or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › 3D Central › 3D Content › Hugo Cabret - November 2011 - Dir. by Martin Scorsese
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hugo Cabret - November 2011 - Dir. by Martin Scorsese - Page 6

post #151 of 175
On my Epson 3010 I saw more crosstalk than I ever have in many other movies. Something about Hugo that delivers crosstalk in displays vulnerable to it. Sometimes it appears as a shadow along the edge of a face, and is fairly distracting. Appears this movie may be the best advertisement for DLPLink yet.
post #152 of 175
I was looking forward to Hugo's release as I'd read about its outstanding 3D presentation. I instead found it to have a very minimal 3D feeling to it. Just like many of you, I have pretty much all of the 3D content sold over the past year and a half and this is the first one I had to check if my 3D was working. Did many of you had to change settings for this movie? Like I said, my system works great with all other 3D movies. Thanks for playing.
post #153 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonytinoco View Post

I was looking forward to Hugo's release as I'd read about its outstanding 3D presentation. I instead found it to have a very minimal 3D feeling to it. Just like many of you, I have pretty much all of the 3D content sold over the past year and a half and this is the first one I had to check if my 3D was working. Did many of you had to change settings for this movie? Like I said, my system works great with all other 3D movies. Thanks for playing.

Don't understand why you had that experience. The 3D was immersive, gorgeous and presented depth inside and in front of the screen window. Except for the beaten to death topic of some x talk, Hugo's 3D was on the same level as Avatar.
post #154 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve ans View Post

Don't understand why you had that experience. The 3D was immersive, gorgeous and presented depth inside and in front of the screen window. Except for the beaten to death topic of some x talk, Hugo's 3D was on the same level as Avatar.

I agree. I thought the 3D was spectacular. I saw very little crosstalk at all on my X3. Depth and pop out were appropriate and immersive.

S~
post #155 of 175
LG's new new passive LM7600 TV was on display at Best Buy this morning and it was playing, among other things, the Hugo trailer. I watched it all the way thru; it had zero crosstalk and really strong and very obvious depth and pop. I also own a 2010 Samsung 3D plasma and have had many instances of wondering if my TV was working properly because I saw little 3D even though reviews were far more positive. I think the age and type of technology can be a real factor in how 3D presentations look. I decided to buy the 7600 (it will arrive next week) and I'm going to pick up Hugo from Amazon; I'll be curious to see how it performs on both my rigs.
post #156 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyDP View Post

LG's new new passive LM7600 TV was on display at Best Buy this morning and it was playing, among other things, the Hugo trailer. I watched it all the way thru; it had zero crosstalk and really strong and very obvious depth and pop. I also own a 2010 Samsung 3D plasma and have had many instances of wondering if my TV was working properly because I saw little 3D even though reviews were far more positive. I think the age and type of technology can be a real factor in how 3D presentations look. I decided to buy the 7600 (it will arrive next week) and I'm going to pick up Hugo from Amazon; I'll be curious to see how it performs on both my rigs.


TonyDP - I, too, have a 2010 Samsung Plasma ... maybe it's exactly what yo suggest regarding aged technology. This is the first instance that Ive run into this problem. Thanks for your input...it makes sense.
post #157 of 175
I own a Sony 55HX729. I have cross talk in Hugo when the automaton is featured in a shot. Having bought Tintin, there is zero cross talk in it having viewed about half so far. I believe, too, that cross talk is hardware based but it is odd that some 3D movies are perfect with out cross talk. That being said, i viewed a current model (didn't take note of what model) Samsung 3D at BB today that was being demoed with the Hugo trailer and it had much less 3D than my Sony. The Panasonic next to it seemed dark but no cross talk on either. My TV does have the brightest 3D presentation that I've seen but does exhibit that pesky cross talk at times.
post #158 of 175
Thread Starter 
Different amounts of 3D with the exact same content is usually a result of someone changing the 3D viewpoint on the TV menu. With the exact same content, you can make it look like your TV is an aquarium, with things appearing near the surface and subtly popping out; or make it look like it's a window, where everything is deep inside.
post #159 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefoo View Post

Different amounts of 3D with the exact same content is usually a result of someone changing the 3D viewpoint on the TV menu. With the exact same content, you can make it look like your TV is an aquarium, with things appearing near the surface and subtly popping out; or make it look like it's a window, where everything is deep inside.

True the amount of 3D is adjustable but I leave it on auto. The Samsung looked drab, however.
post #160 of 175
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve ans View Post

True the amount of 3D is adjustable but I leave it on auto. The Samsung looked drab, however.

But my point is you observed differences between your TV and the store model TVs, and you only know for sure what your TV was set to.
post #161 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefoo View Post

But my point is you observed differences between your TV and the store model TVs, and you only know for sure what your TV was set to.

Yes you are correct. I remember looking at the Sony 3D demo in Best Buy in December. It looked terrible. All the settings had to be messed up so I stand corrected.
post #162 of 175
Thread Starter 
Yes, there's a high chance that the 3D setting is going to be messed with. People will mess with the store demos and really throw the image out of whack without even realizing it.

I usually push things back just a little to improve the illusion of scale. The guy I bought my TV from had it set way high and in the complete opposite direction, and when I showed him what I preferred and explained what the setting was doing, he was completely surprised. And he owned multiple 3DTVs, so the average Joe shopper playing with store demos is going to be even more clueless.
post #163 of 175
I leave the 3D settings in default and am very pleased with the 3D. The only Achilles Heal is occasional cross talk. Images are otherwise bright and clear. I was watching "The Adventures of Tintin" tonight and that 3D Blu ray is incredible (no X talk either).
post #164 of 175
The 3D was the best I've seen so far and the sets were lush and filled with minute detail. The near/far (depth-of-field) focus was well done for 3D as opposed to Avatar (at least for me). Also very little judder and no crosstalk on my Optoma HD3300. That said, I thought the story dragged, but then turned into a tribute to George Melies and early special effects, which I found very interesting, but thought that most people who have never taken a course in movie history would find very questionable or even a little daffy--though quite accurate--look up Milies in Wikipedia--although the Automaton was probably a little more sophisticated technically than in reality (yes Melies had one he used during his shows), but it was the story's bridge device between the boy and Melies. Even the studio was the same as the movie and of course the boy hanging on the clock hands was taken right out early silent movies. Obviously, Scorsese was trying to show how far special effects have come--especially with the train-off-the-track scene. Lots of cgi, but well integrated into the set so hard to tell the difference.
post #165 of 175
This was a blind buy for me, I wasn't sure about it before I got it, turns out I was pleasantly surprised
post #166 of 175
Had some people over to watch this the other night. Heard quite a few "wow"s at the 3D during the movie
post #167 of 175
I finally watched this on my 2010 Samsung 3D plasma yesterday. The 3D effect was very strong, very immersive with a really nice sense of depth and height, especially with the gears and machinery within the clocks. Panoramic shots of the Paris and the train station seemed to go on forever and closeups also had nice depth with articles of clothing like the stationmaster's hat seeming to protrude from the screen. Not too many popouts but the ones on display worked well such as the dog snarling right out of the camera or the pirates swinging their swords during the flashbacks of Melies creating his films.

Ghosting was pretty visible on my plasma and, as expected, it mostly revolved around scenes of extreme contrast ranges such as the shiny metal of the automaton against the dark background, Hugo's pale face against his dark hair, and Melies' while shirt against his black tux near the end. This has always been a tripping point for plasma 3D displays so I wasn't surprised to see it here. I also had a slight headache after watching the movie and that's something I typically don't experience with active shutter 3D. I'm having an LG 7600 passive TV delivered Thursday and I'll be curious to see how it holds up with that technology.

In spite of the ghosting issues, I do think Hugo marks the best use of 3D yet; it definitely serves the story and helps to pull you in. Considering the film is a celebration of one of the pioneers of creative filmmaking, the use of 3D seems even more appropriate.
post #168 of 175
Wife and I watched this last night. Bought on reputation alone as we did not even know what it was really about. Fantastic overall. The 3D was great (2010 Samsung plasma). The story was interesting. Acting was great, even though I thought of the movie Kick Ass everytime the little girl was on. Thumbs up all around.
post #169 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbtrinet View Post

I was experiencing horrible cross-talk with two Blu-Rays - Drive Angry and Rio. All the other 30+ 3D blu-rays I watched looked great. At first, I thought that those must be bad blu-rays, but no.... It just took a firmware update of my blu-ray player, and Drive Angry and Rio were watchable. I'm suspecting this might be the same for others who are having issues with Hugo.
I have a digital copy of Rio 3d and it was unwatchable because the left and right images were reversed. Once I changed the L-R settings to correct this the movie looked fine. Perhaps the the firmware update made your bluray player auto detect this and adjust accordingly. Hugo is a different story. It just has a lot of crosstalk.
post #170 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icon13 View Post

I have a digital copy of Rio 3d and it was unwatchable because the left and right images were reversed. Once I changed the L-R settings to correct this the movie looked fine. Perhaps the the firmware update made your bluray player auto detect this and adjust accordingly. Hugo is a different story. It just has a lot of crosstalk.
Definitely agree in my case, too. Hugo big time cross talk and the worst of all my 3D movies. I have a 2011 SONY KDL-55HX729. A friend recently got a 2012 KDL-55HX850 and we played Hugo and guess what? No crosstalk! So, Sony must have tweaked something to eliminate crosstalk in certain movies. I have about 30 3D movies and most show very little to no cross talk.
post #171 of 175
You folks do realize that it's impossible for crosstalk to come from the source, right? It's not the film, it's your hardware.
post #172 of 175
Yes and like I said above, Sony must have tweaked their 2012 HX850 model. However, I will also say certain films are more challenging for certain hardware. One of the reviewers of HUGO at the Blu-ray forum had the same complaint. I do agree it is the hardware but In also feel the way the 3D was done in this movie caused issues for more TVs. I recently bought The Amazing Spiderman and no X talk at all. Go figure.
post #173 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve ans View Post

I do agree it is the hardware but In also feel the way the 3D was done in this movie caused issues for more TVs.

High contrast images, such as bright lights on a dark background, that aren't near the depth of the screen can be problematic for displays prone to ghosting. If you see ghosting there, it's because your display's pixels aren't able to switch between dark and light fast enough. There's really nothing they can do when making the movie or the Blu-ray to keep certain TVs from ghosting unless they deliberately reduced contrast and depth, which wouldn't be a good idea. As such, in fairness to the movie and to prevent confusion for those who don't know the technical side of ghosting, I think we should avoid phrasing such as "Hugo has ghosting" and instead go with something more like "my TV shows ghosting with Hugo."
post #174 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Airion View Post

High contrast images, such as bright lights on a dark background, that aren't near the depth of the screen can be problematic for displays prone to ghosting. If you see ghosting there, it's because your display's pixels aren't able to switch between dark and light fast enough. There's really nothing they can do when making the movie or the Blu-ray to keep certain TVs from ghosting unless they deliberately reduced contrast and depth, which wouldn't be a good idea. As such, in fairness to the movie and to prevent confusion for those who don't know the technical side of ghosting, I think we should avoid phrasing such as "Hugo has ghosting" and instead go with something more like "my TV shows ghosting with Hugo."
Well, I do agree it's a hardware thing but your explanation doesn't really fit since I have other 3D movies that have contrast and a lot of depth and yet X talk isn't there. Sometimes, I see a little and just as often I see none. I agree that Sony's HX850 "fixed" this issue, I still don't know the reason. i have 240Hz with 480 Motionflow backlight scanning. The HX850 has 240Hz and 960 Motionflow backlight scanning. In any event, it is rare I see the issue, love my TV, and just think Hugo was a poorly made 3D movie by a bad director (actually just kidding:)smile.gifsmile.gif).
post #175 of 175
It wouldn't surprise me if other changes, such as one color to another, could also prove difficult for some displays. You'd also need the two together: high contrast at screen depth won't show ghosting (the left and right images are roughly aligned, so the pixels don't have to change much if at all), just as low contrast at depth wouldn't. And of course, you have to happen to notice it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: 3D Content
AVS › AVS Forum › 3D Central › 3D Content › Hugo Cabret - November 2011 - Dir. by Martin Scorsese