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Blu-ray discs with UltraViolet technology! - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8traxrule View Post

Like I really want to watch a movie on my phone- are any David Lynch movies going to use this?

My phone can output 1080p and 5.1 PCM over hdmi....
post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvdmike007 View Post

My phone can output 1080p and 5.1 PCM over hdmi....

Will you stick it next to the TV for the 90 minute movie?
post #33 of 45
Here's a novel observation. Has anyone actually gone out and bought one of these "UltraViolet" Blu-ray discs and tried to play them back in a conventional Blu-ray player, like a PS3?

I just spent 30 minutes+ researching this topic on the internet, including AVS forum, and I have yet to see A SINGLE FACTUAL account or post of what happens when you put the friggin thing in a player!

Does it play like a regular Blu-ray disc? Does it do something else? Does anyone know?
post #34 of 45
I have. There is no issue because there is no such thing as "ultraviolet" disc. You are buying a normal BD disc. On the jacket, there is a link to web site and redemption code. You go there, sign up for an account if you don't have one, put in your code and then you can stream or download the same movie to devices without a blu-ray drive, say your phone or PC.
post #35 of 45
amirm, thanks. That isn't what is being described for some of the future Blu-ray releases. For example, Jaws that is to be released in a few weeks is being touted as including two disks: a DVD and an UltraViolet Blu-ray disc. Just repeating what I am reading. I would be pissed to say the least, if I went out and bought that package and discovered that the Blu-ray disk wouldn't play unless I had an active internet connection and had to create an UltraViolet account before it would proceed to play.
post #36 of 45
You are welcome. I am confident of that the future discs work exactly as I described. UV is a different organization from Blu-ray Association and has no ability to change that specification. It is a "layered" solution on top of BD offer; in this case, it is the addition of streaming/download rights to the same disc. So you can completely rely on such discs to be compatible with BD players of any type. The BD player never sees anything related to UV.

So while the UV offer may change in the future as the standard evolves, the trigger for it, the BD disc, remains unchanged.

All of this is motivated by the fact that BD is born in an era where computing devices are moving away from having optical drives. Tablets, phones, and small form factor notebooks do not have the mechanism to play the discs so other solutions had to be invented. Initially it was to release secondary copies of disc on extra DVDs that held the DRM protected versions of the file for PC and Mac. Now they are trying to move in this direction to allow online access. Lack of "portable" playback has been thought to be a hindrance for BD adoption and this is the way it is being resolved (or hoped to smile.gif ).
post #37 of 45
...I am confident of that the future discs work exactly as I described....

Certainly hope so. You remember when Sony imbedded that rootkit installer on their CDs? That wasn't part of the Compact Disk standard, and shouldn't have been in there, but that didn't stop them from doing it anyway.
post #38 of 45
So when the press release for JAWS claimed that it included an UltraViolet-BD, that was incorrect and misleading. Apparently, JAWS has an UltraViolet release occurring IN PARALLEL with the BD release, and included in the BD package is a card with a promotional offer code that allows you to sign-up for UltraViolet. Poor communication skills strike again.

Here are a few FACTS from Paramount's Ultraviolet BD program notes (note the 3 download limit):

Redeem Ultraviolet Movies From Blu-ray Or DVD Purchases - Enter the 12-digit code found on the insert inside the box and you are only a few clicks away from enjoying your Paramount Ultraviolet movie....

...UltraViolet movies can be downloaded to watch on the go or streamed whenever you have an Internet or Wi-Fi connection. Movies can be downloaded up to 3 times and include unlimited streams.....
post #39 of 45
And in the fine print of every UltraViolet download or streaming I've seen, there's an expiration date, usually one or two years from the time of the disc's release.
post #40 of 45
Do you think there's a market for unused UltraViolet redemption codes? I have absolutely zero interest in this technology but every time I open a new disk and throw that thing away I feel so wasteful.
post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dropkick Murphy View Post

Do you think there's a market for unused UltraViolet redemption codes? I have absolutely zero interest in this technology but every time I open a new disk and throw that thing away I feel so wasteful.
I have not looked but apparently there is a thriving market for selling those coupons on the usual sites.
post #42 of 45
So far, I love what Ultraviolet offers....I use VUDU a lot to buy my films......I can buy an HDX film, store it in the UV locker, and download it to my device's hard drive.....I am waiting for the the day UV CFF(Common File Format) is deployed, with the possibility of moving these files to my NAS......This would render the buying of BD, ripping, encoding, etc. moot for me......I have used the D2D(Disk to Digital) service and it worked well for me with my older films........Here is another info site for UV.....http://uvdemystified.com/
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by donthetech View Post

So far, I love what Ultraviolet offers....I use VUDU a lot to buy my films......I can buy an HDX film, store it in the UV locker, and download it to my device's hard drive.....I am waiting for the the day UV CFF(Common File Format) is deployed, with the possibility of moving these files to my NAS......This would render the buying of BD, ripping, encoding, etc. moot for me......I have used the D2D(Disk to Digital) service and it worked well for me with my older films........Here is another info site for UV.....http://uvdemystified.com/

What happens to all that content when hollywood decides they no longer wish to support ultraviolet and shut down the server farms which currently support the initiative?
post #44 of 45
What happens to all THAT content when the internet becomes hopelessly jammed-up with high-res UDP video streams? I've seen various published numbers stating that during evening hours, 30+ percent of the nationwide internet bandwidth is being consumed by Netflix streams.
post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by qz3fwd View Post

What happens to all that content when hollywood decides they no longer wish to support ultraviolet and shut down the server farms which currently support the initiative?

Maybe the same thing happens to UltraViolet that is now happening to BD-Live: Studios are beginning to abandon it.
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