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It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World - Page 4

post #91 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42041 View Post

Well, all those were shot on 65mm or 8-perf 35mm negatives... not sure about Niagara.

For many reasons, the period of the late 50's through early 60's promoted a clean look.

-- as mentioned, the films you note were shot on 65mm film or Technirama (8 perf 35mm).
-- films were generally much better lit, which meant that there would be less grain and better color. Scenes that would look dark and lifeless today often looked very bright and colorful. [Take a look at the night scenes in The Ten Commandments for example.]
-- the "artistiic" use of grain, desaturated color, etc., was either not done or heavily criticized when it was.
-- epic films and roadshow presentations paid a lot of attention to costumes, sets, and splendid looking photography.
-- process shots were used when necessary but people preferred actually building things and using large crowds of real people. Look at The Fall of the Roman Empire compared to Gladiator (the same story!) for example. Empire actually built enormous sets, Gladiator used CGI that looks very crefty by comparison.

Everyone was aware that they were competing with TV and they had to make films look bigger, cleaner, and brighter to compete.


Beginning in the late 60's, a more "cinema-verite" style was used: grain, shakey cameras, poor color, poor lighting were often considered more artistic. This trend has to some extent continued to this day.
post #92 of 121
I watched this last night, and I was generally very pleased with the image. Clean and sharp, bright vivid colors, very nice. I did detect halos in a few scenes, but overall, not a problem.
post #93 of 121
Is this movie available at any Walmart in Canada?
post #94 of 121
I watched my copy last night, amazing colors. Or I am so used to today's color drained and dark style in movies that something shot almost 50 years ago looks stunning by comparison. The aspect ratio made me glad I had a 120" screen, the carefully composed shots that had multiple characters spread across the screen were a joy to behold. After all of these years watching badly cropped versions of this movie on TV and elsewhere I had forgotten just how much picture information was missing from the image I first saw on a Cinerama screen. If you're a fan its an easy recommendation - buy!
post #95 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post

The aspect ratio made me glad I had a 120" screen, the carefully composed shots that had multiple characters spread across the screen were a joy to behold. After all of these years watching badly cropped versions of this movie on TV and elsewhere I had forgotten just how much picture information was missing from the image I first saw on a Cinerama screen.

Definitely true. A good example is the scene where Hackett, Rooney, and Backus are just taking off in the Beech 18. Backus' character starts asking for a drink, but the best part is that off the sides you can see that he's still in the initial takeoff climb! Cropped versions always lose that nuance.
post #96 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post
The aspect ratio made me glad I had a 120" screen, the carefully composed shots that had multiple characters spread across the screen were a joy to behold.
LoL! Exactly my thoughts... "man, this is REALLY wide. Oh well, at least I'm watching it on a ten-footer!" I also have to give my enthusiastic support for this top-notch transfer. Its not without flaws, but finally having a quality release of this film at a VERY reasonable price is worth promoting.
post #97 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyDP View Post

I got it today and just got thru watching it. Its a great transfer with nice color, detail and no image processing in sight. At 2.76:1, you see some pretty major letterboxing even on a 16x9 TV and this is the 154 general release version. But given how little it costs there's no way anyone remotely interesting in this title can pass it up. Walmart is selling it for $10 and you get a $5 Vudu credit so the film essentially ends up costing you five bucks. A great deal all around.

Just picked this up. Haven't opened it. The packing says the AR is 2.55. But people here have talked about it being 2.76. What is it?
post #98 of 121
Looks like 2.76 to me.
post #99 of 121
Thanks
post #100 of 121
Will we ever see a 2.76 release of "The Hallelujah Trail" any time soon?

Also any word on other Cinerama Blu-Ray releases?
post #101 of 121
post #102 of 121
Phenominal improvement over DVD... but do I see halos or is it just chromatic aberration?
post #103 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanddrews View Post

Phenominal improvement over DVD... but do I see halos or is it just chromatic aberration?

I don't know, are you watching the Blu-ray or looking at ridiculous screen caps. It's a great transfer and there are NO HALOES anywhere.
post #104 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanddrews View Post

Phenominal improvement over DVD... but do I see halos or is it just chromatic aberration?

Yeah. You're seeing halos.

But they are within the realm of acceptability.

Pretty much all transfers have them to one degree or another. Just like in digital still photography, a degree of sharpening is considered necessary to compensate for softness introduced by the mechanics of digtal imagining. MAD...WORLD is pretty good in this respect but doesn't quite keep the halos below the level of perception. We can still see them. But compared to most transfers, these ones aren't worth being too concerned about.

Oh yes...I own the disc. (both DVD and BD).
post #105 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanddrews View Post

Phenominal improvement over DVD... but do I see halos or is it just chromatic aberration?

Sharpening is a bit too much for my taste. Better to watch this with all sharpening circuits set to off. It is looking really good though and much better than the other releases of movies shot in Ultra Panavision 70 (Mutiny on the Bounty, Battle of the Bulge, The Greatest Story Ever Told, Fall of the Roman Empire) that range from mediocre at best to hideous.
post #106 of 121
Bought this for $10 bucks but have not looked at it yet because I saw it recently on HDTV, I told myself not to watch but could not resist. I suspect that like in the caps it will be a bit processed looking although much better then the HDTV version.
post #107 of 121
OMG that capture looks great. I cued up my DVD on the PC and then on the big screen via the PS3 to that exact scene and the difference is VERY noticeable. The only problem I have is that on my DVD, which is 2.55:1, there is the black bars at the top and bottom. And as your screen capture shows, there is an extra 3 feet of that office that I have never seen. The 2.77:1 BRD is going to look really nice, but also smaller on my 55".
post #108 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaScope Man View Post

Will we ever see a 2.76 release of "The Hallelujah Trail" any time soon?


Also any word on other Cinerama Blu-Ray releases?

Any word on a Blu-Ray of the above?
post #109 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaScope Man View Post

Any word on a Blu-Ray of the above?
Not for Hallelujah Trail, though plenty of folks are clamoring for it.
post #110 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by zarg7883 View Post


Definitely true. A good example is the scene where Hackett, Rooney, and Backus are just taking off in the Beech 18. Backus' character starts asking for a drink, but the best part is that off the sides you can see that he's still in the initial takeoff climb! Cropped versions always lose that nuance.
Another point where the wide aspect really pays off is in the "kick the bucket" scene. The characters are all lined up on the side of the cliff and it's like a one shot who's who of comedy.

Nothing annoys me more than filmmakers who choose an aspect ratio, then fail to use it to good visual effect - often leaving blank holes or simply frame the movie as if they assume the sides will be cut off for TV - so why bother putting anything important outside of the center 4x3...

That's not an issue for It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad world. The Sound of Music is another one that requires that wide aspect, especially when the kids get lined up in one shot. Even a film like Stand by Me does a great job at framing to tell us things that don't need to be said. Of course, then there's Citizen Kane which did wonders with the opposite extreme, an academy aspect ratio where close-ups, dollies or crane moves take over where vistas aren't possible.

It's always refreshing to see great composition. It feels like someone actually cared. Now days, the attitude is usually "we'll fix it in post"...
Edited by NetworkTV - 7/12/13 at 4:29pm
post #111 of 121
New Blu-Ray coming in January from Criterion Collection. New 4K restoration from the general release version of the film - 159 minutes - and an HD restoration of a reconstructed extended cut of the film - 197 minutes - that was supervised by Robert Harris. 5.1 DTS-HD-MA on both cuts and gobs of extras too.
post #112 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post

New Blu-Ray coming in January from Criterion Collection. New 4K restoration from the general release version of the film - 159 minutes - and an HD restoration of a reconstructed extended cut of the film - 197 minutes - that was supervised by Robert Harris. 5.1 DTS-HD-MA on both cuts and gobs of extras too.

Wow, finally!

http://www.criterion.com/films/28579-it-s-a-mad-mad-mad-mad-world
post #113 of 121
Finally is right. I thought the waiting-for-announcement drama would never end.wink.gif

Price be damned, I couldn't order it fast enough.
post #114 of 121
Ordered!
post #115 of 121
Awesome, awesome, awesome, awesome!
post #116 of 121
Mad Mad World is bar none the best movie to watch before the ball drops on new years eve night!
You start watching right after dinner around 9pm and before you know it- it's midnight. Although with the new extended version we're going to have to start watching during dessert! biggrin.gif
post #117 of 121
This is truly epic. I still have the roadshow? brochure my mom bought me when we were leaving the theater.

Sid Caesar trying to shush the fireworks is as funny as funny can get.
post #118 of 121
Here is a first look of the Criterion version with a comparison vs the MGM:

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film3/blu-ray_reviews56/its_a_mad_mad_mad_mad_world_blu-ray.htm

Clearly both are from the same master with the Extended Criterion in the images crisper then the MGM which also show the source EE more slightly more obvious (did he just write that?). The reviewer claims there is a color grading difference but I cannot see that in the caps. I am sure some will have wild conspiracy theories.
post #119 of 121
Sharpness discrepancy is due to DVDBeaver's bad caps.
post #120 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by rlsmith View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by 42041 View Post

Well, all those were shot on 65mm or 8-perf 35mm negatives... not sure about Niagara.


For many reasons, the period of the late 50's through early 60's promoted a clean look.


-- as mentioned, the films you note were shot on 65mm film or Technirama (8 perf 35mm).

-- films were generally much better lit, which meant that there would be less grain and better color. Scenes that would look dark and lifeless today often looked very bright and colorful. [Take a look at the night scenes in The Ten Commandments for example.]

-- the "artistiic" use of grain, desaturated color, etc., was either not done or heavily criticized when it was.

-- epic films and roadshow presentations paid a lot of attention to costumes, sets, and splendid looking photography.

-- process shots were used when necessary but people preferred actually building things and using large crowds of real people. Look at The Fall of the Roman Empire compared to Gladiator (the same story!) for example. Empire actually built enormous sets, Gladiator used CGI that looks very crefty by comparison.


Everyone was aware that they were competing with TV and they had to make films look bigger, cleaner, and brighter to compete.



Beginning in the late 60's, a more "cinema-verite" style was used: grain, shakey cameras, poor color, poor lighting were often considered more artistic. This trend has to some extent continued to this day.
Those are very good points, especially when it comes to films shot on Hollywood studio sets. I was watching the Pillow Talk (1959) BD and the cinematography is never really pushed past a stage production, so its sharpness and overall picture quality is quite pleasing for a Cinemascope movie. Universal slathered the transfer with too much edge enhancement, but that is another story.
Edited by Phantom Stranger - 1/17/14 at 12:39pm
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