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The Plains Theater - Page 17

post #481 of 1535
Thread Starter 
And here's an update just for Mr. Hitachi smile.gif My fan came in yesterday as well. I ordered it off of Amazon on Sunday night and it showed up Wednesday morning. This is despite a warning that the seller required an additional 3-5 days for order processing.

At any rate, the thing is big! Notice the landing on my stairs is four steps up (about 30"). The actual fan dimensions are 22" x 11" x 15". I'd read that before, but hadn't stopped to really think about it.

Fan007.jpg

Fan008.jpg

I wired it up to an extension cord (don't try this at home kids) because I wanted to know what I'd be dealing with. My first impression is the FAN is really quiet! It's certainly quieter than most of the other exhaust fans in my house. The fan inlet is also very quiet. However, there is quite a bit of wind noise at the fan exit. If you look down the exit you can see that the 8" duct is pretty much cut in half by the fan shroud. So there's lots of wind noise there.

The moral of the story is I think it will be very quiet in the theater, but I will need to get creative on the fan exit to have enough duct length to cut the noise down where it dumps into my basement. So if you can, leave yourself some space on the fan exhaust for some extra duct.
post #482 of 1535
Wow, just kinda went thru this entire thread, very nice. I'll attempt to stop by and keep up, as it was an enjoyable read.

My take on securing wires/cables etc (after decades of being around such things); In my experience, it all depends on if you're going to have access. If you have access to the area, bundle away however you wish. But if you don't have access, I would not secure them tightly. Any number of things could happen, and it's always beneficial to have the capability to utilize one cable as a pull wire for another pull. Again, that's my take,...YMMV.

Anyway, my 2 cents, and after a good read to this point, it's the least I could do.


Best of luck
post #483 of 1535
Thread Starter 
FOH, glad to have you along for the ride, and I hope the rest of the thread will be enjoyable as well. I must admit that I'm only just now getting to the part that I've been looking forward too smile.gif

Thanks for the tips on the wiring. I'll have to go stand and stare at it again. I don't know that I'd be able to pull any of those wires back if I tried. They all go up to the second floor, and it's a pretty tortuous route eek.gif But I sure would hate to eliminate my only path up there by mistake!
post #484 of 1535
Yeah, looking at those pics, I don't know what I was looking at. My advice was just big picture-overview type stuff. Please don't let it bother you, merely keep it in mind.

Your pics are great and your lot, place, wow, just the ideal combo of elements. Congrats on getting in, ....... what an exciting time I'm sure.

I'm going to peruse back thru the thread, I'm interested in the audio/acoustics aspects of the HT, so going to re-read a bit.


Again,
Good luck
post #485 of 1535
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

The moral of the story is I think it will be very quiet in the theater, but I will need to get creative on the fan exit to have enough duct length to cut the noise down where it dumps into my basement. So if you can, leave yourself some space on the fan exhaust for some extra duct.

....a little white noise outside from the exhaust side might be a good thing, it could help cover up any sound leakage from your theater into other rooms cool.gif
post #486 of 1535
Over on the Black Cat theater thread thread we had some challenges with a 6 inch version of that fan. Even with the fan connected to the theater with 15 ft of TRUE acoustical duct the transition of the 6 inch duct into Linacoustic lined box which opened into the theater was too noisy due to the velocity of the air and other pipe to box transitional noise effects. We ended up transitioning the 6 to an 8 inch duct and dumping into a refrigerator sized serpentine box on the supply side. And a coffin sized box on the return.
post #487 of 1535
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

As an fyi, anytime you go from larger ducts to smaller ducts you increase the air velocity, so splitting an 8 into two sixes will increase the velocity and face pressure. Moving from an 8 to a 10, for example, will decrease the velocity and face pressure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

I didn't stop to run the numbers on the two 6" ducts vs the single 8" as I assumed the total cross-sectional area would be higher. It is, but not nearly as much as I would have expected! Two 6" ducts has a total CSA of ~57 in^2 and an single 8" is ~50 in^2. Seems like there would be some velocity reduction there, but nothing like what I would want. I'm glad you brought that point up. looks like I'll be running two 8" ducts up to my soffit and building a soffit duct at the rear of the theater at the very least.

Hey JPA - I was just catching up on your thread and saw a couple of my own comments that jumped out at me as unclear so I thought I would set the record straight.

First, regarding the above interaction. Typically speaking a single 8 inch pipe handles 200 CFM and a six inch pipe handles 100 CFM, so it stands to reason that with the loss at the split and other air resistance that each of the two 6 inch pipes would rate slightly less than 100 CFM. In a professional design it would be more typical to split the 8" duct with a piece referred to in the industry as a "T on Taper" with the 6" pipe coming off the T and a 5" pipe (yes, five) coming off the tapered end. So in the example it would be called an 8-5-6 T on Taper. This will maintain the same CFM in both pipes, despite the pressure drop from the 6" coming off the 8" pipe first. That is for the CFM. Now, as far as the FPM (feet per minute) face velocity, this depends exclusively on your input CFM to be calculated properly. Normally, an HVAC guy will target 400 to 450 FPM face velocity....but this is home theater where the upper end target is somewhere around 250 FPM according to the Illuminati of this forum and other industry professionals. I ONLY use linear slot diffusers for the supply registers. Nailor has a handy calculator based on duct size, CFM input, etc. where you can precisely calculate the expected face velocity. However, given 100 CFM as the max throughput for a 6" rigid pipe, most applications will call for a 24" 2 slot diffuser. This will yield acoustic performance under NC-20 (Noise Coefficient less than 20db) which is the maximum acoustic noise threshold with the mechanicals running fully on. The return side is far less complex and simply involves some sort of muffler or dead vent system for the intake to sequester or suppress the light draw of the return ducting system. As I said before, 8" return is sufficient for two 6" (or one 6" and one 5") supplies, but I like to go up to a 10" due to the increased frictional resistance of the dead vent to maintain equivalent draw. If you really wish to dial it in, a damper can be used inside the 10" return pipe to slightly close off any return flow and put the entire HVAC for that room in near perfect supply / return balance. I don't know what I was thinking when I wrote the above, but it was careless and I wanted to correct my misstatement.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

The other thing I will mention is that since your supply lines are connected to the main system with the thermostat upstairs, have you considered how you will avoid heating the theater if the upstairs floors are calling for heat? I realize in Alabama the overwhelming majority of the time you will be cooling, but there are probably several months where you will also be heating I would guess. Perhaps a ducted split system is in your future.....
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

The basement is on a separate zone. Of course, I don't know what will happen if one zone is calling for heat, and another is calling for cooling. Fortunately, the way our basement is laid out, We could actually put in another dedicated unit without much trouble........... aside from the cost anyway........... and figuring out where to put the exterior unit...... rolleyes.gif

Second, regarding this interaction. Dennis is right, zoning systems are well-defined and relatively easy to set up through establishing zone priorities. But what I was getting at was I did not see any accommodation in your plans to add motorized dampers to truly zone out the supply lines to the theater when they are providing heat to the rest of the house. I was essentially throwing a little thought-provoking challenge to your HVAC design about throwing in some "normally open" dampers because you are cooling most of the time, but have the system close them completely whenever any other zones call for heat so the theater does not get the heat. The ducted split system naturally sidesteps all of these issues and provides you with a dedicated system for your theater where you have independent control of heating and cooling for the room and all the noisy bits are located away from the room near an outside wall. Certainly the easiest and most effective, but also the more costly option.

So please forgive my brain fart on these two points above....I promise I'll do better in the future!! wink.gif

Now, let me harass you a second about clipping those ends off the cable ties....LOL!
post #488 of 1535
Awesome post!
post #489 of 1535
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOH View Post

Yeah, looking at those pics, I don't know what I was looking at. My advice was just big picture-overview type stuff. Please don't let it bother you, merely keep it in mind.
Your pics are great and your lot, place, wow, just the ideal combo of elements. Congrats on getting in, ....... what an exciting time I'm sure.
I'm going to peruse back thru the thread, I'm interested in the audio/acoustics aspects of the HT, so going to re-read a bit.
Again,
Good luck

We're really pleased with the way the house turned out. So far, we wouldn't change anything. We've been working towards this house for a long time, and feel really fortunate to be in it. Thanks for the compliment!

I probably need to update my first post with my extremely limited audio plan. Dennis is doing my acoustic design, but I haven't decided on Quest panels or purely absorption yet. We'll have to see what the cost is. As far as equipment goes, I'll do as much DIY as I can. I'm thinking something like Lil Mike's F20 unless the DTS-10 is available as a kit again for sub duty. I'll shoot for 2 subs to begin with, but I could easily get 3 in the room. Possibly a fourth, but it would be in an odd location, so I'm not sure about the benefit. For the other speakers, I've only done a little research, but maybe something like 4 pi's or I may look into the SEOS project a little more. But in any case, it'll have to be something DIY. I'm planning to spend most of my money on the room, and then get equipment as I can.

If you've got advice on this part, I would greatly appreciate it! I like building stuff, but I'm in way over my head when it comes to audio gear!
post #490 of 1535
Thread Starter 
BIG and TMcG,

You guys have a been a huge help with my ventilation setup. I originally considered the 8" into two 6" ducts as a result of Morph1c's problems with his ventilation. My goal is to slow down the air. TMcG pointed out (and clarified quite well in his previous post) that two 6" ducts are still undersized. My current plan is to run an 8" flex from the fan under my riser all the way to the back wall, and transition to a 10" before it turns up the wall. Even with a 10" duct, it looks like the velocity is too high for 400 cfm, but I'm guessing I won't get that much flow with a 25'-30' run of flex. I'm also planning to build a large plenum at the ceiling that's connected to my soffit where the vents will be. I haven't looked at the volume yet, but if I don't have enough space in my soffit, I may use part of the back wall to create a large vent.

That odd section at the back of my theater was an annoyance to begin with, but I'm quickly finding more and more uses for it smile.gif

The fan exhaust will be a bit more trouble as I'm space limited at that end.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

...........

If you really wish to dial it in, a damper can be used inside the 10" return pipe to slightly close off any return flow and put the entire HVAC for that room in near perfect supply / return balance........

TMcG, you've mentioned this before, and I want to make sure I'm not overlooking something that could be disastrous. My plan is to have a powered exhaust that will draw more air out than my HVAC supply is providing with the difference coming from an unpowered crossover duct connected to an adjacent room. The idea being it will squeeze a few more CFM out of the 8" HVAC supply as well as pull some extra cool air from the adjacent room in order to meet the recommended number of air exchanges. Is this a bad idea?
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

.......But what I was getting at was I did not see any accommodation in your plans to add motorized dampers to truly zone out the supply lines to the theater when they are providing heat to the rest of the house. I was essentially throwing a little thought-provoking challenge to your HVAC design about throwing in some "normally open" dampers because you are cooling most of the time, but have the system close them completely whenever any other zones call for heat so the theater does not get the heat.......

I didn't think much about this at the time, but I've since found that the dampers in my house are set to bleed air in order to keep velocities down and help reduce humidity, and, and, and, and (I was given a very long list of reasons this is a good thing). The down side, as you point out, is in the winter, the theater will also get some heat whenever another zone calls for it. We may be looking into some adjustments there. I'm also still not sure why I couldn't another zone damper just for my theater, but our HVAC guy said we couldn't. If we have problems, I may have to revisit that issue.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

..................Now, let me harass you a second about clipping those ends off the cable ties....LOL!

My friend, we may have reached a philosophical impasse! I've cut myself far too many times on the little sharp points left after cutting off the ends of cable ties. I leave them on there whenever possible. biggrin.gif

I've been told that someone makes a handy little tool for cutting them off flush, but I don't have one..... I may need to ask Santa if he can find me one!
post #491 of 1535
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 235 View Post

....a little white noise outside from the exhaust side might be a good thing, it could help cover up any sound leakage from your theater into other rooms cool.gif

I can already see how this might be useful.

"I'm sorry, Honey. I couldn't hear you ask me to turn it down over the noise from the exhaust fan" biggrin.gif
post #492 of 1535
Can you add a variable speed controller to the fan? That could allow you to tweak the return flow while making things a bit quieter. I'm guessing you won't need 400CFM the majority of the time if you only have a couple people in the room.
Will your fan be accessible for maintenance?
post #493 of 1535
A variable speed controller for ceiling fans will work. At Lowes for ~$20 Run at 1/2 speed
post #494 of 1535
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post

A variable speed controller for ceiling fans will work. At Lowes for ~$20 Run at 1/2 speed

This sounds like a good option, maybe run at slow setting all the time and thermostatically get actuated to full power? 

post #495 of 1535
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 235 View Post

...........Will your fan be accessible for maintenance?

My fan will be accessible. I'm planning to put it in an unused area under the stairs as well as part of an adjacent closet. I hadn't planned on needing the closet, but after hearing the it run, I think I'll need the extra real estate.
post #496 of 1535
Thread Starter 
You guys have me thinking. My original plan was to just build the return so that it's quiet enough that I didn't have to worry about changing the speed. However, now that I think about it, I wonder if it would be possible to get a speed controller and wire the fan to turn on at low whenever the PJ and/or AVR are turned on, but also pickup the AC demand signal from my HVAC thermostat, and use that to signal the fan to turn on to high speed when AC is called for. That way, the fan is at least on low whenever the room is in use, but turns on at full tilt when the AC is on.

I don't think noise in the theater is going to be an issue in either case. So I'm really just looking at options for keeping the noise down in the adjacent basement space.
post #497 of 1535
Wow - a lot of posts since last night.... a few thoughts regarding the full conversation above since my last post:
  • My CFM statistics were based on rigid duct. Even when insulated, rigid is not ideal for home theaters for soundproofing reasons. However, given your limited amount of airflow you have to preserve the function of the system first and foremost, followed by the soundproofing. As flex lines offer much higher air friction resistance, a good rule of thumb is to upsize the flex 2 inches vs. the rigid. For example, if you have 6" rigid, you should use 8" flex. If you use 8" rigid, you should use 10" flex, etc. to preserve the same air handling capacity.
  • Regarding adding a 10" damper to the return air duct to balance the system....You don't want to overpressure a room with too much supply or too little return. Likewise you don't want to oversupply and under-return. You need everything to be in very close balance to work properly. If you had relatively sparse supply and a very strong return, the system will create its own "micro climate" between the supplies and the return because the negative pressure caused by the return will not allow for all the conditioned supply to mix with the room air before it is returned. Think of this as no different than water. If you had an aquarium with two tubes supplying red-tinted water and an oversized pump pulling water from the tank at a higher rate than it is being replenished.....I think it would be easy to imagine how a current would form in the aquarium where most of the "new" red dyed water would be headed straight for the pump intake and there would be diminished mixing of the red dyed water with the other water in the tank. Sometimes it is easier to visualize thermal transfer when you put it in these terms and use these example scenarios. So the lesson to learn here is - everything in perfect balance. That being said, the variable control will work to help put the system in balance, but where it gets complicated with these in-line systems NOT tied to the HVAC is how they know when to come on and off....and even further how do they know what to do when supply dampers to the theater may be closed as not to allow heat to be supplied when it is called for upstairs. Similarly, the HVAC system may not be running at all and causing the same negative pressure situation. By running the theater's supply AND return off the main HVAC system, a damper is used to balance the amount of return with the amount of supply and, when motorized, both supply and return can be programmed to close when heating is called for on the first floor or any other zone. I realize you are limited in your options and your system design by the limitation of your new HVAC system. There are ways to add zone controllers to existing equipment that can be independently set up and programmed, but it begins to cost more money to modify and make an existing system work than it is to cut bait and purchase a ducted split system so 100% of the theater conditioning is on its own dedicated zone. Hopefully this point is clear.
  • I don't recall what posts, but I do remember when your house was being constructed discussing getting the right "brains" in your HVAC system so the basement could be zoned separately. If you don't have the correct control board that will allow for separate zones PLUS the pressure balance ducting and everything else needed, then your HVAC tech is right - it is difficult if not near impossible to add at this point. Although expensive, another alternative would be to purchase a two-zone dedicated system specifically for the basement. This would give you the ultimate in comfort and flexibility for your basement and your theater.
  • HVAC runs on 24v signals, all AV trigger equipment runs on 12v or less. So triggering power to the in-line fan from the AV equipment is very easy. Triggering the in-line fan from any HVAC feedback is doable, but not as straightforward. Integrating the two in an either/or scenario with some sort of logic behind it is difficult and something I have personally never seen or heard of. I don't mean to shoot down your idea, but I would caution you against using the power of the Panasonic in-line far for just the PJ hush box and AVR. It is simply too powerful for those small areas. And while it will certainly pull out the heat, the greatly accelerated amount of air pulling from these areas will have your equipment filled with dust in no time. The only way to use this fan would be to carefully balance the size/length/type of the duct and the amount of CFM through this duct via damper. Of course this still doesn't solve the negative pressure issue created if ONLY the in-line fan is running and you are not receiving any supply into a highly sealed room.

I know your head may be ready to explode from the information above, but you begin to see why I am not a fan (pun intended) of one fan handling all chores....and having that fan be off the HVAC system actually supplying the room. To me, the way to go is a ducted split system dedicated for the theater, but outside of this option here is some practical advice and clarity to how I would proceed with making your existing equipment "work" as best as possible.
  • Allow your projector to breathe in free space at its mounted position in the room. If you MUST (or really want) to put the projector in an appropriately sized hush box, purchase a Cool Cube from Active Thermal Management to ventilate the heat from your projector hush box to outside the room. http://www.activethermal.com/page33.html The Cool Cube can either be triggered to come on when your projector comes on, or it also has a built-in thermostatic control with variable speed fan which works extremely well to keep things at 85 degrees and less.
  • For your AV closet, buy either the Active Thermal Management System 1 with the in-line fan: http://www.activethermal.com/system%201.html OR buy a 80CFM Panasonic Quiet fan and a Honeywell 120v digital thermostatic control. I personally like the Panasonic / Honeywell combination because it is significantly cheaper and works extremely well. Panasonic Fan: http://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-FV-08VQ5-WhisperCeiling-Ceiling-Mounted/dp/B003TJAGPS
  • If you need more supply to your home theater, use in-line duct booster fans to draw more CFM into the theater supply lines. Install normally open dampers in the supply lines since most of your air conditioning will be cooling. Install a normally open motorized damper in the return air duct. Purchase a controller that will interface with your existing HVAC system and CLOSE the two supply and one return dampers if your primary HVAC system calls for heat. Purchase a variable fan control and match the total CFM of return with your Panasonic in-line fan to the total CFM of supply coming in to the room. Talk with your HVAC tech on ways to integrate this now-variable speed fan to come on ONLY when the dampers are open and ONLY when the HVAC system is running. Don't forget the controller will also need to turn off the in-line duct booster fans in the supply lines if the dampers close.

That ducted split system is looking better by the minute, right? biggrin.gif Good luck!
post #498 of 1535
Wow great writeup TMcG.

One option for inline fan control is a smart thermostat. I use the HAI thermostats that connect to my PC where I run home automation software. Another lower tech option might be a pressure sensing switch:

http://www.combustiondepot.com/store/cart.php?m=product_list&c=124
post #499 of 1535

Hey J_P_A,

 

After playing with the fan do you think its too many cfm for just a projector hush box and equipment rack or would you step back to like the 240cfm?

 

Thanks,

 

Nicholas

post #500 of 1535
Thread Starter 
I think you'll have some noise issues if you're just venting a PJ and equipment rack. That said, if you need to pull some air from your room as well, it would give you the flexibility to do that.

Keep in mind, it's not the fan that's loud. The fan is actually surprisingly quiet. Again, it's quieter than all but one of the vent fans in my house. It's the wind noise that would be a problem. If you try to move that volume of air through a small line, it's going to be loud. And by small, anything less than 8" would be considered small for this fan. If I remember your setup correctly, you would need two 8" lines at a minimum I think, and even that might be an issue if it doesn't open into a plenum or a large lined box. You might even need to transition from an 8" to a 10" before connecting to your hush box. I suppose you could use a damper to limit the air to the PJ. Then you could use a smaller line there without the noise.

It really just depends on how much air you need to keep the equipment room well ventilated. I can't imagine that you would need as much air as this fan moves, though.
post #501 of 1535
Still finalizing designs?
post #502 of 1535
Thread Starter 
Yep. Still waiting on my layout from Dennis. However, Dennis posted in the "Alabama Build" thread that RoseAnne has passed away unexpectedly, so I think they have more important things to deal with at the moment. I feel pretty crummy about the whole thing because I sent RoseAnne an email yesterday asking about an expected delivery date. I was wondering why my emails had been ignored over the past few weeks; then I find out why this morning. Talk about wanting to climb under a rock!
post #503 of 1535
I'm still shocked at her passing.
post #504 of 1535
Thread Starter 
I never met her in person, but she always seemed like an extremely nice lady. And lord knows she had to be patient to talk to me as long as she would about theater designs!
post #505 of 1535
Thread Starter 
Well, it's a while since I've posted an update. There hasn't been much happening, but hopefully that will change pretty soon. I've got my layout back from Dennis, and I'm very pleased with it. I've placed my order with Ted and John at The Soundproofing Company, and I'm expecting my supplies next week. I'm also planning to make a trip to HVAC supplier next week to pick up some odds and ends that I need for my HVAC work.

Along those lines, I've got one more HVAC question (for now). Is there any reason I can't run my crossover vent and my HVAC supply to the same side of the room? If you look back at this post, you can see that the way I've modeled it, one of the two lines will only be above the theater for a 1' to 2'. The other will go all the way across the room. I'm wondering if I can just run them both all the way across the room. The only immediate drawback that I see is the two vents will be next to each other. Both will be supplying air, but one will be powered from the HVAC and the other will work solely on negative pressure generated by the exhaust duct pulling from the back of the room.
post #506 of 1535
Your models look great, but I have a hard time understanding what your issues are and the proposals to work around. Couldn't you just put a dedicated AHU in one of the rooms next to your theater? That seems a lot simpler than trying to tap into the existing system and run lines all over the place. That way it would be self contained and you wouldn't necessarily have to use the same HVAC contractor as your house or risk impact to your main system. You could look into getting a low noise dedicated unit and run a metal soffit around the room to maxamize your cross sectional area. Maybe bring the soffit further out into the room, in exchange for shallow hegiht? Have you asked the HVAC guys that did your house what they think would be best?
post #507 of 1535
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

Well, it's a while since I've posted an update. There hasn't been much happening, but hopefully that will change pretty soon. I've got my layout back from Dennis, and I'm very pleased with it. I've placed my order with Ted and John at The Soundproofing Company, and I'm expecting my supplies next week. I'm also planning to make a trip to HVAC supplier next week to pick up some odds and ends that I need for my HVAC work.

Along those lines, I've got one more HVAC question (for now). Is there any reason I can't run my crossover vent and my HVAC supply to the same side of the room? If you look back at this post, you can see that the way I've modeled it, one of the two lines will only be above the theater for a 1' to 2'. The other will go all the way across the room. I'm wondering if I can just run them both all the way across the room. The only immediate drawback that I see is the two vents will be next to each other. Both will be supplying air, but one will be powered from the HVAC and the other will work solely on negative pressure generated by the exhaust duct pulling from the back of the room.

Hi JPA,

Id be concerned that if they were close to each other the flow would "short circuit" and just loop back onto itself and not mix with the room. Especially due to the high velocity......

Nicholas
post #508 of 1535
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabident View Post

Your models look great, but I have a hard time understanding what your issues are and the proposals to work around. Couldn't you just put a dedicated AHU in one of the rooms next to your theater? That seems a lot simpler than trying to tap into the existing system and run lines all over the place. That way it would be self contained and you wouldn't necessarily have to use the same HVAC contractor as your house or risk impact to your main system. You could look into getting a low noise dedicated unit and run a metal soffit around the room to maxamize your cross sectional area. Maybe bring the soffit further out into the room, in exchange for shallow hegiht? Have you asked the HVAC guys that did your house what they think would be best?

I forget that everyone is not as intimately familiar with my build as I am smile.gif

The supply that I have should be more than enough to keep the room cool. I spent a lot of time talking with the HVAC contractor about it, and he sized the supply more than adequately (I've got the load calc he used as well). At this point, I'm only trying to add another vent to bring in "fresh" air from adjacent rooms just to keep the theater air from getting stale. That whole 6 exchanges per hour business. I suspect I'm over thinking the problem, and should just put the single 8" supply in that my HVAC contractor designed, but what fun would that be, right ? smile.gif

Also, I'd like to stay away from a dedicated unit if I can. I don't really have a convenient place for the compressor outside. Getting the ductwork into the room would likely use the same route as I'm planning, anyway, due to the layout of my engineered flooring system. With that said, that is my fallback plan. If I can't get this to work, then we'll be going that route for sure. Once I get the room in drywall, I plan to put several lights in there and measure the temperature over the course of a few hours, a la "The Black Cat Theater" and make sure I don't have any problems before I go any further.
post #509 of 1535
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NicksHitachi View Post

Hi JPA,
Id be concerned that if they were close to each other the flow would "short circuit" and just loop back onto itself and not mix with the room. Especially due to the high velocity......
Nicholas

That's what I was afraid of as well. Even though both are "supplies," I'm wondering if I would get adequate mixing in the room.
post #510 of 1535

Oops, yeah i see now, thought they were supply and return side by side.  Ignore me.  :)

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