or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › 'Awake' on NBC HD
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

'Awake' on NBC HD - Page 3

post #61 of 270
Poor kid can't seem to get a *real* acting job these days eh (His characters may exist only in dreams....?)

post #62 of 270
Did anyone else notice the blue tint or red tint to the video depending on what "reality" he was in?
post #63 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

For one, I did not care for the cinematography. There were too many head shots. Are we supposed to count the pores on the actors skin for some kind of contest? Does NBC maintain some kind of book that showrunners are supposed to follow regarding cinematography? Why are they still catering to a dwindling population with old 4:3 sets?

I didn't notice your 4:3 comment, I'll have to pay more attention next week(yes I'll be back!) but definitely noticed the number of pores on the actors face Not only were their a large number of "head shots" but with NBCs extremely sharp 1080i(at least in my market) I felt like I should be turning down the sharpness of my HDTV. Although I prefer this type of cinematography to something muddy like Alcatraz(FOX) CBS seems to be the only one in my market who can manage to get things "just right" in regards to being sharp but not overly so.
In regards to the program itself, I found myself drawn into the dual realities storyline and I look forward to the coming weeks......of course I was also a fan of Prime Suspect AND the Firm and look where that got me At least the Firm is still on and with a DVR I don't really care what night, as long as it's still on.
In regards to the "tint", yes I noticed that nice touch, that and the color of his rubber wrist band(depending on the reality) which seemed to be a little over the top but a indication none the less.
post #64 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin B View Post

Did anyone else notice the blue tint or red tint to the video depending on what "reality" he was in?

Yes, its part of the cinematography and its red tint and green tint, just like the rubber bands Michael Britten wears.
post #65 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

For one, I did not care for the cinematography. There were too many head shots. Are we supposed to count the pores on the actors skin for some kind of contest? Does NBC maintain some kind of book that showrunners are supposed to follow regarding cinematography? Why are they still catering to a dwindling population with old 4:3 sets?

It was hard to follow the crime story part given the two realities scheme. I'll see if it coalesces any after this pilot but I have my doubts. Waste of Isaac's talent.

Personally I like all the closeups. And I'm sure it has noting to do with catering to the older aspect ratio as the size of the closeup is the same either way, and there are many shots where there is action in the extended 16x9 side areas as well. It's just a directorial preference and given that Awake seems to be character driven to a large extent, it feels quite appropriate to me. Not sure why following the two story lines with interrelated clues/connections on the crime investigations is an issue for some as it seemed pretty straight forward?


ron
post #66 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

I didn't notice your 4:3 comment, I'll have to pay more attention next week(yes I'll be back!) but definitely noticed the number of pores on the actors face Not only were their a large number of "head shots" but with NBCs extremely sharp 1080i(at least in my market) I felt like I should be turning down the sharpness of my HDTV.

That's just a style of cinematography. You can hit the actors with soft lighting to mask the imperfections in their faces (we all have them) or you can hit them with harsh lighting so you feel you're looking right at a human face. Clearly they wanted us to look right into Jason Isaac's face and feel his torment as a real human.
post #67 of 270
Is it just me or is there actually two Awake threads?
post #68 of 270
^^^this is the only one I could find with a search....perhaps you have a link to the other one?
Actually I couldn't even find this Awake thread by searching titles with the word Awake but my guess is because of the ticks (') before and after the work Awake....
post #69 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

That's just a style of cinematography. You can hit the actors with soft lighting to mask the imperfections in their faces (we all have them) or you can hit them with harsh lighting so you feel you're looking right at a human face. Clearly they wanted us to look right into Jason Isaac's face and feel his torment as a real human.

I've had people who appeared on TV series (they were in an original Star Trek episode) tell me the head shots were about actors not having to do anything but deliver lines so it saved time and money. I had come from watching my recording of CSI and which doesn't use that style so it was a bit of a contrast. Also I'll have to check again but noticed one of the two realities didn't have much set dressing so that might be a clue it is the "dream."

Large head shots look awful on a 53" screen but then I'm an artist and notice bad composition.
post #70 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by chestnu1 View Post

I watched the pilot online and I must say not bad. I think this will be one of those shows that you have to be paying attention in order to figure out what is going on. And if I had to take a guess as to the what the characters predicament is it is either a coma, near death experience, or like someone above said some form of purgatory. I just hope the show is on the air long enough to give me some answers.

Stipulating to the fact that the idea of dream vs. reality goes back at least as far as the '40s ("Dead of Night"), this spin on the theme seems to be interesting and very well done. I'll need to give it a few weeks. But I definitely agree with you that whether "Awake" survives or not will be completely uncorrelated with how good the show turns out to be, in which case I'll be careful not to become too "invested".
post #71 of 270
I think Awake's premise is intriguing and its cast wonderful. If the writers can manage to build on what they have given us so far, the show has a chance to go a long way. Looking forward to forthcoming episodes. Seeing Laura Innes in the previews made me hope that this show ends up being more imaginative than The Event. It wouldn't take much.
post #72 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

Large head shots look awful on a 53" screen but then I'm an artist and notice bad composition.

Go to a movie theater sometime. You'll see screaming closeups on a screen that will dwarf your puny little 53" television. This "bad composition" is as old as the silent era.
post #73 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by nlk10010 View Post

Stipulating to the fact that the idea of dream vs. reality goes back at least as far as the '40s ("Dead of Night"),

Are you talking about the Dead of Night based on the Richard Matheson story that was released back in the 70's?
post #74 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

Are you talking about the Dead of Night based on the Richard Matheson story that was released back in the 70's?

I believe the OP was talking about Dead of Night (1945) but it appears you were thinking about Dead of Night (1974). Thus, both of you seem to have been right. I probably saw the 1945 film but can't remember anything about it. Don't remember the 1974 film at all.
post #75 of 270
Damn, I've never seen the 1945 Dead of Night. It sounds fantastic although some people say it relies too much on narration. The 1977 Dead of Night was like a series of Twilight Zone episodes, much like the Twilight Zone movie a few years later. One story involved a dead son that keeps returning.
post #76 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

Go to a movie theater sometime. You'll see screaming closeups on a screen that will dwarf your puny little 53" television. This "bad composition" is as old as the silent era.

Rare in many modern movie productions. Part of studying filmmaking is learning how to compose the frame properly. In "Awake" they had close-ups that cut off the bottom and top of the head and that's probably a little "too close". They call that "shots only a dentist would enjoy." You can still do close-ups including a little above the top of the head and the top of shoulders and actors still won't need to worry about body language. But maybe they had a bad cinematographer on the shoot and will use someone else next time.

Anyway that was just one item that bugged me and I also didn't feel the writing was that good.
post #77 of 270
Can someone explain why reading the page with the words to the constitution was such a big deal?
post #78 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by David James View Post

Can someone explain why reading the page with the words to the constitution was such a big deal?

I'm thinking because he went to some random spot instead of an spot he might of read to the other shrink in the other reality was that shrink's way of showing he's still sane... or something like that.
post #79 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by David James View Post

Can someone explain why reading the page with the words to the constitution was such a big deal?

To prove to him that he was awake and not dreaming this. If this were a dream (his session with the female doc), he would have had to know the Constitution word-for-word already from his other supposed "real" world to use in this "dream." And that would be highly unlikely.
post #80 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by bruce73 View Post

To prove to him that he was awake and not dreaming this. If this were a dream (his session with the female doc), he would have had to know the Constitution word-for-word already from his other supposed "real" world to use in this "dream." And that would be highly unlikely.

That's kinda what she said, but I'm not following. He didn't need to have memorized anything, he was reading the words off the paper she gave him? Can't we read in dreams
post #81 of 270
I need to make sure I'm more awake myself when I watch the next episode. I was really tired when I watched it and found myself not sure what was going on. I may have to start watching the recording on Fridays.
post #82 of 270
Damn, I've never seen the 1945 Dead of Night. It sounds fantastic although some people say it relies too much on narration. The 1977 Dead of Night was like a series of Twilight Zone episodes, much like the Twilight Zone movie a few years later. One story involved a dead son that keeps returning.

I regard the 1945 Dead of Night as one of the greatest horror movies ever made. Haven't seen the 1977 version, but the original was a series of episodes too. The original was sort of an allegory of oncoming madness, and from someone with personal experience in the laughing academy I can tell you it succeeds like no other film.

Awake's premise is intriguing, but it looks as if, when all is said and done, it's going to be an eccentric police procedural. If it's not carefully planned in its writing it could all just fall apart. A "too many cooks" situation could kill the show.
post #83 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by David James View Post

That's kinda what she said, but I'm not following. He didn't need to have memorized anything, he was reading the words off the paper she gave him? Can't we read in dreams

He had not memorized the Constitution prior, so there would be no way he could have rattled off that passage, word perfect, in a dream. Very clever of the lady psychiatrist. So there's something else afoot here.

And there had better be, because if it's just another "eccentric police procedural", I'm outta' here.
post #84 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by David James View Post

That's kinda what she said, but I'm not following. He didn't need to have memorized anything, he was reading the words off the paper she gave him? Can't we read in dreams

I suppose, but what we already know and can re-create. Dreams are constructed of things rattling around in our sub-conscious. I doubt too many people would have the Constitution in there. Maybe the Preamble, if learned in school, but that's why the doc had him choose a passage at random deeper in.
post #85 of 270
No, you can't read or do math in dreams. You might know a number, or what something says, but if you try to actually read or do math it gets all jumbled - wrong side of the brain.
post #86 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

He had not memorized the Constitution prior, so there would be no way he could have rattled off that passage, word perfect, in a dream.

As shown in the show, he didn't rattle off anything, he read it from the sheets she printed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirjonsnow View Post

No, you can't read or do math in dreams. You might know a number, or what something says, but if you try to actually read or do math it gets all jumbled - wrong side of the brain.

That sounds good, except I've done all kinds of things in my dream which aren't supposed to be possible.
post #87 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

Rare in many modern movie productions. Part of studying filmmaking is learning how to compose the frame properly.

Hey, I took some film classes in college too. One thing we learned is there's no "proper" way to compose a frame, only guidelines. Just because a certain shot isn't popular in "modern movie productions" doesn't mean it has been declared unacceptable until the end of time. Everything in film production goes through trends and cycles. Directors spend more time studying old films to rip off old ideas than coming up with new ones.

Quote:


In "Awake" they had close-ups that cut off the bottom and top of the head and that's probably a little "too close".

Good heavens, watch the Matrix or any action movie in the past ten years. There are tons of close ups where they chop off everything above the actor's forehead and everything below the chin. I'm not a fan of them either but it is a 100% standard shot, especially on television. Pretty much every close up of Hugo on Lost was framed like this.
post #88 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by David James View Post

As shown in the show, he didn't rattle off anything, he read it from the sheets she printed.
That sounds good, except I've done all kinds of things in my dream which aren't supposed to be possible.

The fault with this classic test of reality is that in a dream, you have no way of knowing if you're right. In a dream, no one is going to tell you it's wrong.

How did he know he was reading the Constitution correctly? I figured they would have him read it incorrectly, then he would tell the male shrink what he had read that proved that this reality is false... only to have the male shrink print off the Constitution and discover that it's different from what he remembered reading.

That would lead to other questions. Which Constitution is right? Or did he just forget what he had read in the other reality? If he can't rely on his recollections of the other reality, how will he find a way to determine which one is the real one?
post #89 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

How did he know he was reading the Constitution correctly? I figured they would have him read it incorrectly, then he would tell the male shrink what he had read that proved that this reality is false... only to have the male shrink print off the Constitution and discover that it's different from what he remembered reading.

My guess is she picked the Constitution because of the way it's written -- in a style that wouldn't just flow off the tongue easily. I know I wouldn't be able to just start rattling off phrases in that stilted-sounding language that would make any sense. And this is a very lucid "dream" he's having. Plus, he could easily cleck it out the next day as you mention. I would.
post #90 of 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

But maybe they had a bad cinematographer on the shoot and will use someone else next time.

The Director of Photography on the pilot was Jo Willems, who is a fantastic cinematographer. I worked with him on the 'Touch' pilot. His other credits include 'Limitless', 'Hard Candy'. and '30 Days of Night', not to mention many, many commercials.

Your lack of appreciation for a particular composition does not necessarily mean it was a bad cinematographer. It could be more of an issue with you.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: HDTV Programming
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › 'Awake' on NBC HD