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The "Bacon Race" Theater / Patio / Bar Project - Page 68

post #2011 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by snickers1 View Post

oh wow he has grown since i saw him , his ears came out great is he the one we heard crying when his sibling was rough housing smile.gif

No, that's his brother, Brutus. He whines and cries about a lot of things.
post #2012 of 2309
Quote:
Originally Posted by damelon View Post

No, that's his brother, Brutus. He whines and cries about a lot of things.

he obviously is living up to his name tongue.gif
post #2013 of 2309
He's a big boy! Is he a big baby? Every Dobbie I've ever known has been a big baby...leaning on my leg, sitting on my feet, following me everywhere.....
post #2014 of 2309
Damelon, do you know the spacing between your can lights by chance? If aligning them with your columns/between columns was not an issue, would you change the spacing?
post #2015 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlogan6797 View Post

He's a big boy! Is he a big baby? Every Dobbie I've ever known has been a big baby...leaning on my leg, sitting on my feet, following me everywhere.....

Brutus is a very big baby. Caesar is a lot more independent. Dobermans in general are very attached to their owners, so they like to be around them at all times. That, and their typical look are what sort of classifies them as a good "guard dog". Stay near the boss and look scary! I used to joke with my wife because when I first met her she had a big black Dobie named Demon. Everyone who didn't know him was scared of him. Everyone who did know him thought his name was a form of ironic humor. He was the same as you mention. A leaner, sits on feat, head on lap, always next to you. They are both spoiled so of course those habits are only encouraged.
post #2016 of 2309
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

The room has the 15 mini recessed lights, rope light, and step lights, The pictures you see are taken with those light sources. That is all that Damelon has planned for the room and you can see it is plenty.


The lights are about 51 inches apart on the sides. 43.5 apart along the back wall


Over the screen they are 32.5 inches center to center.
post #2017 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

Damelon, do you know the spacing between your can lights by chance? If aligning them with your columns/between columns was not an issue, would you change the spacing?

The spacing was pretty much determined by the layout of the room. I don't think I would change the spacing at all. If you really needed more light, the location of that light is more of the issue than the spacing between the lights. Since all of the lights have to be in the tray, there are no sources of direct light. For "theater" activities, the lighting is perfect. If you need to do work in the room, or wanted to read, you would want standard lighting also, which probably means cans. Total light aside, I think the spacing of the lights to highlight the columns and the panels turned out exactly the way I wanted it, and it does bring the eye to the details of the room.

I've mentioned before though that if I were to do it again today, I might consider some smaller LED lights, and also use a lot more "LED Tape light" for additional lighting in the light tray (upwards) and along the baseboard and/or risers. I am quite amazed by the amount of light that tiny LED tape under the bar outside puts out for something so small.
post #2018 of 2309
Thread Starter 
By the way, I'd like to give a personal thank you to WarrenP for using my theater as the "Cover Picture" in his home theater book! It was a nice surprise!

http://avscience.com/ - Main Page of AVSCIENCE!


http://avscience.com/2013/07/the-ultimate-course-on-home-theater/
post #2019 of 2309
@ Spaceman - Thanks (I'm a little embarrassed that I didn't find that)

@ damelon - Thanks, and congrats!
post #2020 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Got my tweeters already! Actually, they arrived two days ago but I'm lazy.

I think I want to figure out how to get my room measured. (Room EQ Wizard?) That way I can test it with both the Paradigm and Axiom fronts. I also want to determine if I would benefit from swapping out my speakers or my subs. I still think that I have 1 or 2 Seaton Submersives in my future. I've just spent a lot of money lately so.... Plus a bigger problem is that selling my existing subs will be difficult. They are big and heavy, shipping would not be an easy thing at all, so I might have to sell them locally, which would be quite difficult.

Funny how the treated room completely changes subs. They were completely overwhelming in my other room. (I had nothing but a few panels) I know that normally I would move them around and find the best placement, but since my room is done already, I want to keep them on the front wall, which means something front firing with more DB, like a Submersive F2 might be the way to go.
post #2021 of 2309
Thread Starter 
I was contacted from someone who might be interested in buying my two Axiom subs if I choose to upgrade, so I sent an email to Seton Sound today discussing sub options!

Who knows, there may be one or two Submersives in my future! New expenses are always easier to deal with if you know you can get some money from your previous purchases. wink.gif
post #2022 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Speaker Repair Day! - Opened up my box from Axiom and emptied out my two tweeters. For some reason I never expected a tweeter to be heavy like a driver. The brain is odd sometimes!

So the first thing I did was remove the old tweeters. All I needed was a HEX wrench. The speaker connection terminals just pulled off easily.


Then I just plugged in the new ones and we're done!
post #2023 of 2309
But you never said if it was the tweeters or the crossovers...listening impressions?
post #2024 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin g. View Post

But you never said if it was the tweeters or the crossovers...listening impressions?

It was the tweeters. I brought them into my office after replacing them (The whole replacement maybe took 3 minutes total) and plugged them into my outdoor receiver since it was easy to hook them out and put out a test tone. They were outputting sound through the tweeters now so that was the solution. I haven't replaced the speakers in my theater yet. I am looking into measuring my room and since the Paradigm speakers are already in place and configured I'd like to start with those before moving everything around.

I've heard these speakers before they were broken, the only thing that was obvious was that the Axioms have a lot more high freq than the Paradigms, but I think the Paradigms have more low freq. That might not matter so much though if I end up putting some SubMersives in the room! So I do want to measure so I can see for sure how they vary in my space.
post #2025 of 2309
Thread Starter 
So I spent a good 40 minutes or so this morning talking with Mark Seaton and I have concluded that I am absolutely horrible at reading posts here on AVS. smile.gif I have read numerous threads on Audessey and speaker setup, but about 3 out of 4 important topics are either things I skimmed over or things that my small brain just didn't absorb. Discussing all of the products he has and the current wait times aside, I think my number one priority now comes down to figuring out what my room and my current system can do, and how to calibrate it. I really had no idea what I was doing beyond hitting the enter button on Audessey.

So the first thing I did after hanging up the phone was do order a UMIK from minidsp (The Dayton OmniMic was sold out at partsexpress) with the intention of setting up and measuring my room using Room EQ Wizard. Mark discussed this with me and this mic has its own calibration files and with my HTPC already integrated into my theater, running this should be relatively painless. It's funny that after almost 2 years of watching movies in my theater, I am going to finally get around to posting some good Curve graphs and setting up my theater for improved success. I can't wait to see what the results will be, being as people who have sat in my theater have already told me how amazing they thought it was, and it was never even set up right.

After that here are the things Mark suggested to me, as well as personal priorities:
1) All I did was plug in my speakers and run Audessey. Afterwords, with the bass lacking, I increased the gains from -6 back to 0 on the subs, that is it. Mark told me that one reason I may be lacking bass is because Audessey usually configures the crossovers wrong. He suggested that post-Audessey I try setting all of my crossovers to 80 and re-listening to my system. (It was suggested to also set my sub here, as many studios do, though the default tends to be 120) This may make a dramatic improvement in my room just by itself. So I will go through a few scenes and see how it sounds different.
2) Make sure the distances for my two subs (Both on either side of my center channel) are set the same.
3) Try using Audessey calibration using only positions around the front row of my theater, and not the rear. Sometimes rear seating can receive more bass and thus downgrade the bass response for all seating locations.
4) With Audessey Off, measure the room as-is.
5) Same as above, with the Axiom M80 fronts vs the Paradigm Sudio 100s.
6) Same as above, with one sub in the rear left corner.
7) Same as above, with one sub behind the rear row between the columns (Note: My subs wont fit here, but a SubMersive F2 will fit there, so this is just to determine what the optimal speaker location could be in my room)

My mic will hopefully arrive by Friday, and if so, I will be doing all of these things on Saturday or Sunday this weekend.

If anyone here lives in the area, and is free to do some listening tests, a second or third set of ears might be helpful. Let me know if you are interested. First dibs go to Snickers and/or BIG since you have both been over before.

Based on the results, I will determine what subs I am buying. I have already talked with Mark and know what my options are, so there will be some speaker changes in my future!
post #2026 of 2309
Quote:
Originally Posted by damelon View Post

So I spent a good 40 minutes or so this morning talking with Mark Seaton and I have concluded that I am absolutely horrible at reading posts here on AVS. smile.gif I have read numerous threads on Audessey and speaker setup, but about 3 out of 4 important topics are either things I skimmed over or things that my small brain just didn't absorb. Discussing all of the products he has and the current wait times aside, I think my number one priority now comes down to figuring out what my room and my current system can do, and how to calibrate it. I really had no idea what I was doing beyond hitting the enter button on Audessey.

So the first thing I did after hanging up the phone was do order a UMIK from minidsp (The Dayton OmniMic was sold out at partsexpress) with the intention of setting up and measuring my room using Room EQ Wizard. Mark discussed this with me and this mic has its own calibration files and with my HTPC already integrated into my theater, running this should be relatively painless. It's funny that after almost 2 years of watching movies in my theater, I am going to finally get around to posting some good Curve graphs and setting up my theater for improved success. I can't wait to see what the results will be, being as people who have sat in my theater have already told me how amazing they thought it was, and it was never even set up right.

After that here are the things Mark suggested to me, as well as personal priorities:
1) All I did was plug in my speakers and run Audessey. Afterwords, with the bass lacking, I increased the gains from -6 back to 0 on the subs, that is it. Mark told me that one reason I may be lacking bass is because Audessey usually configures the crossovers wrong. He suggested that post-Audessey I try setting all of my crossovers to 80 and re-listening to my system. (It was suggested to also set my sub here, as many studios do, though the default tends to be 120) This may make a dramatic improvement in my room just by itself. So I will go through a few scenes and see how it sounds different.
2) Make sure the distances for my two subs (Both on either side of my center channel) are set the same.
3) Try using Audessey calibration using only positions around the front row of my theater, and not the rear. Sometimes rear seating can receive more bass and thus downgrade the bass response for all seating locations.
4) With Audessey Off, measure the room as-is.
5) Same as above, with the Axiom M80 fronts vs the Paradigm Sudio 100s.
6) Same as above, with one sub in the rear left corner.
7) Same as above, with one sub behind the rear row between the columns (Note: My subs wont fit here, but a SubMersive F2 will fit there, so this is just to determine what the optimal speaker location could be in my room)

My mic will hopefully arrive by Friday, and if so, I will be doing all of these things on Saturday or Sunday this weekend.

If anyone here lives in the area, and is free to do some listening tests, a second or third set of ears might be helpful. Let me know if you are interested. First dibs go to Snickers and/or BIG since you have both been over before.

Based on the results, I will determine what subs I am buying. I have already talked with Mark and know what my options are, so there will be some speaker changes in my future!
I've just received the OmniMic and started to do some measurement myself this past weekend too.

Good luck. smile.gif
post #2027 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by landshark1 View Post

I've just received the OmniMic and started to do some measurement myself this past weekend too.

Good luck. smile.gif

Yeah I'm sure it will be a fun (sarcasm) process! I am excited to finally measure the room and post some graphs though!
post #2028 of 2309
REW always scares me. Some day I need to just get a decent mic and try it.
post #2029 of 2309
BIG, get in your way back machine...I am a visual learner and am half way there, but I have a table saw and a miter saw, but not a saw like in this picture....can I still make a similar guide/stop to cut wood for my frames, if so, how? I have a pile of wood that has been in my basement, well, roughly since winter of when you first posted this. Time to get it done.

post #2030 of 2309
Yes, you need to figure out how to anchor the miter saw and to anchor a stop at the desired distance from the blade. Both need to be fixed relative to each other. I have a miter saw stand that does all this for me on the road. (Rigid).
post #2031 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by damelon View Post

Yeah I'm sure it will be a fun (sarcasm) process! I am excited to finally measure the room and post some graphs though!

No measurements yet of course, but just changing the crossovers all to 80 made a huge difference. I re-watched just "The Pod Scene" from War of the Worlds and it was very different than the last time I tried it. On top of that we watched another movie tonight configured that way and I had to turn the volume down. Needless to say at least I know it isn't my room that is deadening the Bass, and my subs seemed to recover a lot of that lost power I used to have in my other room.
post #2032 of 2309
You have some canceling effect ?
post #2033 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

You have some canceling effect ?

I won't know until I run the measurements, but I don't think so. The issue from what I understand it is just how Audessey works. It calculates the distances, EQ, crossovers, Delay, etc. (Or it makes calculations on those things based on some things the AVR tells it) I'm sure I'm going to butcher this explanation somehow, but from what Mark Seaton discussed with me, there are things Audessey does very well, and things it doesn't. Especially in XT32, Audessey does an excellent job of implementing a good EQ without the need of manual calbiration but it doesn't do a good job of crossovers... that is to say, the AVR doesn't make a good decision of what should go to your sub and what shouldn't. BrolicBeast, who owns a pare of SubMersive F2s said himself that when he hooked them up and ran Audessey, his first thought afterwords was that he might have wasted his money. This had nothing to do with the subs, which are incredible, but everything to do with the AVR and how Audysset set the crossovers and LFE levels. Adjusting those slightly made a night and day difference and his subs came alive! Audyssey in combination with the AVR measure individual speakers, so the AVR determines my mains might be able to handle frequencies down to 40/50Hz with no problem, however that means that the LFE filters are not handling anything below that range, so raising those crossovers moves information in that range to the MultEQ filters, which are very good, and to your sub, which probably plays those frequencies better than your speaker anyway. Besides, anything 80Hz and below usually is more of an Omni-directional signal, meaning that the waves are too long for your ear to be able to determine where they come from, so the fact that they come from a specific speaker is sort of irrelevant unless the speaker can play that frequency better than the sub.

The two things that Audyssey did on my system was :

1) Set the Bass Gain levels way too low, given the crossover settings. (This might not be necessary to change if you change the settings in #2, as it results in a lot more bass!)

2) Set the cross overs as if I had no sub at all. Most of my speakers were set at the 40-50 range as far as crossovers, including my rears. On top of that, it set my LFE filter to 120Hz, but it should always be this since that is what information on the LFE track is mastered to. Yes, most of the Big Bass notes we often talk about tend to be in the 20Hz range, but these crossover settings were preventing the subs from receiving a lot of the signals which make a sub come alive. 80Hz is the THX standard regardless of size, but changing those crossovers will impact your entire sound stage. 80 might not be perfect, but it showed me right away that the settings were the primary factor in my lack of bass in the room. I could maybe take the front speakers a bit lower due to their listed capabilities, but it would take some tweaking. Basically, even if the speakers could play the frequencies below 80 well, they don't need to. The load would be removed from all of those speakers and placed upon the sub instead.

See Chris Kyriakakis' (Audessey) thoughts on the "Small/Large" blog on the issue: He basically states, "If you have a subwoofer, all of your speakers are Small"
http://www.audyssey.com/blog/2009/05/small-vs-large/

He (Chris) was also asked the same question on the "Subwoofer setup and MultEQ" FAQ on the Audyssey page. Question "Audyssey set my mains/center to 40Hz and my surrounds to 60Hz, I have in the past changed these to 80, in your opinion, is this correct?" And Chris responded, "It's OK to move the crossovers higher. This sends more content to the subwoofer MultEQ filters that have higher resolution." he also stated in his 101 page, "Sending more content to the sub is a good thing if you have MultEQ or MultEQ XT because the filter resolution in the sub channel is 8x higher."

If you've ever tried to read the entire Audessey thread, you will get a lot of contradictory statements. Some people say exactly that, no matter what set all of your speakers to "Small" and have 80Hz crossovers. Others say with XT32 you should just calibrate your system and use it as-is. This is "What reference bass should be". I think the answer is somewhere in between. I do agree that the bass is much more tight and controlled without adjustments in the pure-Audessey config, but it also has no "Impact". The "All 80" setup had a LOT more bass. A lot more rumble.

I'll tell you right now, these Axiom subs were rated well, but they only have 1/4 of the amp that a SubMersive has. If I did the same EQ settings with two of those in my room, I'd probably take my panels off of my walls unless I did some serious -db settings!

Another thing that Mark mentioned to me in regards to my sub positioning was that I should be using them as one sub. He stated that there was little to no benefit of running each sub independently when they are on either side of the center channel, since the room would respond to them almost identically. In fact, it could actually cause problems in things like delay because they are so close and Audessey isn't perfect. He recommended that any two subs that I run in those locations should use a Y connection, or a daisy-chain from one to the other, to threat them as a single sub that gets the same signal. The multiple sub-outs was primarily designed for configurations like one on each side of the room or a sub on the front and a sub in the rear.
Edited by damelon - 7/31/13 at 8:06am
post #2034 of 2309
I am in the same boat with dual subs up front. I just added my second sub (a DIY virtually duplicate of my SVS sub) and I keep wondering the proper way to run Audyssey with them. I did the calibration with setting both subs, independantly, to the "75dB" number at the very beginning of the Audyssey steps, and then I used a Y-cable to hook them both up together (which combined went to something like 82dB) but left them set where they were and then ran the calibration. Not sure if that it right or wrong, if I should set the "75dB" level for when both are connected (instead of the two 75dB levels combining to be 82dB or whatever).

My receiver has 2 sub outs, but I am using the 2nd to send LFE signals to my bass shakers, and the 2nd output is just a mirror of the first anyway (not independant).

I am going to run another calibration tonight just to mess around a little.

Oh, and I totally agree with the mind-set of 80Hz. My Axioms get set to 40Hz and 60Hz depending on the speaker, and I like the way it sounds for stereo, but not home theater. Since I rarely ever listen to music, I bump them up to 80 Hz and like it a lot more.

Note: I read once that if you bump the speakers up to 80Hz from say 60hz where Audyssey set them, you lose the calibration data between 60Hz and 80Hz at the exact moment that you change it. The only way to get Audyssey calibrated sound lower than the new 80Hz setting that was changed is to rerun the calibration.

So you can go higher in the crossover fine, but going lower doesn't "work" in that the difference between the current setting and something lower isn't Audyssey calibrated.
post #2035 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickbuol View Post

I am in the same boat with dual subs up front. I just added my second sub (a DIY virtually duplicate of my SVS sub) and I keep wondering the proper way to run Audyssey with them. I did the calibration with setting both subs, independantly, to the "75dB" number at the very beginning of the Audyssey steps, and then I used a Y-cable to hook them both up together (which combined went to something like 82dB) but left them set where they were and then ran the calibration. Not sure if that it right or wrong, if I should set the "75dB" level for when both are connected (instead of the two 75dB levels combining to be 82dB or whatever).

My receiver has 2 sub outs, but I am using the 2nd to send LFE signals to my bass shakers, and the 2nd output is just a mirror of the first anyway (not independant).

I am going to run another calibration tonight just to mess around a little.

Oh, and I totally agree with the mind-set of 80Hz. My Axioms get set to 40Hz and 60Hz depending on the speaker, and I like the way it sounds for stereo, but not home theater. Since I rarely ever listen to music, I bump them up to 80 Hz and like it a lot more.

Note: I read once that if you bump the speakers up to 80Hz from say 60hz where Audyssey set them, you lose the calibration data between 60Hz and 80Hz at the exact moment that you change it. The only way to get Audyssey calibrated sound lower than the new 80Hz setting that was changed is to rerun the calibration.

So you can go higher in the crossover fine, but going lower doesn't "work" in that the difference between the current setting and something lower isn't Audyssey calibrated.

So the "Y" Cable argument vs Sub1 / Sub2 is totally receiver dependent. I spent quite a bit of time this morning reading Chris's Audyssey 101 articles and his Q&A with several people. He makes the statement that unless your AVR has the correct Sub EQ HT processing to support 2 subs. Before running Audyssey, you want to make sure to turn off any EQ your sub has built in, set phase to 0, set any filter knobs your sub might have to the highest setting possible, and set your volume knob to around 75db as stated. As long as your aren't hitting min or max gain on your AVR afterwords, then he says there is no difference between adjusting the volume knob on the sub to changing the +/- in the AVR to reach a mentally-pleasing 0. It's just to try to get your volume within the range that the AVR can set it to reference. If you are using a Y-Connector between two subs, you need to make sure everything is set the exact same on both subs, since ultimately they are acting as a single sub.

As far as the crossover settings, the way he states it is that the filters Audyssey uses are much better for the Sub. In almost all cases, your main speakers are considered "Small" regardless, and it is a good thing to raise your crossovers from places like 40, 50, 60 to 80 and let those filters take over. Doing so might mean you have a lot more bass, so you might need to change the gain levels for your subs by doing that. (I changed my gain from around -6/-5 or so to 0 on both subs, and then set the crossovers to 80, to be honest, I might want to try it back the way it was gain wise with the new crossover settings. Chris also stated that changing the gains after the fact do throw off the calibration of Dynamic EQ since they were all set to compliment each other in a reference setting, but it isn't Audyssey that sets the crossovers, it is the AVR itself. The crossovers only determine when to cut off from your speakers and this does not mess up the calibration, as you said, as long as you don't LOWER it from what is detected.

He also states that the Low Pass Filter (Or LFE Crossover itself) should ALWAYS be 120hz.

As far as your music vs home theater, there are usually multiple Audyssey EQ modes. I've seen in multiple places that the EQ Mode titled "Audyssey" is suited for home theater, and most music is better suited to be in the "Flat" mode.
Edited by damelon - 7/31/13 at 11:16am
post #2036 of 2309
Thread Starter 
By the way there is a possibility my Mic won't get to me by the weekend. I'll keep you all posted when I get it.
post #2037 of 2309
Quote:
Originally Posted by damelon View Post

The crossovers only determine when to cut off from your speakers and this does not mess up the calibration, as you said, as long as you don't LOWER it from what is detected.

He also states that the Low Pass Filter (Or LFE Crossover itself) should ALWAYS be 120hz..

Hi damelon,

It was nice to chat the other day, and it appears the tips did help greatly with the function of the system. Those are important steps to get sorted before you make any upgrades.

I wanted to confirm that as you posted, there is no problem in raising the crossover frequencies set by the receiver during Audyssey calibration. The suggestions of what happens when you lower the crossover are overstated. It is correct that Audyssey will not have applied correction below the crossover, but for a change of ~20Hz, this is a very minor concern. The Subwoofer is always smoothed to 120Hz as they need to do this for the LFE channel which only goes to the subwoofer, so the subwoofer is always smoothed higher than the speaker crossovers.

As for the LFE low pass, this only applies to the .1 effects channel and has no bearing on the crossover interaction with the main speakers. Both myself and Roger Dressler have posted elsewhere as to why the theoretically preferred 120Hz setting is more a suggestion than a rule, and often the system sounds little better with an 80-100Hz setting. Feel free to experiment and set it where you prefer.
post #2038 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Seaton View Post

Hi damelon,

It was nice to chat the other day, and it appears the tips did help greatly with the function of the system. Those are important steps to get sorted before you make any upgrades.

I wanted to confirm that as you posted, there is no problem in raising the crossover frequencies set by the receiver during Audyssey calibration. The suggestions of what happens when you lower the crossover are overstated. It is correct that Audyssey will not have applied correction below the crossover, but for a change of ~20Hz, this is a very minor concern. The Subwoofer is always smoothed to 120Hz as they need to do this for the LFE channel which only goes to the subwoofer, so the subwoofer is always smoothed higher than the speaker crossovers.

As for the LFE low pass, this only applies to the .1 effects channel and has no bearing on the crossover interaction with the main speakers. Both myself and Roger Dressler have posted elsewhere as to why the theoretically preferred 120Hz setting is more a suggestion than a rule, and often the system sounds little better with an 80-100Hz setting. Feel free to experiment and set it where you prefer.

Mark, Thanks for the reply! Yeah, I had read those things as well. (lowering by 20hz and the LFE track) I don'y think I specified the LFE track is the only case this place. Would't apply to normal 2 channel stuff.

I'm very excited about your new product!

I'm hoping I can get my mic by the weekend and get some second opinions from a few other people here.
post #2039 of 2309
Thread Starter 
Unfortunately, miniDSP mics come from Hong Kong, so I didn't get my mic by the weekend. It did arrive in the US on Friday though, so I will very likely have it in a day or two. As a result of course, I was not able to do any measurements this weekend.

On a personal note, after years of owning a PS3, I finally decided to purchase my first game for it. (I was originally using it for a blu ray player, and then after that, a MKV / Netflix client streamer) I sort of have a soft spot in my heart for human survival stories and I heard about this game called "The Last of Us", which got amazing reviews, mostly for immersion and story. So I spent all day Sunday playing it in my movie room, as the game also has a 7.1 audio track option. Well I have to say, they were right about the story... it is in a lot of ways more story than game, and it is a better written survival story/zombie story than almost every zombie movie I have seen to be honest. How a cheesy movie like I am Legend gets made, and a movie like this does not, I have no idea. Even the acting of the "Digitally Rendered" characters is better than most of the real actors I see... it does in a way have a "Walking Dead" feel to it, which is a show I also really like, without being over the top with its characters like a graphic novel tends to be. The gameplay itself is phenomenal for what it tries to do. You are constantly looking over your shoulder, and sneaking up on people tends to really get your blood going, especially if you don't really know what is behind you while you are doing it. In any case, it's not your typical game. People who look for a normal FPS won't like it. It's not really a puzzle game either. It's just a good thrill, and an excellent thrill to experience in a dark theater room with surround and subs! The sounds in the game are incredible!
post #2040 of 2309
TLOU is an amazing game. I played it a few weeks ago, and as cliche as it sounds, it's changed the way I look at video games. Most of the games that I've really enjoyed over the years feel almost juvenile, now. I'm currently playing through Bioshock Infinite, which is supposed to be a great game in its own right, but I'm having a hard time getting into it. TLOU certainly raised the bar for video gaming!
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