. What I own will be ripped, what I buy from now on will have to pass the "will I want to rip this" litmus test.
post #2735 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by mastermaybe View Post

As a guy just getting into this game, I tend to agree with this inclination.

I already find myself using a lot of discretion as to what I'm ripping. As I said in another thread, I won't be caught digitally hoarding movies like I did with music. If you're not going to watch it, where's the value? One hour and 30 some gigs to have Fantastic Four around? Ummmm, prolly not, lol. Thankfully 95% of my buys have been much more disciplined.

And that's good because I DO watch many movies time and time again. 30 TBs worth? No way. I figure 10-12 TBs should set me up for LONG while.

But, like so many aspects of AV, I realize it's a numbers game for some. Whatever helps you sleep at night I guess.

James

Hey!! Fantastic Four is one of the BD titles I have watched, at least part of it, multiple times redface.gif . With me I never know what I will be in the mood to watch. So I like having a nice selection around to choose from. At 5Pm I could be in the mood to watch a certain movie, and at 8PM when I sit down to watch I might be in the mood for something completely different.

Although lately for me, most of my BD purchases have been 3D titles. I have been watching a bunch of 3D. I guess to make up for the five years I had a 3D LED DLP and never bought the adapter to be able to view 3D. So I upgraded to a newer DLP at the beginning of the year since RP DLPs weren't being made any more and have been thoroughly enjoying watching alot of 3D titles.
Edited by aaronwt - 5/9/13 at 9:34pm
post #2736 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post

In many ways it is like collecting books. My wife and I have hundreds of novels on the bookshelves downstairs. 99% of them have been read only once.

I consider myself a collector also, it started with a coin collection and matchbox cars as a kid (which I still have tucked away in a closet).

I have a media room that has floor-to-ceiling bookshelves full of books, and more CDs, SACDs, DVD-As, DVD-Vs, and Blu-rays than I will ever have time to enjoy multiple times. I also have a bookshelf full of LPs that are gathering dust, however, I did give up my VHS, 8-Track tapes and cassettes.

Maybe it's laziness, but I decided that I would rip all my music, but for movies only those that were "rip-worthy", sort of like Elaine deciding if a date was sponge-worthy. Mostly classics and epics, or reference-quality Blu-rays as previously mentioned.

I do wonder if the next generation will be collectors, or just rely on the cloud, for everything digital.
post #2737 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nethawk View Post

Something's missing from this logic. If you aren't likely to ever re-watch a movie, why buy the disk in the first place? rolleyes.gif

I hope you're not speaking of MY logic, because that's precisely my point. I have made a share of "blind buys" but that ended a long time ago.


James
post #2738 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepar View Post

PRECISELY! As a guy just getting into this game, I wouldn't be getting into this game if I felt like some of the members who posted just above. The posts are more like testimonials for streaming.

Jeff


Ummmm, no. You need to understand and make a distinction here, and it has nothing to do with playing a movie back via disc or a hard drive. It has to do with retaining media you rarely if ever in many cases, re-consume. The playback methodology is immaterial, we just happen to be talking about ripping which ups the ante by consuming time and HDD space.

Choosing to rip and and have access to content that I WILL (and do) watch has nothing to do with axing content that I don't. My first 50 rips were all movies and concerts I've watched at least a half-dozen times over the last year or so...and that was when they were in my changer that, while convenient, demanded a bit more "ok, we're going to do this" than my media player which is already paying dividends in the "ultimate playability/access" department.

To me if it has real value to you, it's worth having access to. If it doesn't trim the fat, lol.

James
Edited by mastermaybe - 5/10/13 at 5:37am
post #2739 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by PobjoySpecial View Post

Companies love a collector.
Quote:
Originally Posted by scolumbo View Post

I consider myself a collector also, it started with a coin collection and matchbox cars as a kid (which I still have tucked away in a closet).
Everybody collects something, whether it be coins, art, books, stamps, video disks, music disks, shot glasses, pot holders, chop sticks, matchbooks . . . collecting is very personal.

The fortunate are the ones who admit they collect a particular item for the joy collecting gives them and are happy every time they look at and add to their collection(s). Some cannot bear the thought of ever discarding something they have taken the time to collect. Others take pride in pruning their collections to a manageable size of the items they hold most significant. The opposing sides often cannot understand the others choices.
Edited by Kelson - 5/10/13 at 6:04am
post #2740 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by scolumbo View Post

I consider myself a collector also, it started with a coin collection and matchbox cars as a kid (which I still have tucked away in a closet).

I have a media room that has floor-to-ceiling bookshelves full of books, and more CDs, SACDs, DVD-As, DVD-Vs, and Blu-rays than I will ever have time to enjoy multiple times. I also have a bookshelf full of LPs that are gathering dust, however, I did give up my VHS, 8-Track tapes and cassettes.

Maybe it's laziness, but I decided that I would rip all my music, but for movies only those that were "rip-worthy", sort of like Elaine deciding if a date was sponge-worthy. Mostly classics and epics, or reference-quality Blu-rays as previously mentioned.

I do wonder if the next generation will be collectors, or just rely on the cloud, for everything digital.

Me too (re the collector angle). I want to be (at least somewhat, lol) proud of my collection and for it to have some meaning, not simply a compilation of everything and anything I got my digital hands on. And I'm not saying any of the aforementioned does or deosn't apply to anyone else here, just stating my angle.

When I look at my 118 gig itunes library there is clearly filler in there that I will NEVER listen to. Can people with 40, 50, 60 terabytes of video not say the same? I'm not a TV show guy, so I suppose that can skew collections a bit northward, but still, what's 50 TB's? A couple thousand full-length, uncompressed films? Any kind of compression could yield a total closer to 10,000.

Seems to start reeking of specmanship to me at some point.

Have a great weekend.

James
post #2741 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post


Everybody collects something, whether it be coins, art, books, stamps, video disks, music disks, shot glasses, pot holders, chop sticks, matchbooks . . . collecting is very personal.

The fortunate are the ones who admit they collect a particular item for the joy collecting gives them and are happy every time they look at and add to their collection(s). Some cannot bear the thought of ever discarding something they have taken the time to collect. Others take pride in pruning their collections to a manageable size of the items they hold most significant. The opposing sides often cannot understand the others choices.

Very true. If it makes you happy and doesn't hurt anyone, it's all good. It's impossible to rationalize everything.


James
post #2742 of 5693
If I'm going to be completely honest, after a couple of red box rentals something occurred to me that helped me understand why SOME may have these gargantuan collections:

It's just too easy.

Oh, and storage is cheap. I just bought a 4 TB HDD for $139 and it boggles my mind a bit just how much goddamn data I can put on the thing.

What's a 20-60 minute rip and a fraction of that 4TB's? Less than a $1 a film to have it on hand for "x" number of years, if not forever. It very much reminds me of being 20ish when the digital music/itunes/napster world began. Within a year, half of my friends had (seemingly, anyway) half the music on earth, lmao.

James
post #2743 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post


Everybody collects something

Since I started archiving less I guess I'm collecting time and money. wink.gif
post #2744 of 5693
^ If you're happier, I'm (genuinely) happy for you. But if everything made everyone equally appeased the world would be a pretty boring place smile.gif

James
post #2745 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post

The fortunate are the ones who admit they collect a particular item for the joy collecting gives them and are happy every time they look at and add to their collection(s). Some cannot bear the thought of ever discarding something they have taken the time to collect. Others take pride in pruning their collections to a manageable size of the items they hold most significant. The opposing sides often cannot understand the others choices.

The hard part is coming to the realization that you really don't have time to consume all the media that is collected, although the older I get, the more it hits me.
post #2746 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by scolumbo View Post

The hard part is coming to the realization that you really don't have time to consume all the media that is collected, although the older I get, the more it hits me.

Exactly. It looks cool...and simultaneously daft to me, lol. I try to play part of it up to being able to have a good selection for guests/family members, but there's only so many who will sit down and watch Uncle Buck, Stripes and 100 other similarly solid, but dated, titles with me. tongue.gif

James
post #2747 of 5693
Thread Starter 
Usually people collect something that you can't easily obtain on Amazon Prime or netflix. So collecting movies isn't quite the same as collecting stamps.

When many of us started streaming you had two choices. (A) buy the movie or (B) rent the movie. Option B usually entailed driving some distance to a local Blockbuster type store, searching for the movie which may or may not be there, then paying $3+ to rent it for a day. Then you had to return it. Then came Netflix but even than was $20 per month and you couldn't really stream anything in HD video or audio. Then came On Demand services, but they are still expensive ($5 per movie? really?). But streaming has jumped by leaps and bounds just over the past five years. And now RedBox offers a BD of the latest movies for $1.50 and has locations on nearly every street corner. You can rent the movie online and know it will be there when you arrive.

I find that I buy fewer and fewer movies each year (Disney movies being the big exception). When I can stream virtually any movie in HD video and sound, I'll likely stop keeping my own media server.

IMHO, music is slightly different. When I'm running I don't want my music interrupted because I lost a cell signal. And I tend to use my music where I would not necessarily have the ability to stream or streaming would simply place too much strain on my battery in too little time. I have some of that with movies too, when I travel (can't stream on a plane).
post #2748 of 5693
And this is why I compress my stuff. If done right you get 50-80% compression with such negligible quality loss that I doubt most anyone could tell the difference from source. Unless of course you are pausing to look for differences, but I don't watch movies frame by frame so that shouldn't matter.

Compression was my answer years ago to people, but most would just say storage is cheap so why compress? Well the problem is it is only cheap until you run out of raid ports and have to buy another $1k raid card.
post #2749 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by DotJun View Post

And this is why I compress my stuff. If done right you get 50-80% compression with such negligible quality loss that I doubt most anyone could tell the difference from source. Unless of course you are pausing to look for differences, but I don't watch movies frame by frame so that shouldn't matter.

Compression was my answer years ago to people, but most would just say storage is cheap so why compress? Well the problem is it is only cheap until you run out of raid ports and have to buy another $1k raid card.

Who is buying a $1k raid card? I have had no issues with $150 cards (Supermicro and Highpoint)
post #2750 of 5693
And I've had no problem with my $40 port multiplier raid cards. They work great in my main unRAID with five external enclosures housing twenty drives.
post #2751 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbone1026 View Post

Who is buying a $1k raid card? I have had no issues with $150 cards (Supermicro and Highpoint)

Same people who spend $1k on a raid card are the ones buying 7200 & 10,000 RPM drives for BD streaming when a simple 5200 green drive can handle multiple BD streams.
post #2752 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killroy View Post

Same people who spend $1k on a raid card are the ones buying 7200 & 10,000 RPM drives for BD streaming when a simple 5200 green drive can handle multiple BD streams.

My drives of choice these days are the WD 3TB Red drives (I think 5400RPM) and Seagate 4TB drives (I think 5900RPM)
post #2753 of 5693
...
Edited by PobjoySpecial - 5/16/13 at 2:33pm
post #2754 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killroy View Post

Same people who spend $1k on a raid card are the ones buying 7200 & 10,000 RPM drives for BD streaming when a simple 5200 green drive can handle multiple BD streams.
Seagate Barracuda 3TB 7200rpm drives at $120 are just about the cheapest 3 TB drives out there -- I just bought another one today. I can't see spending more money for a lower speed 5200 rpm drive just because it has "green" on the sticker. Granted, I use my Media-PC for a lot more than just serving video files to my streamers.
post #2755 of 5693
...
Edited by PobjoySpecial - 5/16/13 at 2:36pm
post #2756 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by PobjoySpecial View Post

I think the ST4000DM000 is probably the best value today and almost certainly will be for the next 6 months.
That drive will have to drop under $160 before you can say that. I haven't seen that drive under $180, yet. A $120 ST3000DM at $40/TB is the best deal today.
post #2757 of 5693
Newegg had them for $160 3 weeks ago, I grabbed two of them.
post #2758 of 5693
I nailed my seagate 4TB for $139 at Costco.

$35 per TB is fine by me!

James
post #2759 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killroy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbone1026 View Post

Who is buying a $1k raid card? I have had no issues with $150 cards (Supermicro and Highpoint)

Same people who spend $1k on a raid card are the ones buying 7200 & 10,000 RPM drives for BD streaming when a simple 5200 green drive can handle multiple BD streams.

Well granted I did get my 3ware 9650-24's when they first came out so they were a bit on the expensive side.

I use mine for more than storing movies so hardware with bbu was a must. With such large arrays it became important to do raid 6 instead of 5, which is also the reason for going hardware.

I've tried port multipliers but every one I've tried has slowed down my write performance. Which are you guys using with success, maybe I'll try it again?
post #2760 of 5693
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbone1026 View Post

Who is buying a $1k raid card? I have had no issues with $150 cards (Supermicro and Highpoint)

Still using my Adaptec 52245, excellent compatibility, performance and reliability despite being rather old now.
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