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The 10 Biggest Problems With Modern Day Cinema

post #1 of 206
Thread Starter 
From our good friends at Den Of Geeks. Story here:

http://www.denofgeek.com/movies/1011...ay_cinema.html

Feel free to add or debate.
post #2 of 206
I don't have time to read it right now so just glanced through the headlines.

At first glance, agree completely. Especially #10. Unless they (somehow) address that, I'll continue to only go to a couple of movies each year at the theater. I am up to 2 this year thus far.
post #3 of 206
Fantastic article, great points all around.
post #4 of 206
The audience was well behaved at the last two movies I saw, but my real problem is with the image. The image produced by digital projectors doesn't seem to have a good contrast ratio. It seems rather washed out to me. Black doesn't seem like black at all. A fade to black scene shows....a glowing gray theater screen in a theater, with noticeably bright steplights on either side of me. Perhaps I'm spoiled by the image in my home theater. A fade to black shows....nothing, as in "so black you can't see your hand in front of your face". This phenomenon is dampening my enthusiasm for seeing new movies at the theater.
post #5 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertR View Post

The audience was well behaved at the last two movies I saw, but my real problem is with the image. The image produced by digital projectors doesn't seem to have a good contrast ratio. It seems rather washed out to me. Black doesn't seem like black at all. A fade to black scene shows....a glowing gray theater screen in a theater, with noticeably bright steplights on either side of me. Perhaps I'm spoiled by the image in my home theater. A fade to black shows....nothing, as in "so black you can't see your hand in front of your face". This phenomenon is dampening my enthusiasm for seeing new movies at the theater.

Present consumer home theater projection is so far ahead of DCI in this regard it isn't even funny. DCI units have much better fill, better ANSI CR and better color not to mention the DCI content and projection has better bit depth thus better color resolution and lack of banding. As you say though all of those things may not be a good trade for the raised black floor.

Art
post #6 of 206
My local theatre is excellent.The Digital pic is way better than any film and any of your HT.I have a nice HT but the sound and pic at my local theatre blows it away.I allways do the weekday early shows and the crowds are all adults and polite.Can't beat the big screen for good movies.
post #7 of 206
The problem with modern cinema.

1. Most movies suck.
post #8 of 206
After completing my theater 2 years ago, I have no intention of ever stepping inside a cinema again. In fact, I just gave my son back two Regal tickets that he gave us back in 2009.
post #9 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovieSwede View Post

The problem with modern cinema.

1. Most movies suck.

Except for the fact that they don't, this is true.
post #10 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertR View Post

The audience was well behaved at the last two movies I saw, but my real problem is with the image. The image produced by digital projectors doesn't seem to have a good contrast ratio. It seems rather washed out to me. Black doesn't seem like black at all. A fade to black scene shows....a glowing gray theater screen in a theater, with noticeably bright steplights on either side of me.

It's not like film projection was ever any better in this regard.
post #11 of 206
*yawn* . . . another Luddite Blog
post #12 of 206
Good article.

Two of my beefs:

1. As far as cinemas go, one of the horrors of the multiplex invasion was also the assault on the senses. To get keep people going to the movies, theater owners apparently felt they had to make the theater itself a "destination" and hence you get concession areas and hallways as loud, bombastic and frantic with media, lights, music and movie trailers as humanly possible.

It used to be that you'd become absorbed into the world of a good movie. As you exited the theater it was quiet and you were still able to be feeling the residue of the experience, still be "in it somewhat" and contemplative of what you just experienced.

Wheres in the multiplex all such nuanced sensations are obliterated as you leave the movie into a massive dazzling party zone, numbing your senses and removing the movie experience you just had.

Fortunately for me I'm in a film-loving city (Toronto) and so there are some decent cinema options. Even some of the multiplexes have come to tone down the dazzle and offer some peacefulness to the exterior settings of the cinema rooms.

2. The cult of youth in movies.

Yes there have always been movies made for young people. But the problem is now the vast majority of films feel the necessity of skewing to a youthful audience, which affects all areas of the film making choices. Casting and writing especially.

If you look at older movies (e.g. up to and into the 70's) you actually see respect for maturity. Many of the leads are actually adults...with...gasp...some actual wrinkles and a sense of maturity. And especially when necessary, a maturity that helps with an actor having some authority. Whenever I put on an older classic movie, I'm struck by how much of the cast including the main actors actually look older than a teenager.

But now movies are made as if we are living in Logan's Run. Mature actors
are often invisible in terms of leads, and tend to be part of the periphery.

A good example is the current Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes.

Look at the lead actors in the original from the 60's. Chuck Heston was into his mid 40's and looked it, and you could believe in his sense of authority in the movie.

Look at how it has to be made now: with a guy like James Franco as the lead scientist, barely into is early 30's, but looking and acting even younger.
He just doesn't embody any of the maturity, wisdom or experience one might hope for in a role of a brilliant scientist. But...he's cast in the lead because youth sells and he'll bring in a youthful crowd.

This is probably the most bleak aspect of current movie making, in which the pickings for believable casting and truly adult, mature films gets ever thinner.
post #13 of 206
Sorry, the biggest problem with cinema today is the all sizes fit all PG-13. It's has castrated the action film, the horror film, the thriller.

The Luc Besson produced Columbiana, which should be a hard R charging blood letting piece of celluloid, is PG-13. Why is it PG-13? because studios refuse to do R rated films now.
post #14 of 206
I find the quality of these megaplexes has gone to sh!t. I lugged myself out to watch the final Harry Potter film. For myself and a four year old, I ended up paying $28 for two tickets, a soda, and a popcorn, and agonized through 2 hours of seats that didn't even rock (the seat backs were seriously at a 90 degree angle, I had to limp out of the theater), a blurry, washed out picture, and a front right speaker that was blown, resulting in this horrific squeal/moan/feedback type noise for better than 50% of the film.

I can deal with crappy movies and bad previews. However, since building my own theater, I find it much easier to cope with bad cinema when I'm paying $1.68 for a Blu Ray, superior A/V, and am watching from the comfort of my own home, with no patrons talking, texting, or kicking my seat back for the duration.
post #15 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post

2. The cult of youth in movies.

Yes there have always been moves made for young people. But the problem is now the vast majority of films feel the necessity of skewing to a youthful audience, which affects all areas of the film making choices. Casting and writing especially.

If you look at older movies (e.g. up to and into the 70's) you actually see respect for maturity. Many of the leads are actually adults...with...gasp...some actual wrinkles and a sense of maturity. And especially when necessary, a maturity that helps with an actor having some authority. Whenever I put on an older classic movie, I'm struck by how much of the cast including the main actors actually look older than a teenager.

But now movies are made as if we are living in Logan's Run. Mature actors
are often invisible in terms of leads, and tend to be part of the periphery.

A good example is the current Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes.

Look at the lead actors in the original from the 60's. Chuck Heston was into his mid 40's and looked it, and you could believe in his sense of authority in the movie.

Look at how it has to be made now: with a guy like James Franco as the lead scientist, barely into is early 30's, but looking and acting even younger.
He just doesn't embody any of the maturity, wisdom or experience one might hope for in a role of a brilliant scientist. But...he's cast in the lead because youth sells and he'll bring in a youthful crowd.

This is probably the most bleak aspect of current movie making, in which the pickings for believable casting and truly adult, mature films gets ever thinner.



Nice post ! I couldn't agree more but wouldn't have realized it until I had my own theater and really began to watch movies half or more of which are pre 1970.

Art
post #16 of 206
^^^ I was just going to comment the same on his #2. I spend a lot of time whatch MGMHD. Younger demo is the main movie going audience. So, which came first. Movies targeting younger demo and older demo stopped going? Or, older demo stopped going so movies got targeted to younger audiences? Big generalizations, but we're not really talking specifics.

larry
post #17 of 206
Interesting and accurate article, I'd say. Still, as long as the audience is happily marching in like brainless zombies to watch sh*t movies, don't expect anything to change. I'm a fan of the independent and unorthodox films, but if I was a studio head, why wouldn't I want Michael Bay to do movie for me?
post #18 of 206
I use to work for a theater and from my personal experience and experience with customers came down to 2 things. The Audience and the PG13 movies. Which we all know come hand in hand. Not enough adult movies forcing you to go to a PG13 movie which all the teens go to. I really tried to avoid anything below R rating in a effort to have a more mature crowd but that seems to not be the case anymore. I go to a rated R movie now and see a grown adult whipping out the phone to answer a call. (which they knew someone was calling in since they didn't silence there phone.) I've seen people have
conversations. Take pictures.

When I use to work at the theater the GM would stand by the entrance to the movie and let all the adult know that there are a large amount of teens and we will try but wont be able to silence them all and if they wanted they could switch movies or get a refund or stay in the movie with no refund if it was ruined my talkers and cell phone.
post #19 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by smudge981 View Post

From our good friends at Den Of Geeks. Story here:

http://www.denofgeek.com/movies/1011...ay_cinema.html

Feel free to add or debate.

Thanks smudge - mediocrity for profit is something we all despise, I hope
post #20 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by lwright84 View Post

Except for the fact that they don't, this is true.

You must have a very low standard of expectations. Sometimes I wonder if in our desperation to see something that doesn't disappoint us, we give movies that are middling at best too much praise just because they simply don't plain suck out loud. Rise of the Planet of the Apes seems to be the summers consensus pick in these parts for the best movie of the season thus far. I just shake my head at how so many movie goers and critics seem to like such an average film. The only conclusion I can come to is that its better than most of the absolute crap thats been released lately.
post #21 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt_Stevens View Post

Sorry, the biggest problem with cinema today is the all sizes fit all PG-13. It's has castrated the action film, the horror film, the thriller.

The Luc Besson produced Columbiana, which should be a hard R charging blood letting piece of celluloid, is PG-13. Why is it PG-13? because studios refuse to do R rated films now.

Right on the mark! Too many neutered movies that have little impact because the subject matter is meant for R to adequately portray. Pick a lane. If you are going to make a teeny bop movie make it. If you are going to have a more mature subject matter don't water it down. You might attract an older demo if more movies weren't so lame.
post #22 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt_stevens View Post

sorry, the biggest problem with cinema today is the all sizes fit all pg-13. It's has castrated the action film, the horror film, the thriller.

The luc besson produced columbiana, which should be a hard r charging blood letting piece of celluloid, is pg-13. Why is it pg-13? Because studios refuse to do r rated films now.


+1
post #23 of 206
Just... all the classic iconic action films of the 80's... LETHAL WEAPON, 48 HOURS, BEVERLY HILLS COP, COMMANDO, RAMBO, DIE HARD.

They all would have been PG-13 were they made today. Every single one of those films would have been downgraded and raped of their adult material and they would have been lackluster as a result. All we need do is look at LIVE FREE DIE HARD to know this.
post #24 of 206
In regards to the article, i agree with # 3, 5, 8, 9, 10. I disagree with # 1,2,4,6,7.

Matt, you made a GREAT point about PG-13, i hate that so many movies are not what they are supposed to be due to wanting to drop down to a PG-13 rating, its pitiful. You can watch stuff on tv that could be called PG-13, when you go to the movies you want more.

Another fantastic point was made by R Harkness - the youth cult!! Dammit, youth youth youth, it drives me nuts already. I am not saying lets have the movies full of old farts like me, but lets strike a balance.
post #25 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

It's not like film projection was ever any better in this regard.

I've seen better digital presentations, though. Brighter, better contrast.

And I agree with all the comments about catering to teeny boppers. I mentioned this in a comparison between Conan the Barbarian and Conan the Destroyer. The first film is R rated, and very much in the savage, gory, nudity-filled spirit of the original Robert E. Howard stories. The second is an idiotic, dumbed-down-by studio-suits-so-they-could-get-more-kiddies-in-the-seats version.
post #26 of 206
I really HATE when the sound mix is off. It could be the theater does not change the sound settings to the correct levels when changing from the background music but a lot of times I have noticed the previews have sounded terrible (inaudible dialogue) but thankfully this is fixed for the feature most times. I have never had any issues with projection except one time they forgot to change a lens and they were nice enough to start it over.

A bigger problem is the declining quality of film in general. It is hard to analyze such things in an unbiased way because we all have our favorite movies however it seems there are much fewer "classics" today rather than 1970-2000. This is probably a topic for another thread of its own but how many "classics" have there been since 2000? Granted it is hard to judge what will be considered a classic in 20-30 years but "good" movies seem to be very rare today.
post #27 of 206
This is good conversation here. I tend to agree with most of the top 10 listed but also the above comments where everything seems to be catered to 10-14 year olds. Rarely is a movie catered to 30-50 years...you know, we have money to spend too!

But above all, I cant stand the inaudible dialogue issues which plagues a lot of movies! It should be impossible to mess this up with technology today but they do.

And lastly, the shaky cam effect is over done and enough already. I dont want to watch a cinematic movie that looks like the entire thing was filmed with a camcorder or iphone. As an effect for 1 or 2 scenes, fine, but not for the whole movie. The last movie I watched, Winters Bone had too much of this and it made me nauseous!

Oh, one more comment. I really hate movies that compete with each other! For example, the movie No Strings Attached is a movie about Friends with Benefits....and recently a movie called (wait for it), Friends with Benefits came out. Come on hollywood, this is not a brick and mortar store you are competing with (ie Home Depot opens right across the street from Menards and Lowes!!!)
post #28 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratpacker View Post

You must have a very low standard of expectations. Sometimes I wonder if in our desperation to see something that doesn't disappoint us, we give movies that are middling at best too much praise just because they simply don't plain suck out loud. Rise of the Planet of the Apes seems to be the summers consensus pick in these parts for the best movie of the season thus far. I just shake my head at how so many movie goers and critics seem to like such an average film. The only conclusion I can come to is that its better than most of the absolute crap thats been released lately.

Hardly, I'm just not a jaded movie watcher. I see a fair amount of crap, don't get me wrong, but I'm not so cynical to believe that it's grossly disproportionate to the amount of quality films out there. Also, I don't define "modern day cinema" by what it as at my local national chain movieplex each weekend either.
post #29 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post

2. The cult of youth in movies.

Yes there have always been movies made for young people. But the problem is now the vast majority of films feel the necessity of skewing to a youthful audience, which affects all areas of the film making choices. Casting and writing especially.

Thank you, they dont make movies like they used to, everything is "dumbed down" to please the younger generation. Who needs a good script when you have the fantastic 4 (Gore, boobs, explosions and a funny sidekick).

Quote:
If you look at older movies (e.g. up to and into the 70's) you actually see respect for maturity. Many of the leads are actually adults...with...gasp...some actual wrinkles and a sense of maturity. And especially when necessary, a maturity that helps with an actor having some authority. Whenever I put on an older classic movie, I'm struck by how much of the cast including the main actors actually look older than a teenager.

Yes in the good old days leading actors looked liked they had some life experience and not like they were in their last year of high school.

There is of course still some good movies out there, but how many times when you watch an older classic you cant help thinking how much worse that classic would have been, if it has been made today.
post #30 of 206
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankeeman View Post

Another fantastic point was made by R Harkness - the youth cult!! Dammit, youth youth youth, it drives me nuts already. I am not saying lets have the movies full of old farts like me, but lets strike a balance.

Studios has really pushed "youth worship" into overdrive. Old? You're regulated into either the stereotypical bad guy, get-off-my-lawn geezer, buffoon, or clueless participant. What happened to the days when being old was revered? Used to be kids kids craved maturity. Not only is it cool to be young and dumb nowadays but even the oldsters in Hollyweird refuse to let go of their youth.
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