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"American Horror Story" on FX HD

post #1 of 486
Thread Starter 

Teasers:

http://tv.yahoo.com/show/47580/videos/26136944

http://tv.yahoo.com/show/47580/video...pOfHIBFwIpe9MF


Quote:


American Horror Story revolves around The Harmons, a family of three who move from Boston to Los Angeles as a means to reconcile past anguish. The All Star cast features Dylan McDermott (The Practice) as Ben Harmon, a psychiatrist; Connie Britton (Friday Night Lights) as Vivien Harmon, Ben's wife; Taissa Farmiga as Violet, the Harmon's teenage daughter; Jessica Lange (Tootsie, Blue Sky, Grey Gardens) in her first-ever regular series TV role as Constance, the Harmon's neighbor; Evan Peters (One Tree Hill) as Tate Langdon, one of Ben's patients; and Denis O'Hare (The Good Wife) as Larry Harvey. Guest stars for the series include Frances Conroy (Six Feet Under) and Alexandra Breckenridge (Dirt) as the Harmon's housekeepers; and Jamie Brewer as Constance's daughter.

American Horror Story, co-created by former Nip/Tuck executive producers and current Glee co-creators/executive producers Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, announced John Landgraf, President and General Manager, FX Networks. American Horror Story begins production in Los Angeles on July 27 and will premiere on FX in October.

We're thrilled to welcome Ryan and Brad back to their original home, said Landgraf. They have shown an uncanny ability to bring original series to the air unlike any that have come before, and to reconcile 'wildly entertaining' with the 'creatively ambitious.' Once again, American Horror Story is a wholly unique and original take on its genre with richly drawn characters. The ability to put together a cast of stars such as Dylan McDermott, Connie Britton, Denis O'Hare, Frances Conroy and OscarĀ®-winner Jessica Lange speaks to the quality of the writing and storytelling. This series is going to blow audiences back in their seats, and we can't wait to have it on our air.

The pilot episode of American Horror Story, shot in Los Angeles, was written by Murphy and Falchuk, and it was directed by Murphy. In addition to Murphy and Falchuk, Dante Di Loreto will also serve as Executive Producer of the series.

Early preview reactions:

NPR:
I'll have a final review closer to its October premiere, but they said they welcomed initial reactions, so let me say this: American Horror Story is emphatically not for everybody. It's a genre piece, it's very campy, and a significant number of critics in the theater with me didn't like it at all.

I, on the other hand, did.

It tells the story of the Harmon family: Vivien (Connie Britton) and Ben (Dylan McDermott) and their teenage daughter Violet (Taissa Farmiga). They've got plenty of family problems, but their newest one is that they have moved into a straight-up haunted house. And it's not pleasantly haunted by friendly ghosts that look like Casper, either. It's haunted by demon-y looking things, and it may possibly cause you to hallucinate, and it has a history of not just spooking but downright ... well, devouring the people who live in it.
http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2...eators-of-glee

TV Worth Watching:
Without question, it's THE new show of the fall TV season. It's so good, it's scary. And it's so scary, it's good...
American Horror Story, which launches Oct. 5 at 10 p.m. ET (make plans accordingly), is co-created by Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, the team behind FX's Nip/Tuck and Fox's Glee. Returning to their original roost, this new series is based upon the most familiar of horror plots: a family moves into a haunted house, and bad things happen.

But while the premise is conventional, and the knowing nods to everything from The Shining (with its aggressively sexy spectre, right) and Don't Look Now to The Amityville Horror are there for the finding, most of American Horror Story is breathtakingly bold and daringly different. For a basic cable series, it pushes limits, and redefines them, but without getting into gratuitous gore or needless nudity territory.
http://www.tvworthwatching.com/blog/...tory-get.shtml

Kansas City Star:
So let's acknowledge this: In an industry that has lately become risk-averse, where cable channels that a decade ago lived on a diet of reality and reruns are now burdened by the need to find scripted hits that remind viewers of their earlier scripted hits, American Horror Story is by far the most thought-provoking and arresting TV pilot of the fall season.

That's not to say it's going to be any good, and indeed as the screening went on in the Little Theatre on the Fox lot, I could hear titters and laughs tinged with derision, as though my peers had a sense that the wheels were already coming off. Again, past is prologue, and this is a Murphy production, just like Nip/Tuck, which started out so high concept and wound up a weird mutilation-titillation soap.

Perhaps some of the laughter I heard came from scenes that showed it to be so earnestly an homage to auteur-driven horror films like The Shining and Rosemary's Baby (Falchuk even told us it was an homage in his pre-screening comments). Or maybe it was just a nervous reaction to all the quick cuts and bizarre twists of fate, presented in a nonstop assault that went on for most of an hour.
Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2011/08/02...#ixzz1U5KBUJMR

LA Times:
Falchuck said movies like "The Exoricst" and "The Shining" served as inspiration for the series. The first day of shooting post-pilot began Tuesday.

So what can you expect? Jessica Lange drew laughs as a nosey neighbor with a Southern accent and something to hide. The title sequence is designed by Kyle Cooper, who did the landmark opening for "Se7en." And there are more than a few butt shots of Dylan McDermott. Oh, and a dude in a rubber suit.
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/show...or-story-.html


Hard to say how this show will go, but based on the intial reactions it's got me interested. If not just for the FX-brand, Connie Britton and the horror aspect but to see if this show really will push the boundaries of cable.

90 minute premiere: October 5th, 10pm
post #2 of 486
So given Murphy's history, we can expect the first season to be good and then he'll destroy it.
post #3 of 486
Very cool. Thanks for making the thread.
post #4 of 486
Quite a cast.

Yeah, one good season then it devolves into self caricature.
post #5 of 486
It's got Connie Britton, and after FNL I'm going to watch it just for her.
post #6 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyehill View Post

So given Murphy's history, we can expect the first season to be good and then he'll destroy it.

My thoughts as well. I stay away from Murphy run shows because of it. It is not worth the time investment.
post #7 of 486
I'm a fan of Ryan Murphy loved almost all the episodes of Nip/Tuck except the future dream episode. Really liked his directing and screenplay of the film Running with Scissors. Don't like the music of Glee and I knew it would be severely limited by American broadcast standards so I only watched a couple episodes of that series.

Really curious to see what he will do with the horror comedy genre.
post #8 of 486
Thread Starter 
Official YouTube channel is up and full of strange Twin-Peaksesque weirdness.



http://www.youtube.com/user/americanhorrorstory#p/u
post #9 of 486
Looking forward to this. Hasn't been a promising horror series on the small screen since the late, lamented "American Gothic".
post #10 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Looking forward to this. Hasn't been a promising horror series on the small screen since the late, lamented "American Gothic".

Supernatural. At least through season 5.
post #11 of 486
I'm also looking forward to this. FX is an awesome channel, I'm sure it will preform well.
post #12 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocoon View Post
Supernatural. At least through season 5.
I've never seen it.
post #13 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocoon View Post
Supernatural. At least through season 5.
Yep, still one of the best shows on TV. Even minus Kripke.
post #14 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocoon View Post

Supernatural. At least through season 5.

I would submit the second half of season 6 has also been pretty on the mark, too. The 1st half wasn't bad, just not up to the very excellent standards they previously had.

The thing is, "not up to snuff" for Supernatural is still far better than a lot of the best from other shows. They've managed to nail the horror genre, even as they mix in witty dialog with occasional sensational comedy moments. Despite that, it has always felt like the horror aspect was taken very seriously. Despite the light moments, they've never made the mistake of making it feel like they were poking fun at their bread and butter.

I would say that if American Horror Story even comes close to the level of Supernatural, it's going to be fantastic.

It starts with interesting characters that aren't full of themselves that the audience cares about. Then you follow up with great dialog and character interaction. Finally, you need good atmosphere. Get that right, and you can sell any premise.

The monsters are the easy part. Too often, the focus is on the scare and not enough on the story. Since the scare never pays off as well by itself, the tendency is to go with the "gore porn" route where it's all about the squirm factor - which isn't scary.
post #15 of 486
Thread Starter 


The more I see promos with "from the co-creators of Glee" the more disconcerting I find it.

It's like promoting a new factual documentary with "from the co-creators of Jersey Shore."
post #16 of 486
I'll give it a chance. But the name Ryan Murphy immediately gives me low expectations.

For whatever reason whenever I hear his name or see 'creator of Glee' I think of this:

post #17 of 486
Entertainment Weekly reviewed the pilot. Gave it a glowing B+.
post #18 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyehill View Post

I'll give it a chance. But the name Ryan Murphy immediately gives me low expectations.

Ryan Murphy shouldn't be given any work in television until he can show that he can create more than 9 episodes of something before running out of ideas.
post #19 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPanther95 View Post

Ryan Murphy shouldn't be given any work in television until he can show that he can create more than 9 episodes of something before running out of ideas.

If it follows most FX shows, it will be 13 episodes per season. So around end of November we'll all be throwing in the towel.
post #20 of 486
I'm looking forward to the premier.
post #21 of 486
I am too. It has the potential to be unique.
post #22 of 486
TV Review
FX's interesting 'American Horror Story' proves a bit confusing
By Rob Owen, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - October 2nd, 2011

Perhaps the most succinct, accurate review of "American Horror Story" is this one from a fellow TV critic after a screening this summer: "It's a hot mess."

This week's "American Horror Story" pilot is a nonsensical roller coaster ride that will confuse, astound and surprise viewers. You may not come away knowing whether you like it, but you won't be bored.

Written by "Glee" and "Nip/Tuck" executive producers Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, who clearly are tacking more toward their "Nip/Tuck" baser instincts with this program, "American Horror Story" offers an overstuffed introduction to a family that moves into a haunted, Victorian home in Los Angeles.

Vivien (Connie Britton, "Friday Night Lights") and Ben Harmon (Dylan McDermott, "The Practice") have been through some bad times. She had a miscarriage; he cheated. So they pull up stakes from their East Coast home and travel west with daughter Violet (Taissa Farmiga), who likes to cut herself. The family moves into a 1920s-era Los Angeles home that viewers have already seen in a flashback to 1978. The house appears to be haunted by an elderly baby wearing a muumuu.

Once there, Ben, a psychiatrist, begins seeing patients in his home office, including teenager Tate (Evan Peters), who has daydreams of shooting up his school. Potentially crazier characters begin popping up, including a man with half a face (Denis O'Hare, "True Blood") spotted lurking outside; and a maid who has worked in the house for years who appears older (Frances Conroy, "Six Feet Under") to Vivien and younger (Alexandra Brackenridge) to Ben.

The most entertaining interloper is neighbor Constance (Jessica Lange), a grand dame with Southern roots, who swans into the home chasing her developmentally disabled daughter, Adelaide (Jamie Brewer), who is fond of telling anyone living in the Harmon house, "You're going to die in there," which it appears they often do. The home's previous owners were a gay couple who died in a murder-suicide. (Pittsburgh native Zachary Quinto will play one half of the couple in upcoming episodes.)

Constance, who uncharitably refers to her daughter as "the mongoloid," constantly wanders into the Harmon house and sometimes turns threatening.

In addition to his writing duties, Mr. Murphy also directed the "AHS" pilot, which feels more like a succession of loosely-connected scenes than it does a whole story. At times, viewers don't know where they are - the first scene of Vivien in her East Coast home has no establishing shot and it comes after a flashback in the L.A. house. It's unclear if this lack of clarity is an intentional effort to confuse or just sloppy filmmaking.

Ms. Britton and Mr. McDermott get one particularly intense knock-down, drag-out fight scene in the pilot. The scene gives Ms. Britton an opportunity to show some new sides rather than her more grounded "Friday Night Lights" character. Mr. McDermott's scowling and yelling will be familiar to fans of "The Practice."

"American Horror Story" grows increasingly bizarre as it wears on - Did I mention Vivien finds a rubber gimp suit in the attic? - with many lingering shots of Mr. McDermott's bare backside as he wanders the house nude.

What's not clear from the pilot is if there's a compelling story underlying the show or if it's simply provocative for its own sake. This week's premiere raises many questions and at press time FX had no additional episodes available for review.

AMERICAN HORROR STORY
When: 10 p.m. Wednesday, FX.


http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11275/1178656-67-0.stm
post #23 of 486
Thread Starter 
I'm more excited to see this show than any others based on the reviews I've seen. Even if the show is terrible I just want to see how crazy it gets to warrant all the opposing views.
post #24 of 486
Thanks for the bump.

I'm looking forward to tonight's premier. I have SVU and CSI on at the same time. Not sure which show to watch live. Thinking I'll pick American Horror Story, so they can get the ratings.
post #25 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young C View Post

Thanks for the bump.

I'm looking forward to tonight's premier. I have SVU and CSI on at the same time. Not sure which show to watch live. Thinking I'll pick American Horror Story, so they can get the ratings.

It's on FX, which means they'll repeat it several times that same night, plus a couple more times during the upcoming week. Made it easier for me to record Rescue Me and Sons of Anarchy on busy nights.
post #26 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young C View Post

I'm looking forward to tonight's premier. I have SVU and CSI on at the same time. Not sure which show to watch live. Thinking I'll pick American Horror Story, so they can get the ratings.

Matters not a whit unless you're a Nielsen family.
post #27 of 486
Holy crap this is one disturbed show. It even has a gimp. Glad it's on.
post #28 of 486
Wow, pretty bizarre. Certainly interesting. Lots of twisted happenings in 1 single show, for sure. I am intrigued (plus I love Connie Britton), so I will keep watching. Definitely mature content, that is for sure.
post #29 of 486
Thread Starter 
Uh, yeah. So that happened.

The first 30 minutes I thought were pretty typical horror fare ... and then Dylan McDermott was masturbating in front of a window. Which I thought was funny. Sure, I get the masturbating part but it was an oddly hilarious choice for him to do it standing in the window. He should probably shrink himself next session.

After that the show went kind of mental, but mental enough that I want to find out what all the elements they threw in the first episode might actually mean.

Undead hot/old housekeeper? Connie Britton pregnant with the baby of evil gimp suit? Cannibal grandma in the basement? Why they don't buy more flashlights?

Great opening credits and music. The audio on this show is also excellent. The mix is really clear and the surround is really good during the weirder moments with weird and unsettling audio effects.
post #30 of 486
Excellent show. Very weird and creepy indeed.
I'll be watching for sure.

That stuff was wild.
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