or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Another DownUnder theatre - Page 17

post #481 of 497
Peter - what did you use for holding the insulation in place? some sort of screw?

post #482 of 497
Thread Starter 
Peter,

I used insulation stick pins kinda like these ...



Cheers,
post #483 of 497
Thread Starter 
You can get them here ...

Stick pins

Cheers,
post #484 of 497
We normally just use long wood screws, with a washer. Bit of black tape to cover the head/washer. About 6 screws for a 1200 x 2400 sheet of material.
post #485 of 497
Stick pins.....75 cents each and I need 300 of the "pricks" biggrin.gif .......stupid DIY ducts are going to cost me a fortune.....should keep the bass out/in though

Worthwhile though, they'll save me some time, thanks Peter.
post #486 of 497
Wow! So much to think about with my new house and the theatre room. I think I might get the builders to leave it with the framing exposed and finish it my way. Cheers again with thread!!!
post #487 of 497
Hi Pete,

When the baffle wall and front screen wall were built, were the frames fixed to the floor, walls and ceiling, or isolated in some fashion? Or because you have an isolated room, it didn't matter because the new walls are isolated from the house anyway.

What size lumber did you use for the baffle and screen wall?

Cheers

Gary
post #488 of 497
Thread Starter 
Hi Gary,

Apologies for the delay ... I'm away on business.

My floor has a 1/2" acoustic underlay below the two layers of plywood and I was concerned about long term compression of this layer, so under the baffle wall I inserted a strip of plywood. I know this reduced the isolation, but I'm glad I did it. All up my baffle wall weighs about 2000 pounds !! The frame for the baffle wall was fixed to the floor and through the double drywall into the timber framing on the walls and steel channel on the ceiling.

The baffle wall frame is 6 x 2" and the screen wall frame is 4 x 2".

I may well have done things differently if my theatre wasn't totally isolated from the rest of the house. Unfortunately structural considerations sometimes trump acoustic isolation. I see quite a few threads in which guys express disappointment with the level of isolation they achieve, and I think this comes from a lack of experience. It's important to have realistic goals.

Cheers,
Peter
post #489 of 497
Hi Pete,

Thanks for the reply.

That's one hellava screen wall! Does it need to be that robust if the speakers are isolated from it, or did you just build it as strong and as rigid as you could? I guess you don't want any flex in the wall.

At one point I was thinking that I would need to keep the woven AT screen material as close to the speakers as possible, and that would mean a curved screen, but your build uses a flat screen and speakers aren't that close to it. Construction wise, it looks so much easier to build it in the same way you have to get some speaker toe in which does seem an important factor.


Gary
Edited by Gary Lightfoot - 1/19/14 at 6:41am
post #490 of 497
Thread Starter 
Gary,

My baffle wall construction is according to Dennis' design. I understand that the weight and rigidity is required in order to minimise vibration / movement and the resulting colouration of the sound.

The preferred AT screen / speaker distance is actually the reverse ... more separation is better, particularly for perf screens. As far as I know there is no downside to more separation.

Cheers,
Peter
post #491 of 497
Thanks again for the info Pete smile.gif

Gary
post #492 of 497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter M View Post

Baffle wall is sheeted, equipment room is partially sheeted, soffits are framed and nearly fully sheeted, ceiling baffle framing is started ...




Very happy with the progress !


Cheers,


What is that ceiling baffle framing made of?
post #493 of 497
Thread Starter 
It's galvanised steel. The bottom flange is painted black so it wouldn't show through the fabric.

Cheers,
post #494 of 497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter M View Post

Bass absorber baffle is finished, soffits finished, ceiling baffle insulated, downlight wiring done, speaker wire in, column framing underway, one speaker hole cut in baffle wall ...







Cheers,

hmm then framed around with wood, running 2X4 lenth-wise, stuffed with rockwool, wrapped in fabric, then the wood slats are on top of that? am i on the right track?

btw, thanks for all your assistance!
post #495 of 497
Thread Starter 
Basically, the fabric was temporarily taped to the underside of what you see above, and then the 2x1" timbers screwed to the gal steel framing.

Cheers,
Peter
post #496 of 497
Hi Peter. May I ask what fabric track profile you used to get that double-bevel look? Is this what you used? http://www.fabricmate.com/downloads/Site-Fab-Detail-19.pdf Thanks!
post #497 of 497
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

Hi Peter. May I ask what fabric track profile you used to get that double-bevel look? Is this what you used? http://www.fabricmate.com/downloads/Site-Fab-Detail-19.pdf Thanks!

No fabric track in my build at all !

The columns and walls are all individual panels. I used a ripped down bullnose skirting profile for the panel framing with mitre cuts at all the corners. It was probably more work than some of the other panel framing methods used here, but I'm really happy with the results.

Cheers,
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home