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3D Led vs 3D Plasma? - Page 2

post #31 of 60
Thread Starter 
What does everyone think of this comparison...
Dlpreview.com

Plasma and DLP are two relatively new display technologies, which have begun to compete broadly for their respective shares of the hi-resolution television market. Despite similar target audiences, these technologies differ widely in the ways they process light-source information.
Plasma technology consists hundreds of thousands of individual pixel cells, which allow electric pulses (stemming from electrodes) to excite rare natural gases-usually xenon and neon-causing them to glow and, thus, produce light. This light illuminates the proper balance of red, green, or blue phosphors contained in each cell to display the proper color sequence from the light. Each pixel cell is essentially an individual microscopic florescent light bulb, receiving instruction from software contained on the back electrostatic silicon board.
DLP (Digital Light Processing) technology utilizes a small Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) to tilt more than 1.3 million micromirrors-each of them less than the width of a human hair-toward (ON) or away from (OFF) the light source inside the DLP. This process creates light or dark pixels on the face of the projection screen. The light then filters to a color wheel, which rotates 120 times per second, producing the correct hue. Each mirror can turn on or off several thousands of times per second resulting in a technology that can reproduce up to 1024 shades of gray. In short, the gradations in color that make DLP images stand-out are the result of color filters backlit by just the right intensity of white light. There are 4 main components in the system: the DMD chip, color wheel, light source, and optics. Light from the lamp passes through a color wheel filter and into the DMD chip which will switch its mirrors on or off in relation to the color reflecting off them, producing an image.


PICTURE CONSIDERATIONSCONTRAST
- The measure of the darkest black in relation to the lightest white
Plasma technology has come a long way in this area. We've all heard Panasonic boast of having achieved 3000:1 and 4000:1 contrast ratings. And though these are certainly self-serving figures, I have to admit that the black levels are looking very good these days, while still showing a lot of definition. Some plasma manufacturers have not quite achieved such black levels yet, so the average contrast ratio for plasma technology as a whole is about 1000:1 or so. This figure takes into account brands from China and Taiwan that have just entered the market.
Since it is a relatively new technology, DLP displays do not have much of a track record. Samsung cites a contrast ratio of 1000:1 for their 50" DLP TV. RCA, on the other hand, does not list a contrast ratio. Nevertheless, when I compare the black levels of RCA and Samsung DLP TVs to those of Toshiba and Panasonic plasma TVs, my eyes (and my light meters) tell me the plasmas have the superior black levels-by 30% or so.

Advantage: Plasma


CLARITY - The measure of clean edges and lines around and inside images.
This is an interesting topic to consider because, in my opinion, it depends upon which plasma or DLP you're viewing. Both technologies are known to have excellent clarity. However, clarity of reproduced film content depends upon the internal conversion chipset, so it varies from plasma to plasma-as much as it varies from plasma to DLP. DLP appears to have inherent display clarity by virtue of the clean mirror technology it utilizes. Plasma requires mega processing and conversion, which often succeeds at producing crystal clear images and occasionally fails miserably.
Issues like clarity also depend upon the signal being viewed. HDTV will appear perfectly clear on either plasma sets or DLP ones. Which means that DVD film content should prove an excellent head-to-head test for both plasma and DLP displays.
In my tests, plasma exceeded DLP in the clarity with which it reproduced DVD signals, though not by much. That much was evident to this reviewer, but it did take some time to sort out. The Toshiba and Panasonic plasmas outperformed the Samsung and RCA DLP TVs by roughly 10% overall.

Advantage: Plasma


COLOR SATURATION AND ACCURACY
There is no question among onlookers that plasma technology has the advantage here. Colors appear richer, fuller, and deeper-which are precisely the traits one looks for in a great TV picture. With good Japanese brands of plasma displays, the factory settings are usually good enough to receive a picture that is virtually "spot on" with SEMPTE color standards of 6500K, thus eliminating the need for do-it-yourself picture calibration.
DLP has good color in some areas, but it is frequently spotty-missing some green here, some blue there. DLP televisions are relatively new inventions, so this could be an area of great improvement in the future. While color vibrancy is superb with DLP compared to other rear projection solutions, colors appear hazy (bright yet slightly pale or faint) next to those produced by plasmas. Hence, the Toshiba and Panasonic Plasma TVs get the nod by 25% over the Samsung and RCA DLP models.

Advantage: Plasma


BRIGHTNESS

This is the real genius of DLP technology when compared to its counterpart rear-projection televisions. DLPs also have a tremendous viewing angle, which differentiates them from the rest of the pack of projection TVs. DLP displays are bright and have nothing to burn out, except for a lamp that (in some cases) can be easily replaced.
The plasma TVs I reviewed are equally as bright as the DLPs, only the former look bright in different ways. The DLP brightness level washes out color richness. The picture on the Toshiba plasma is rich and consistently vibrant.

Advantage: Chalk it up to preference


VIDEO PLAYBACK

Everyone seems to agree that the two Plasma displays showed better with any video playback, though the difference is much less discernable with poor quality satellite or cable signals. DLP does a great job of processing this information, that is, for a rear projection TV.

Advantage: Plasma


OTHER CONSIDERATIONS SIZE

DLP televisions are rear-projection devices and thus quite well suited to larger sizes. In most cases, they require nearly the amount of room that traditional rear projection TVs do-minus the base, of course. DLP TVs fit well on to tabletop stands and are available in popular 40-, 50-, and 61-inch models. They will soon be available in 72- and 84-inch diagonal image sizes, too. Moreover, DLPs are slimmer than other rear projection TVs, measuring around 15" to 17" in depth. RCA claims to have a couple of prototypes in the 50- and 61-inch size image range that will actually hang on the wall! Manufacturers are working hard to create slimmer DLP displays to suit more applications. By late 2004, you can expect to see new prototypes being rolled out that are as slim as 8" in depth. Stay tuned.
Plasma television displays range in size from 37" to 61" along the diagonal. Plasma technology allows for a super slim design-the norm being 3.5" in depth-allowing them to be mounted in various ways on walls or set atop tables or on even on special plasma TV carts. Plasma displays are designed with minimalist decorators in mind: They have little in the way of bezel framing, and speakers are often optional. If you want an exceptionally "clean" look for your home theater, think plasma.

Advantage: Even


PRICE/VALUE

DLP televisions clearly possess the price advantage over plasma per viewing inch. The technology is much less expensive to product than plasma. The Texas Instruments DMD chip must is, of course, no small part of the displays overall production cost. The screen is also different from other rear projection devices and not inexpensive. You may have noticed the draught in DLP product in the fall of 2003. This was primarily due to difficulty in production capacity of the front screen panel-not the DMD chips. Aside from this, though, the modern DLP utilizes a lot of technologically commonplace materials in its design, which helps to offset the cost of its processor and screen.
Plasma TVs have been steadily encroaching upon affordability in the last few years. Many new manufacturing plants have opened in China and Korea that produce the glass panel, which is the chief plasma display element. As more plasmas displays flood the market, prices will continue to fall. Inch for inch, plasma technology will continue to beat-out LCD technology, but the former will have a more difficult time keeping pace with DLP technology.
Price Advantage: DLP per square inch. Value Advantage: Difficult to gauge. Depends on the need.



MENU OPTIONS/ FUNCTIONALITY

The Toshiba and Panasonic plasma TVs I tested had clear and easy-to-control settings for the most part, though the Panasonic manual left something to be desired.
The menu settings and control options for the RCA and Samsung DLP TVs, on the other hand, were anything but clear and direct. For example, changing the green tint through the menu options on the RCA DLP required six steps. All in all, the menus offered on the DLPs were cryptic and not very user-friendly.

Advantage: Plasma-for the time being, anyway.


COMPUTER USE

Most plasma displays have computer input, many even having the split screen option, which allows for surfing the web while watching television. Now that is information overload! This was the case with the Panasonic I tested.
Rear projection DLP TVs are designed primarily for use as home-entertainment devices. Most DLPs are not meant to do double-duty as computer monitors.


Advantage: Plasma


VIEWING ANGLE

Along with D-ILA, DLPs are the best of the best among rear-projection TV technologies. Still, they are far from perfect. The eyeball test of effective viewing gives me about a 100° side-to-side viewing angle. One very important note here is that, with DLPs, the vertical positioning of the display should be very close to eye level. The vertical viewing angle on DLP televisions is far less protracted than its side-to-side viewing angle. Indeed, the vertical viewing angles of the DLPs I tested were maybe 40° or so.
Because each individual pixel is its own light and color source, plasma-display TVs are evenly lit across the surface and have a nearly perfect 180° viewing angle. This figure is uniform across all manufacturers and applies to side-to-side and to top-to-bottom viewing angles.

Advantage: Plasma


ALTITUDE

DLP technology is not affected by altitude considerations.
Since the plasma display element on a plasma TV is actually a glass substrate envelope containing rare natural gases, thinner air causes increased stress on the gases inside the envelope. This increases the amount of power required to run and cool the plasma, which causes louder buzzing or fan noise (do to the unit's increased self-cooling efforts). These problems usually start to occur at around 6500 feet. Lately, some plasma manufacturers such as NEC and Sony have come out with special models capable of handling altitudes to up to 8500 feet without noticeable increases in unit noise.

Advantage: DLP


LIFESPAN

DLP manufacturers list the backlight bulb hours at around 80,000 hours. What's more, this bulb can be replaced for as little as $200 in some cases. Certain DLP TV displays require a technician to change their bulbs, and this will cost you more than the lamp itself. In other cases, though, the DLP is configured in a way that makes it easy for a layperson to replace burned-out bulbs. It all depends on the make and model of your DLP.
And, since DLP is a mirror and light technology, once the bulb is replaced, the DLP should perform as well as it did when it was brand new.
Plasma, by contrast, uses a small electric pulse for each pixel to excite the rare natural gases argon, neon, and xenon (a k a "phosphors") to produce the color information and light. As electrons excite the phosphors, oxygen atoms dissipate. These rare gases actually have a life and fade over time. Manufacturers of plasma have estimated the life of these phosphors to be about 60,000 hours. The life of the plasma display itself is usually determined by half-life of the phosphors. So at 30,000 hours the phosphors will be at their half-life, and the viewer will be seeing an image that has half the brightness capability that it did when originally purchased. This should be a good point at which to consider its life over. The gases in plasma TVs cannot be replaced. There is no phenomenon of "pumping" new gases into a plasma display.

Advantage: DLP
post #32 of 60
Thread Starter 
Based on the information here which I assume came out in 2003 has DLP technology caught up with plasma in these areas or has plasma technology stretched the gap?
post #33 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgarrison1 View Post

Based on the information here which I assume came out in 2003 has DLP technology caught up with plasma in these areas or has plasma technology stretched the gap?

Much, if not all, of the information is old, outdated, or just plain wrong.

Does anyone else find it suspicious that a website called DLPTVREVIEW.com lists all but two comparisons as "Advantage: Plasma" and has Plasma vs. DLP, Plasma vs. LCD, Plasma vs. OLED "articles", but no LCD vs OLED, DLP vs OLED or LCD vs DLP?
post #34 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augerhandle View Post


Much, if not all, of the information is old, outdated, or just plain wrong.

Does anyone else find it suspicious that a website called DLPTVREVIEW.com lists all but two comparisons as "Advantage: Plasma" and has Plasma vs. DLP, Plasma vs. LCD, Plasma vs. OLED "articles", but no LCD vs OLED, DLP vs OLED or LCD vs DLP?

I guess that means that you feel as though this is an unfair, inaccurate, inclusive, outdated comparison...ok got it.

What we do know is that large screen projections are indeed plasma, led, and lcd. Like in stadiums and large arenas that are willing to pay the electric bill. Alteast the better looking ones are. Imo. They aren't dlp, plasma or led alone they are a combination of the three.
Conversly, because of the multi-colored light wheels within the projectors and lack of sunlight the front and rear projectors perform better in these environments so your point is well taken.
Especially, when we talk about longevity and a few minor bulb replacements vs another $1500 plasma after 5 years or so
It makes sense to go dlp. Especially when you add size to the equation.
I owned a few old used school dlps and dvds still looked good on those, so as years have passed I'm sure these technologies have improved. I'm going to give the dlp strong considerations.
post #35 of 60
Thread Starter 
Heres another angle,

I've been reading post on flashing the pn51d550 to a pn51d7000
(Not sure that includes the applications)
Any thoughts on that for the $900 sticker?

or

just going with the pn51d6500 for $1170 since some of the differences between the 6500 and 7000 are the frame and real black filter.

Pn51d8000 $1500
Pn51d7000 $1260
Pn51d6500 $1170
Pn51d550 $900
post #36 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgarrison1 View Post

[snip]...What we do know is that large screen projections are indeed plasma. Like in stadiums and large arenas that are willing to pay the electric bill. They aren't dlp. ...

Mitsubishi DiamondVision

http://www.diamond-vision.com/install_image.asp?id=146

http://www.diamond-vision.com/index.asp
post #37 of 60
Thread Starter 
It appears to be such a shared technology between these big screens. What company, what type of display, the image it can produce and on and on.
I think that we all can agree that the cars in nascar are fast as are the horses in the Kentucky Derby. Even though they have different engines, manufactures, pedigree, riders and drivers.

All these factors produce something fast.

http://www.clearly-av.co.uk/blog/big...onsters-of-tv/

When I compared 3 different displays(DLP/ LED/ Plasma) I came to the following conclusions:

DLP
The off angle when light was prominent darkened the picture a bit too much for me. Dark movie room...DLP would work the best for me in that arena, not in an apartment livingroom near a window. And I was a little concerned with non HD content not displaying well.

LED vs Plasma
When displaying the same content side by side here were the contenders,
UN55D8000 vs PN51D8000
The first thing I noticed was the color differences. The plasma was more vivid and had a fuller range of colors. The LED looked pale at times. The LED showed more detail. Small areas displayed clearer and crisper which for gaming this is very important for me.
Response time 8000d LED 2ms
Response time 8000d plasma .001
This response time is equally important concerning gaming and action movies or sports.

The image on the LED
Having owned a Samsung led I noticed corner blooming during dark scenes as the tv was edge lit. And that was very irritating. This one uses backlighting and I noticed that during certain dark or high color full screen scenes when side by side to the plasma. It looked like the whole screen was blooming.
The led looked light an X-ray machine with a picture on it next to a actual picture. There was a lot it light coming through. I convinced my buddy to turn down the backlighting to try and even the pictures. And it didn't help much. I noticed this especially from side views.
All things being considered I understand that neither of these store displays were professionally calibrated for optimal picture quality.

Led's are not immune to image retention and plasmas are more vulnerable.
For the fuller colors, faster response times, darker black levels, better side viewing and price I have to go with plasma.

Now this was what I didn't like about the 8000d series plasma as compared to the 8000d Led by Samsung:
No web browser
No Bluetooth glasses compatibility
I really don't know why these technologies were left out of the plasmas models, but most I can think of is maybe this was a way for Samsung to get more sales on their 7000 and 8000 series LEDs.
post #38 of 60
Thread Starter 
http://m.cnet.com/Article.rbml?nid=2...null&test=null

Because of news such as the link above and this ever changing world of technology, I'm going to spend low and prepare for what's to come in the not to distant future.

Going with the PN51D6500

Got a great deal for $900
post #39 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgarrison1 View Post

It appears to be such a shared technology between these big screens. What company, what type of display, the image it can produce and on and on.
I think that we all can agree that the cars in nascar are fast as are the horses in the Kentucky Derby. Even though they have different engines, manufactures, pedigree, riders and drivers.

All these factors produce something fast.

http://www.clearly-av.co.uk/blog/big...onsters-of-tv/

...

From your link

Quote:


This list is intended to make home theater enthusiasts...wonder why they ever bought that puny 50-inch plasma!

Glad you finally made a decision. Have fun with your set. I'm sure you'll enjoy it.
post #40 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by accohn12 View Post

I agree that you can't really go by what BB sales people say, but he definitely has made me rethink my decision, at least temporarily. I have been also reading up on the Sammy PN51d7000, which has some great reviews, and is a great price right now on Amazon. I LOVE the look (bezel) of the UN46D7000, but I obviously want to consider pic quality as well.

So tru, bb employee are so tech illiterate and they really dont care to understand about the technical details. You have to read here and magazines to get the real scoop.

As far as 3d, I may use about 2% of the time. I upgraded from sam c7000 to lg lw5600 passive. I'm very happy with the upgrade. Especially when the kids come over.
post #41 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augerhandle View Post


Much, if not all, of the information is old, outdated, or just plain wrong.

Does anyone else find it suspicious that a website called DLPTVREVIEW.com lists all but two comparisons as "Advantage: Plasma" and has Plasma vs. DLP, Plasma vs. LCD, Plasma vs. OLED "articles", but no LCD vs OLED, DLP vs OLED or LCD vs DLP?

Yeah, but 12 in Sony oled screen costs 3000$ last time I checked. Imagine what a 70 in oled would cost? Sharp led quattro 70 in is $2600?
post #42 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aj5000 View Post
Yeah, but 12 in Sony oled screen costs 3000$ last time I checked. Imagine what a 70 in oled would cost? Sharp led quattro 70 in is $2600?
My point was that it appears to be a plasma biased site disguised as a DLP site.
post #43 of 60
Thread Starter 
Ok, switched the plan...got a great deal on a Sony KDL 46NX810 FOR $750 I'm sure it will work well with the ps3 too.
post #44 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by conan48 View Post

Actually the Samsung D8000 LED was said to have the least amount of crosstalk. Less then the Panasonic VT30, and Samsung Plasma.

So DLP wins for no crosstalk and followed by the new LED Samsung, and Plasma is in last for both crosstalk and brightness.

No offense but, I have to see this to believe it!. I demoed the 2011 Samsung LED set (didn't remember the model #) when they first arrive at Best Buy and they exhibited the same level of ghosting that the 2010 sets did which was poor, especially on Monster vs. Aliens.
post #45 of 60
I would stay away from lower-end LED displays if you are picky and would like to have a realistic looking picture with even backlighting. I'll explain why below, using first-hand experience. High-end Sony's are probably better, but stay away from the cheaper stuff.

My new Samsung PN59D6500 is more than bright enough, even on its Cinema setting for viewing with all the lights on in the room. The anti-glare screen is a big step up from my LG 60PK550 that I had. That LG had some nasty glare! Lots of folks are complaining about the True-Black-Filter peeling away from the inside of the panels on the D7000/D8000 series Samsungs, so that is part of the reason I stuck with the D6500 series.

70% of my use with my TV is for gaming, and image retention is a thing of the past with the 2011 Samsung Plasma's. My 2010 LG had an issue with image rentention where I would see faint, leftover images of the lighter content that had been on screen for a while whenever the picture went to an all black screen. I never experienced any burn-in, but image retention was clearly an issue. Now, even though my new TV is less than a week out of the box, the Samsung hasn't shown any signs of this. I'm super impressed with it... and oh gosh the blacks...

I tried the 55' LG passive 3D LED out and the local dimming just did not even compare at all to my LG PK550 plasma. I could see the lighter spots during dark scenes or when transitioning to a new movie trailer, etc. Side angle viewing was also atrocious. I'm extremely picky though... probably more so than most would be. The passive 3D was really neat, and I liked it for movies, but for games it was a definite hit to the resolution.

I don't have much to say about DLP. I imagine they are amazing for 3D with zero ghosting issues. I don't know anything about the new models, but I know the older ones from just a few years ago only look good if you are directly in front of them. I honestly think Plasma are the best all around displays for the most realistic looking picture.
post #46 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piker84 View Post

I would stay away from lower-end LED displays if you are picky and would like to have a realistic looking picture with even backlighting. I'll explain why below, using first-hand experience. High-end Sony's are probably better, but stay away from the cheaper stuff.

My new Samsung PN59D6500 is more than bright enough, even on its Cinema setting for viewing with all the lights on in the room. The anti-glare screen is a big step up from my LG 60PK550 that I had. That LG had some nasty glare! Lots of folks are complaining about the True-Black-Filter peeling away from the inside of the panels on the D7000/D8000 series Samsungs, so that is part of the reason I stuck with the D6500 series.

70% of my use with my TV is for gaming, and image retention is a thing of the past with the 2011 Samsung Plasma's. My 2010 LG had an issue with image rentention where I would see faint, leftover images of the lighter content that had been on screen for a while whenever the picture went to an all black screen. I never experienced any burn-in, but image retention was clearly an issue. Now, even though my new TV is less than a week out of the box, the Samsung hasn't shown any signs of this. I'm super impressed with it... and oh gosh the blacks...

I tried the 55' LG passive 3D LED out and the local dimming just did not even compare at all to my LG PK550 plasma. I could see the lighter spots during dark scenes or when transitioning to a new movie trailer, etc. Side angle viewing was also atrocious. I'm extremely picky though... probably more so than most would be. The passive 3D was really neat, and I liked it for movies, but for games it was a definite hit to the resolution.

I don't have much to say about DLP. I imagine they are amazing for 3D with zero ghosting issues. I don't know anything about the new models, but I know the older ones from just a few years ago only look good if you are directly in front of them. I honestly think Plasma are the best all around displays for the most realistic looking picture.

Just curious, what prompted you to replace the 60" plasma with a 59" plasma?
post #47 of 60
I have decided to go with a 51" Samsung 3D Plasma, but which one?:

D550 at $900
D6500 at $1000
D7000 at $1300 (with Real Black Filter)
D8000 at $1600 (with Real Black Filter and Local Contrast Enhancer)

I already have AppleTV, so I don't need the web browsing capablitity. So the question is this: "is it worth the extra money for the Real Black Filter and/or the Local Contrast Enhancer?" Anybody compare these features?

I will mostly watch sports, movies and hdtv shows on Direct TV HD receiver.

Thank you.
post #48 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augerhandle View Post

Don't forget 3D DLP. No ghosting at all, and lots bigger for less money. Bigger is better in 3D.

http://www.mitsubishi-tv.com/theater.html

Depends on what's bigger. Yes bigger screen size is better but DLPs are also much Bulkier taking up much more space and very heavy.

I would rather have the big screen size of a Plasma and be able to occupy as little space as possible.
post #49 of 60
Thread Starter 
The Sony 46NX810 was fair in my opinion. The picture and menu were good although the Netflix app did not have a search feature. The set could not play .mkv files and the 3d emitter addition with mounting was a bit extra too.

The 55in Samsung UN55D7000 series that my friend has is impressive but once again the size is still a factor for me, although the app menu is the best I've seen. The Samsung can play .mkv files which the Sony can't along with the built in browser and bluetooth 3d glasses.

Im selling the Sony and going for a larger screen and probably non LED.

60in plasma or a larger DLP.
I really like the off angle and rich color with the plasma tv's. The Samsung
PN59D8000 59-Inch and Panasonic VT30's are my considerations.

As far as the DLP's go you really cant beat the size and no crosstalk and I can go with a 73in or larger.

What do you guys think about a 3d front projector. I have been looking at
a crappy projector in a training session that I'm currently in and I'm sure that a quality front projector would look good with controlled lighting.
The usage would be about 3hrs per day and 6-8hrs on a Sunday.

So now that SIZE matters 60in plasma for the off angles, DLP for the size or
a 1,500 3d front projector?
(cause that's all I'm going to spend on one and maybe I can find a deal for a more expensive one for that price)

What are your thoughts?
post #50 of 60
Same thing. Panny TC-P65VT30 vs Sammy PN64D8000F. Which one to get.
post #51 of 60
After a lot of research I went vt30
post #52 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Javy3 View Post

Depends on what's bigger. Yes bigger screen size is better but DLPs are also much Bulkier taking up much more space and very heavy.

I would rather have the big screen size of a Plasma and be able to occupy as little space as possible.

DLP's are actually very light, lighter than a plasma or LCD of the same screen size. They will take up the entire top of the TV stand, instead of only a sliver of the TV stand, but I can't think of anything else I'd want to put in front of the TV to use that extra space on the TV stand. Also, a DLP will have the screen at the front of the TV stand, closer to the viewer. If you have a super skinny LCD, I would think it would look odd having it at the front of a TV stand, so most people would probably have it pushed towards the back of a TV stand, or even worse, wall-mounted, which places it further from the viewer, give you a smaller effective screen-size. This is an issue considering most people already have their couches way too far away for the size TV they have. If your couch is 10 feet away from the TV, then the THX recommended screen size would be 90 inches. If you wall-mount and effectively move the screen back another foot, or 10%, then you would need to have a 10% bigger TV (99 inches), to have the same field-of-view, or same feeling of size. Typically I seem to read about people whose seating is 12' away or more, and they only have a 50" TV or so to begin with (which likely cost more than a 73" DLP), then they exacerbate the problem by wall-mounting it. These are the people who can't say they can't see any difference between a Blu-ray and an upconverted DVD. Of course they can't, they're too far away to even perceive the difference in resolution (assuming 20/20 vision).
post #53 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgarrison1 View Post

The Sony 46NX810 was fair in my opinion. The picture and menu were good although the Netflix app did not have a search feature. The set could not play .mkv files and the 3d emitter addition with mounting was a bit extra too.

The 55in Samsung UN55D7000 series that my friend has is impressive but once again the size is still a factor for me, although the app menu is the best I've seen. The Samsung can play .mkv files which the Sony can't along with the built in browser and bluetooth 3d glasses.

Im selling the Sony and going for a larger screen and probably non LED.

60in plasma or a larger DLP.
I really like the off angle and rich color with the plasma tv's. The Samsung
PN59D8000 59-Inch and Panasonic VT30's are my considerations.

As far as the DLP's go you really cant beat the size and no crosstalk and I can go with a 73in or larger.

What do you guys think about a 3d front projector. I have been looking at
a crappy projector in a training session that I'm currently in and I'm sure that a quality front projector would look good with controlled lighting.
The usage would be about 3hrs per day and 6-8hrs on a Sunday.

So now that SIZE matters 60in plasma for the off angles, DLP for the size or
a 1,500 3d front projector?
(cause that's all I'm going to spend on one and maybe I can find a deal for a more expensive one for that price)

What are your thoughts?

I almost went front projector and I'm glad I didn't. Unless you plan on having the room completely dark all the time, well during viewing, a DLP is the way to go. Some front projectors may be bright enough to throw a decent picture with some ambient light, but if you want to see the best possible black levels you can achieve with a projector, put the lights at what you think will be your normal viewing levels, or the highest level you would like acceptable performance for, and look at a white wall, that's how black your blacks will be. For any projector, the best black levels it can possibly attain will be when it's off. Disclaimer: There are some black screens available now that do a better job of reproducing blacks in ambient light, but the screens alone cost more than the TV's we're discussing, which wouldn't leave much in the OP's budget for the projector...
post #54 of 60
Thread Starter 
It seems like more people lean toward the DLP. I recently viewed a 4 year old Samsung DLP with one bulb replacement and the HD picture IMO was on par with the plasmas and led's. I think that most people remember the older DLP's and are fixed on that and like the sleek look of a wall mounted thin tv.

The DLP image is huge and like stated above the wall mount shrinks the screen size and changes the trajectory for the worse.
All things considering the DLP's, speaking of the Mitsubishi's keep changing the technology in a way that makes you not want to buy last years model. DLP/ Diamond series/ LED/ Laser... Any recomendation on what type of 3D DLP to get budgeting around $1600?
post #55 of 60
This decision is actually very simple.

If 3D is a priority:

* Avoid LCD/LED LCD
* Buy Plasma if you *need* a flatpanel
* Buy DLP if you don't need a flatpanel, because it has zero crosstalk, excellent PQ, no IR, and much bigger screen for the money.

For $1600 you can nearly afford an 82" Mitsu DLP, or you can buy a 73" and have some money leftover for another project.
post #56 of 60
No doubt Plasma displays have their own advantages but you can't ignore the disadvantages they come with. Image burn out and heavy power requirements are the ones I would like to mention here. Their bulkiness is another thing but let us keep it out of the context here.

Image quality on Plasma is stunning but off late LED displays are on their way to replace Plasma in many respects including image quality. I think considering pros and cons of both technologies 3D LED TV would be better.
post #57 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgarrison1 View Post

Ok, switched the plan...got a great deal on a Sony KDL 46NX810 FOR $750 I'm sure it will work well with the ps3 too.

where did you go to get this at this price?
post #58 of 60
I've had a plasma ever since they came in the business. If this was 2011, I would recommend you a Panasonic VT30 65 inch right now. Its 2012 and I would say the LED TVs that were once looked so down upon are starting to make its footprint. The LG LM9600 and the LG OLED TV have definitely caught my eye. (Samsung ES8000 is edge-lit so me no like).

As far as 3D, panasonic plasma is good but IMO i've seen better 3D on a LG 47LW6500 and a sharp LED (can't remember which model).
post #59 of 60
Thread Starter 
I ended up going with a samsung 3d plasma in Sept and im pleased with it. Not worried about burning as I have left it on numerous times but pixel shifting and power save prevents any chance of burn. The movies and games from off angles Imo beats the led displays but led's are not far behind. My friend has the samsung 7500 and I must say it comes close but no cigar.! I feel as though 3d looks better on the led mainly due to backlighting and the blacks look a lot better on the newer led's now too. The micro dimming works great. Price wise I will probably upgrade to a 65 plasma 3d but mainly due to price. Apple has the lock on the retina display which is 2x the resolution of the 1080 displays and I believe they will be jumpimg in the tv game soon atleast thats what the rumors are. Technology is moving in the led direction but for my pockets and how movies and motion move I will stick with plasma. When you are not looking directly at the led display the black levels fade out a bit on off angles whereas plasma displays stay consistent- but the picture still looks great..looking at the local weather women and I dont have any real complaints about the new led displays...
Edited by mgarrison1 - 3/23/13 at 11:30pm
post #60 of 60
Thread Starter 
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