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2011 Mitsubishi 3D DLP Owners Thread (740/840 series) - Page 120

post #3571 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murdock03 View Post

I apologize if this has been answered already, but I saw a previous post with the same question (not from me) many, many, many pages back that never got answered.
Is the speaker bar in the 840 sufficient enough for a center channel when using the center channel setting? I just ordered a 92840 and am debating if I spend the extra money I saved on a center channel or surround speakers (currently have 2 AR Hi-Res tower speakers, and Velodyne sub running on a Denon AVR)

General concensus, from what I understand, is that all of the speakers in a surround sound system (5.1, 7.1) preferably should be of the same series of the same manufacturer. That way the acoustic characteristics (chamber enclosures, voice coils, cones, frequency response, crossovers, power capacity, impedence, etc) will be properly matched for optimum reproduction of content from each speaker's responsibility (front L/R, center, side L/R in 7.1, rear L/R). Using the sound bar speakers in the 840 as a center channel would theoretically be a compromise, but "usable" nonetheless if a matched system isn't possible. The center channel is a very important part of the system, as it reproduces the dialogue portion, and if not "in tune", would result in muffled, unintelligible voices. It has a different frequency response curve than the other speakers in the system.
post #3572 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murdock03 View Post

I apologize if this has been answered already, but I saw a previous post with the same question (not from me) many, many, many pages back that never got answered.
Is the speaker bar in the 840 sufficient enough for a center channel when using the center channel setting? I just ordered a 92840 and am debating if I spend the extra money I saved on a center channel or surround speakers (currently have 2 AR Hi-Res tower speakers, and Velodyne sub running on a Denon AVR)

Quote:
Originally Posted by K7JQ View Post

General concensus, from what I understand, is that all of the speakers in a surround sound system (5.1, 7.1) preferably should be of the same series of the same manufacturer. That way the acoustic characteristics (chamber enclosures, voice coils, cones, frequency response, crossovers, power capacity, impedence, etc) will be properly matched for optimum reproduction of content from each speaker's responsibility (front L/R, center, side L/R in 7.1, rear L/R). Using the sound bar speakers in the 840 as a center channel would theoretically be a compromise, but "usable" nonetheless if a matched system isn't possible. The center channel is a very important part of the system, as it reproduces the dialogue portion, and if not "in tune", would result in muffled, unintelligible voices. It has a different frequency response curve than the other speakers in the system.

With all of that said and being absolutely true, the speaker array that comes with the Diamond sets are pretty good alone for TV speakers. Therefore "in a pinch" I would suspect that they can suffice for a center channel until one can save for a true surround sound setup.
post #3573 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murdock03 View Post

I apologize if this has been answered already, but I saw a previous post with the same question (not from me) many, many, many pages back that never got answered.
Is the speaker bar in the 840 sufficient enough for a center channel when using the center channel setting? I just ordered a 92840 and am debating if I spend the extra money I saved on a center channel or surround speakers (currently have 2 AR Hi-Res tower speakers, and Velodyne sub running on a Denon AVR)

I would say, give an try and see how it goes, you might like it or not depend upon it you can decide it whether you want to buy it or not. I use Martin Logan speaker sets for my 9.2 with center channel speaker. I personally didn't use mine TV 92840 speaker as center channel because i knew it will not give me good vocal as my ML speaker. just my 2 cents wink.gif
post #3574 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murdock03 View Post

I apologize if this has been answered already, but I saw a previous post with the same question (not from me) many, many, many pages back that never got answered.

Is the speaker bar in the 840 sufficient enough for a center channel when using the center channel setting? I just ordered a 92840 and am debating if I spend the extra money I saved on a center channel or surround speakers (currently have 2 AR Hi-Res tower speakers, and Velodyne sub running on a Denon AVR)

Only you can decide. You'll get different answers depending on who you ask. My friend has an 840, and while the TV speakers are more than adequate for him as the only speakers he uses, I would always recommend a matched set for the front three speakers in a suroound setup. However, since you already ordered the TV I would try it out for awhile with the TV speakers as center channel. You can always buy the matching center later if it proves to be the way to go. Please post your thoughts here when you decide.
post #3575 of 3948
Thanks for the responses. One thing that ultimately made my decision (in the short term at least) was an inability to accurately determine how much space I would have for the center channel. I have a new TV stand to accompany the new Mits and with the limited space (~ 5" head room) I figured I could try the center channel on the Mits for the time being and if its inadequate, then purchase a separate one. Actually I decided to spend the extra money I saved on a new Denon AVR to replace my 789 model and also added a pair of Boston Acoustic surround speakers. To me, I could forgo the money for the center for the time being in order to get an upgraded receiver so I didn't have to run a ton of cables (to get 3D capability with my old AVR I would have had to run an HDMI to Mits, optical to receiver as well as analog to receiver for whole house system).

But, never the less the answers were extremely helpful! Now......what 3D glasses to I purchase?? The X104's?
post #3576 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murdock03 View Post

Thanks for the responses. One thing that ultimately made my decision (in the short term at least) was an inability to accurately determine how much space I would have for the center channel. I have a new TV stand to accompany the new Mits and with the limited space (~ 5" head room) I figured I could try the center channel on the Mits for the time being and if its inadequate, then purchase a separate one. Actually I decided to spend the extra money I saved on a new Denon AVR to replace my 789 model and also added a pair of Boston Acoustic surround speakers. To me, I could forgo the money for the center for the time being in order to get an upgraded receiver so I didn't have to run a ton of cables (to get 3D capability with my old AVR I would have had to run an HDMI to Mits, optical to receiver as well as analog to receiver for whole house system).
But, never the less the answers were extremely helpful! Now......what 3D glasses to I purchase?? The X104's?

The Mitsubishi recommended 3D glasses is the Xpand 3DG-X103. I have 2 pairs for my 73740, and they work fine with the built-in IR emitter.
post #3577 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murdock03 View Post

Thanks for the responses. One thing that ultimately made my decision (in the short term at least) was an inability to accurately determine how much space I would have for the center channel. I have a new TV stand to accompany the new Mits and with the limited space (~ 5" head room) I figured I could try the center channel on the Mits for the time being and if its inadequate, then purchase a separate one. Actually I decided to spend the extra money I saved on a new Denon AVR to replace my 789 model and also added a pair of Boston Acoustic surround speakers. To me, I could forgo the money for the center for the time being in order to get an upgraded receiver so I didn't have to run a ton of cables (to get 3D capability with my old AVR I would have had to run an HDMI to Mits, optical to receiver as well as analog to receiver for whole house system).
But, never the less the answers were extremely helpful! Now......what 3D glasses to I purchase?? The X104's?

Quote:
Originally Posted by K7JQ View Post

The Mitsubishi recommended 3D glasses is the Xpand 3DG-X103. I have 2 pairs for my 73740, and they work fine with the built-in IR emitter.

X104: I have not used the X104 but many folks here said that its hard to stay synced.
3Active: I use them and really liked it and i dont see any color shifting
TrueDepth: Has some color shifting issue 3D
Xpand 103 is one of the best but it bit heavier and uncomfortable wearing it for long time. I have used it at PaulsTV when i was in market to by WD-92840. Also need to replace battery on it which is painful because its hard to open it, even rep at PaulsTV was not able to open it and i gave up b/c it might get broke and picture looks little darker with it.
Monster Vision Max 3D: is good but haven't tried it but planing to purchase it in future.

You can decided what you want and also search the forum on this thread as their are many reviews and many times this question has be answered.
post #3578 of 3948
Best Buy has the PS3 branded glasses on clearance for $29.99. You might be able to find them at Kmart clearance for $20.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/SONY+COMPUTER+ENTNMT+AMERICA+-+3D+GLASSES/2904117.p?id=1218459141544&skuId=2904117&ky=2oh0NrwOl4j1qjMx3Oy2gXfVGhMUl0WiJ&utm_campaign=bazaarvoice&utm_medium=SearchVoice&utm_source=RatingsAndReviews&utm_content=Default

I have 2 pairs of those and they work fine with my 73640 & 3DTV Corp generic emitter.
post #3579 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by lujan View Post

My Darbee Darblet will be in tomorrow and I was wondering what others of the 82740 (or other models) have found to be the best setting for the Darbee? Just looking for a good place to start since I've never used this device?

I'm thinking I'm going to have to return my Darblet because the 82740 keeps thinking it's found a new device and wants me to name it so I just select the top item "Device" and then it resets all my Video settings and the 3D no longer works because the "Device" name I selected doesn't apparently allow for 3D. Anyone else have this problem with their Darblet? Am I selecting the wrong name for the device? Should I select "DVD" for example?
post #3580 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by lujan View Post

I'm thinking I'm going to have to return my Darblet because the 82740 keeps thinking it's found a new device and wants me to name it so I just select the top item "Device" and then it resets all my Video settings and the 3D no longer works because the "Device" name I selected doesn't apparently allow for 3D. Anyone else have this problem with their Darblet? Am I selecting the wrong name for the device? Should I select "DVD" for example?

I don't see that problem on my setup. AFAIK, it will ask you to name it again only if you switching HDMI input in your TV. I have connected it to AVR since day 1 of my darblet and it newer ask me to give new name, it ask me to give new name when i use another HDMI port on my 92840, which will definitely not gonna carry over settings from one HDMI to another, you will need to redo your settings. AFAIK, this settings will be saved based on HDMI input connected, so each input can have different settings which i like it.
post #3581 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalsaria View Post

I don't see that problem on my setup. AFAIK, it will ask you to name it again only if you switching HDMI input in your TV. I have connected it to AVR since day 1 of my darblet and it newer ask me to give new name, it ask me to give new name when i use another HDMI port on my 92840, which will definitely not gonna carry over settings from one HDMI to another, you will need to redo your settings. AFAIK, this settings will be saved based on HDMI input connected, so each input can have different settings which i like it.

No, I haven't changed the HDMI input on the back of the 82740 so I don't know what's going on with it?
post #3582 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by lujan View Post

No, I haven't changed the HDMI input on the back of the 82740 so I don't know what's going on with it?

what is the firmware and software version on your Darblet?
have you tried changing HDMI cable?
how long is your HDMI cable?
post #3583 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalsaria View Post

what is the firmware and software version on your Darblet?
have you tried changing HDMI cable?
how long is your HDMI cable?

I have no idea but just got the Darblet. It only started happening when I got the Darblet. The HDMI cable is 6 feet long.
post #3584 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by lujan View Post

I have no idea but just got the Darblet. It only started happening when I got the Darblet. The HDMI cable is 6 feet long.

You might be having handshake issue with your source and Darblet and i believe because of it TV is asking you to rename it again. Have tried changing cable and changing input source? Also make sure you are using HDMI 1.4
post #3585 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murdock03 View Post

I apologize if this has been answered already, but I saw a previous post with the same question (not from me) many, many, many pages back that never got answered.
Is the speaker bar in the 840 sufficient enough for a center channel when using the center channel setting? I just ordered a 92840 and am debating if I spend the extra money I saved on a center channel or surround speakers (currently have 2 AR Hi-Res tower speakers, and Velodyne sub running on a Denon AVR)




Murdock, i truthfully have to say that our new 92840 has the best built-in sound of any TV we've owned.

With that said, i can't wait to get my 7.1 sound sys hooked up & playing my favorites movies on it! [even if simulated]

Also in AVS you can find this nice guide.
Hope it helps you & others...


""That being said, there are a few widely accepted rules for picking your speakers. WagBoss advises: “Generally, people say that the front three speakers should be the same brand and model line. All front speakers will have a matching center. Surrounds don't matter as much, unless you listen to SACDs or other multi-channel music. For subwoofers, it doesn't matter at all what brand.” Also be sure not to invest too heavily in areas that aren’t as essential, as steveklein suggests: “I think the fronts are significantly more important than the rears/surrounds. Several years ago, I spent about $500 a speaker on my fronts and about $150 a speaker on my surrounds and i've been very happy with the results...IMO, I think it is silly to spend the same amount of money on surrounds as your front soundstage.”""


http://www.avsforum.com/a/what-surround-sound-configuration-is-right-for-you

....
post #3586 of 3948
I have a WD-73740, and want to know how to adjust the "Film Mode" menu item....Auto or Off. To me, the manual doesn't explain it fully. I use 3 inputs....3D Blu-ray player (1080p), DirecTV DVR (HD in 1080i), and antenna OTA broadcasts (HD in 720p or 1080i). Thanks for an explanation and advice.
post #3587 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by GEP View Post

If explained, the majority of people still would ask "What?!?"
1. DeepField Imager darkens near blacks selectively to give a higher contrast feeling to the picture - some people call this Black Crush because it "crushes" the dark grays down to black. It may also boost the near brightest areas to the brightest for that scene. However it is seems to be slightly more than simply darkening the dark grays or brightening the brights. If you want pure contrasts and gray scale, then this alters that so it cannot be a pure gray scale.
If your TV offers this feature, it also offers a demo mode. Look at the demo mode and decide for yourself - it is your TV, not the purists here.
2. Film Mode is "2:3 Pull Down Compesation" and is for interlaced incoming signals 480i and 1080i. In order to save signal bandwidth, interlaced signals will divide a frame in to two fields, Field A and Field B, and send these separately. Field A is only the odd numbered horizontal lines of the picture. Field B is only the even numbered horizontal lines. A new field is delivered to the TV every 60th of a second, so because there are two fields for every single frame, there are 30 full frames per second. The TV is a progressive display, not an interlaced display. This means the TV needs to receive the two fields and then combine them into one progressive frame (the display of all of the lines at the same time). The TV and standard TV Broadcast signals are at 60Hz. This means the TV shows 60 frames per second. This also means the TV shows each of the original 30 frames twice to up convert this to 60 frames per second. Video created in a TV studio is 30 frames per second, and if interlaced, 60 fields per second so combine the two fields and then repeating each frame once is the easy part.
However standard film is created at 24 frames per second not 30 or 60 frames per second. This means at the source of the signal they need do a special pattern called 2:3 pull down (some reverse this and call it 3:2 pull down). That would be using repeats to change the frame rate. It works this way:
Frame one is sent and then repeated once, Frame two is sent and then repeated twice, Frame three is sent and repeated once, and Frame four is sent and repeated twice.
1-1-2-2-2-3-3-4-4-4-etc.
Now to send interlaced signals they select just the correct lines for each Field either "e" even lines or "o" odd lines.
1e-1o-2e-2o-2e-3o-3e-4o-4e-4o etc. The reason even is always followed by odd is because that is the way the old fashion CRTs scanned the face plate.
Both of these process are call the frame "cadence" In order to combine the correct Fields of even and odd lines the TV needs to skip several fields and also identify when a frame was lead by an odd instead of an even field. The process of indentifying this cadence and compensating for the combining of lines and the progressive display is call 2:3 pull down compensation or correction. This means that the correct fields were used to combine so you do not have (for example) the even lines from 2e (third repeat) combined with odd lines of 3o (first field).
The Auto setting tells the TV to look for and use the flags in "properly" created digital interlaced signal to identify the fact that there is 2:3 pull down and to compensate. If there are no flags the TV often can still identify these signals by analyzing other factors. However, there can be errors in identification. The OFF setting tells the TV to always use the combination technique it would use for signals originally made in TV studios (30 frames per second).
This feature should be used, and OFF selected only when you can see the TV has made an error. The error is usually something jagged edges or a combing effect on edges.
3. Edge Enhancement - there are several ways to make the edges of objects in the image look sharper. However, most TVs use a technique of looking at the brightness transition at that edge and then adjusting the brightness of the few pixels adjacent to the edge. For instance if the color on the left of the edge is a brightness level of 16 out of a possibility of 30 - low dark and high bright (these are made up numbers for illustration) and the edge itself is 12. The TV may boost a few of the bright pixels adjacent to the edge to brightness 20. This makes the edge at 12 look a little sharper but those few pixels that are artificially bright become a "halo". I know nothing about the Darbee unit so I cannot say how it enhances edges - it should be noted that any edge enhancement is artificial but that does not mean it is bad - no original signal is perfect in the first place.
4. Video Noise means "Video Noise Reduction". Video noise is visible in the picture as tiny dots, snow, grain, slight bug looking crawling etc. It is the unintended "crap" that is in the signal. Remember this is no such thing as a perfect signal. Usually because this noise is very random the TV can identify a lot of this "crap" and correct for it. One of the methods (and there a lot of methods) is to limit higher frequencies of the video signals, however since the fine detail is in the high frequencies, too much limiting of the high frequencies also softens the picture. Usually the best signals are from sources like Blu-ray where there is much less places for the crap to be introduced, so you might want OFF for that source. However, as with everything - there are good Blu-rays, excellent Blu-rays, and poor Blu-rays.
post #3588 of 3948
Gentlemen:

I didn't receive any responses on the 2012-series thread. so I am posting here in the hope of obtaining some help:

After completing an initial calibration on our new 82742, I find the picture has a subtle grainy texture on all sources (Blu-ray and DirecTV HD, both 1080p and 1080i). In all other aspects of performance the TV looks great. But the Mitsubishi lacks the creamy, smooth, liquid, crystal-clear picture of the Hitachi 65” RPTV it replaces.

The “sandy” grain structure of the Mitsubishi’s picture cannot be eliminated or even slightly altered by reducing the sharpness to zero or utilizing the onboard filter settings. The grain is seen as shimmering little "dots" when the screen is examined up close (from about 2 feet away). From a 13-foot distance, clear white skies look like fine sandpaper and close-ups of faces have a sand-like texture. It reminds me a bit of an LCD television's screen-door effect.

I keep wondering if the grain is a result of a noisy video amplifier (it appears to be luminance noise, not chroma noise, as it is visible on black & white sources, too). The TV has had about 25 hours of use since taking delivery on Wednesday--does the unit require more burn-in time? Or is this a normal picture for Mitsubishi and the DLP format in general?

Thank you!
post #3589 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex F. View Post

Gentlemen:
I didn't receive any responses on the 2012-series thread. so I am posting here in the hope of obtaining some help:
After completing an initial calibration on our new 82742, I find the picture has a subtle grainy texture on all sources (Blu-ray and DirecTV HD, both 1080p and 1080i). In all other aspects of performance the TV looks great. But the Mitsubishi lacks the creamy, smooth, liquid, crystal-clear picture of the Hitachi 65” RPTV it replaces.
The “sandy” grain structure of the Mitsubishi’s picture cannot be eliminated or even slightly altered by reducing the sharpness to zero or utilizing the onboard filter settings. The grain is seen as shimmering little "dots" when the screen is examined up close (from about 2 feet away). From a 13-foot distance, clear white skies look like fine sandpaper and close-ups of faces have a sand-like texture. It reminds me a bit of an LCD television's screen-door effect.
I keep wondering if the grain is a result of a noisy video amplifier (it appears to be luminance noise, not chroma noise, as it is visible on black & white sources, too). The TV has had about 25 hours of use since taking delivery on Wednesday--does the unit require more burn-in time? Or is this a normal picture for Mitsubishi and the DLP format in general?
Thank you!
I think it's just the screen. What you're describing sounds just like my 65C9. I thought maybe it was because of dust inside the TV but I think that's just how they are.
post #3590 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by redonly View Post


Thanks for the explanation of Film Mode (and other features). I'll leave it in Auto, unless imperfections appear.
post #3591 of 3948
Has anyone just plugged their SubWoofer into the out-put jack on the 840 series.??

In other words just using the 16 speaker TV along with the subWoofer ??

Just wondering
post #3592 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex F. View Post

Gentlemen:
I didn't receive any responses on the 2012-series thread. so I am posting here in the hope of obtaining some help:
After completing an initial calibration on our new 82742, I find the picture has a subtle grainy texture on all sources (Blu-ray and DirecTV HD, both 1080p and 1080i). In all other aspects of performance the TV looks great. But the Mitsubishi lacks the creamy, smooth, liquid, crystal-clear picture of the Hitachi 65” RPTV it replaces.
The “sandy” grain structure of the Mitsubishi’s picture cannot be eliminated or even slightly altered by reducing the sharpness to zero or utilizing the onboard filter settings. The grain is seen as shimmering little "dots" when the screen is examined up close (from about 2 feet away). From a 13-foot distance, clear white skies look like fine sandpaper and close-ups of faces have a sand-like texture. It reminds me a bit of an LCD television's screen-door effect.
I keep wondering if the grain is a result of a noisy video amplifier (it appears to be luminance noise, not chroma noise, as it is visible on black & white sources, too). The TV has had about 25 hours of use since taking delivery on Wednesday--does the unit require more burn-in time? Or is this a normal picture for Mitsubishi and the DLP format in general?
Thank you!

What you are most likely seeing is SSE (silk screen effect). This is typical of rear pojection and most pronounced as the contrast goes up. It has nothing to do with sharpness but is an artifact of the required fresnel screen.. I am not saying that your CRT did not create it. Hitachi may have used some approach in the fresnel screen that minimized its SSE.
post #3593 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex F. View Post

Thank you for the reply.
It is possible the screen is the cause. But I have owned and critically examined other high-performance rear-projection sets since 1994 and have never before seen this type of picture. It is not a steady-state effect as I would expect from a screen's structure--it shimmers. It looks like luminance noise.
I spoke to my dealer. He took a very close look at three Mitsubishis on his sales floor (73", 82", and 92"). He said he never noticed it before, but all three units have the noise I described.
I then reinstalled the Hitachi 65S500 RPTV after a week of using the Mitsubishi. The difference was a revelation. The Hitachi's picture is extremely clear and noise-free, almost like looking through a window. The Mitsubishi 82742, on the other hand, is like looking through a dirty window that is in front of a window screen (with shimmering added in).
The Mitsubishi is going back to the dealer for a refund. It will be picked up tomorrow.
I am very disappointed. We really liked the size of the 82" screen and other performance aspects of the Mitsubishi. But the noisy picture quickly made it unwatchable, particularly coming off the sensational picture of the Hitachi.

Are you sure it's not because of the difference in screen size? I ask because my 65738 looks clearer with less noise than my 82740 because of the size difference. It's always going to appear less clear when you're fitting the same resolution into more real estate. 1920X1080 looks much better on 65" than it would look on 82". Know what I mean?
post #3594 of 3948
gtgray:

Thank you for the reply.

It is possible the screen is the cause. But I have owned and critically examined other high-performance rear-projection sets since 1994 and have never before seen this type of picture. It is not a steady-state effect as I would expect from a screen's structure--it shimmers. It looks like luminance noise.

Contrast settings did not alter the noise (after calibration my preferred contrast setting was “46,” well below the factory default; brightness was at “33”).

I spoke to my dealer. He took a very close look at three Mitsubishis on his sales floor (73", 82", and 92"). He said he never noticed it before, but all three units have the noise I described.

I then reinstalled the Hitachi 65S500 RPTV after a week of using the Mitsubishi. The difference was a revelation. The Hitachi's picture is extremely clear and noise-free, almost like looking through a window. The Mitsubishi 82742, on the other hand, is like looking through a dirty window that is in front of a window screen (with shimmering added in).

The Mitsubishi is going back to the dealer for a refund. It will be picked up tomorrow.

I am very disappointed. We really liked the size of the 82" screen and other performance aspects of the Mitsubishi. But the noisy picture quickly made it unwatchable, particularly coming off the sensational picture of the Hitachi.


lujan:

Thank you as well.

I certainly did consider that possibility. But the Mitsubishi's noise is still very visible from the back of the room, about 17 feet away. The Hitachi's picture is clear from 2 feet away. Also, I have not seen anything close to the Mitsubishi's noise on 100" or so screens from high-performance front-projection systems I have considered purchasing.
post #3595 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Ram Fan View Post

Murdock, i truthfully have to say that our new 92840 has the best built-in sound of any TV we've owned.
With that said, i can't wait to get my 7.1 sound sys hooked up & playing my favorites movies on it! [even if simulated]
Also in AVS you can find this nice guide.
Hope it helps you & others...
""That being said, there are a few widely accepted rules for picking your speakers. WagBoss advises: “Generally, people say that the front three speakers should be the same brand and model line. All front speakers will have a matching center. Surrounds don't matter as much, unless you listen to SACDs or other multi-channel music. For subwoofers, it doesn't matter at all what brand.” Also be sure not to invest too heavily in areas that aren’t as essential, as steveklein suggests: “I think the fronts are significantly more important than the rears/surrounds. Several years ago, I spent about $500 a speaker on my fronts and about $150 a speaker on my surrounds and i've been very happy with the results...IMO, I think it is silly to spend the same amount of money on surrounds as your front soundstage.”""
http://www.avsforum.com/a/what-surround-sound-configuration-is-right-for-you
....

Thanks everyone for their input. Now that I actually have the TV in possession (and am truly impressed!), I have a follow up to this question as well as a couple of others:

- Has anyone actually used the center channel function on the 840 series? I ask because the information provided by Mits in the user manual for the center channel function is somewhat confusing. It is stated on page 16: "Your A/V receiver must have a center channel pre out that can supply an amplified center-channel signal to the TV".....but the only connection that is provided on the Mits is a is just a line level input from a 'center channel pre-out' based on the diagrams provided in the manual . So in the center channel function does the AVR power the speakers, or does the Mits internal amp power the speakers? If its supposed to be an amplified center-channel signal from the AVR, how is that possible with the inputs provided?

- does anyone have any calibrated settings for the 92"? I found some earlier on in this thread but I believe they were from a 72". Im assuming that the settings would be reasonably close, but probably not exact.

- I ended up getting the 3DGX103's for glasses. I haven't watched any 3D BD movies (because I don't have a player yet), but I have watched some movies through my cable providers on-demand service. It seems like I am seeing a lot of motion blur or stuttering, especially in scenes with a lot of movement. Some scenes are almost unwatchable, puts a lot of strain on the eyes. Function of the quality of the content or something else (a setting, glasses, etc)? I have done the firmware upgrade on the unit so I know its not that.
post #3596 of 3948
I'd say it's just the quality of the content and the huge screen making it more obvious. Too much compression.
post #3597 of 3948
Most likely it is a mis-print and intended to say a "pre-ampilified" output instead of "amplified". Internally in a AV Reciever there are two stages, the "pre-amp" that handing incomming line level signal switching, audio processing, volume control and surround sound decoding/processing (so it is not exactly a line level signal like you get from an analog output of a CD player) and the "amplifers" that power the speakers. The pre-amp outputs are between the two stages. The input on the TV is for the pre-amp output and the TV amp powers the internal speakers.

Yes lower resolutions 3D does not look as good as BD 3D but also make sure you have the most current software in your TV. To check press menu and the software level is shown in the lower left corner of the first menu displayed (it is also shown in the lower right hand corner of the menu and is also shown in the INPUT menu / UPDATE sub-menu.

According to the Mitsubishi web site, 13.06 is the most current software version. Someplace earlier in this thread I read that 3D performance improved with newer software.

http://www.mitsubishi-tv.com/support/documents/WD-92840
post #3598 of 3948
Squeaky:

When I evaluate video (and audio) components I always use the same reference discs. In the case of the WD-82742 (vs. the Hitachi) I used Blu-ray discs with the best transfer prints, comparing the same scenes within a given movie. If compression was the culprit it would have been obvious, too, on the 65" screen when viewed at a distance that yields the same magnification of the image as seen on the 82" screen (which I calculated in advance). The Hitachi, as I already stated, was still far better when viewed close up vs. the Mitsubishi far away.

The Hitachi, as of now, is simply a superior product. I hope Mitsubishi can improve their video performance to the point that I want to buy another 82" model in the future. If that happens, I'm there.
post #3599 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex F. View Post

Squeaky:
When I evaluate video (and audio) components I always use the same reference discs. In the case of the WD-82742 (vs. the Hitachi) I used Blu-ray discs with the best transfer prints, comparing the same scenes within a given movie. If compression was the culprit it would have been obvious, too, on the 65" screen when viewed at a distance that yields the same magnification of the image as seen on the 82" screen (which I calculated in advance). The Hitachi, as I already stated, was still far better when viewed close up vs. the Mitsubishi far away.
The Hitachi, as of now, is simply a superior product. I hope Mitsubishi can improve their video performance to the point that I want to buy another 82" model in the future. If that happens, I'm there.

Good thing I watch my 82740 from 12 - 13 feet away. smile.gif
post #3600 of 3948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex F. View Post

Squeaky:
When I evaluate video (and audio) components I always use the same reference discs. In the case of the WD-82742 (vs. the Hitachi) I used Blu-ray discs with the best transfer prints, comparing the same scenes within a given movie. If compression was the culprit it would have been obvious, too, on the 65" screen when viewed at a distance that yields the same magnification of the image as seen on the 82" screen (which I calculated in advance). The Hitachi, as I already stated, was still far better when viewed close up vs. the Mitsubishi far away.
The Hitachi, as of now, is simply a superior product. I hope Mitsubishi can improve their video performance to the point that I want to buy another 82" model in the future. If that happens, I'm there.
I was actually responding to Murdock03 about his issues with video quality with On Demand content. Sorry, I should have quoted him.
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