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I hope I got this right

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
So On my Panasonic DMP-BD65 Blu ray player, I set DTS HD MA/ Dolby True HD to PCM, so it is decoding the audio, and sending it to my receiver. The other setting are:
downmix: surround encoded
7.1 ch reformatting: auto
dynamic range compression: off
PCM down conversion: off
Also, my blu ray player is connected directly to my receiver via red/white analog audio cables. With that, I'm getting full 5.1 surround. But I've heard it isn't lossless unless it's stereo. Is that true?
Can rca cables even support lossless audio?
Is the way I'm doing it a better alternative than connecting my tv to my receiver through coaxial?
IS IT ALL EVEN WORTH IT??!!!!!
post #2 of 7
Weren't these questions answered in your other thread?

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1354162
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
No, no they weren't.
The main problem is, I've heard that digital optical/coaxial supports lossless, but only in stereo. AND I've heard that connecting my blu ray player directly to my receiver via RCA will give me lossless, but some say it won't. All I want is a straight answer.
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninjadude973 View Post

No, no they weren't.
The main problem is, I've heard that digital optical/coaxial supports lossless, but only in stereo. AND I've heard that connecting my blu ray player directly to my receiver via RCA will give me lossless, but some say it won't. All I want is a straight answer.

You have been slightly misinformed and here is why. Rca cables come in lots of colors and plug into lots of different ports. Some are analog and some are digital. You described the color but not the port. The red and white cables won't carry a digital signal. The yellow composite cable and the red/blue/green component rca cables will carry digital. Instead of "lossless" think and say "digital". For now you want 5.1 digital sound passed from the bluray to the stereo.

If you are connecting only a single red and a single white cable there is no digital anything going on. Download a manual for a mainstream home theater receiver for free. In that manual every basic cable and connection is explained. Are you willing to try another audio connection besides red/white rca? Until then not much more we can do for you.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninjadude973 View Post

No, no they weren't.
The main problem is, I've heard that digital optical/coaxial supports lossless, but only in stereo. AND I've heard that connecting my blu ray player directly to my receiver via RCA will give me lossless, but some say it won't. All I want is a straight answer.

Hello,
Sadly, you have been given faulty information as neither Optical nor Coaxial will support any of the Lossless Codecs. Provided both your BDP and AVR have Multichannel Analog Outputs, you can get all of the Lossless Codecs. Do realize that when using MCH, the Volume level will often appear lower than say a DVD connected via OPT/Coax at the same Volume Setting, but when Level Matched will sound quite good.
I would continue to listen to DD/DTS via Optical or Coaxial.

Even if your AVR does not have MCH Inputs, you can connect 2 Channel RCA's and get the 2 Channel Lossless. This is assuming that you do not have an HDMI AVR/SSP,
Cheers,
AD
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninjadude973 View Post

No, no they weren't.
The main problem is, I've heard that digital optical/coaxial supports lossless, but only in stereo. AND I've heard that connecting my blu ray player directly to my receiver via RCA will give me lossless, but some say it won't. All I want is a straight answer.

S/PDIF whether optical or or coaxial, when sending PCM is inherently lossless, because PCM is inherently lossless (unless we start nitpicking about digital being inherently lossy due to sampling, but let's no go there.)

This has always been the case.

When people say S/PDIF does not support lossless, they mean lossless compressed audio. That would be Dolby Dig. or DTS.

HDMI support lossless compressed such as TrueHD.

Analog, would be considered lossless, so if you have multi-channel analog out (8 channels is required,) you can get lossless.

If you connect your Blu-ray player to a receiver, you have a number of options...
1) Stereo Analog (Red/White RCA cables) - If the player is decoding lossless audio, you could call this lossless. But you will get a downmix of the surround sound - if that's what you want, great
2) Multi-channel analog (8 single RCA cables, or whatever) - Lossless sure, but you need a receiver with appropriate inputs; In this case, I assume there's no downmix, you would would have a 7.1 speaker setup for proper audio
3) HDMI - Pretty much works with any speaker setup
4) S/PDIF - Pretty much works with any speaker setup; Very high quality from Blu-ray (640kbs for DD, 1.5 Mbs for DTS); Could be argued that it would be hard to hear the difference between this setup and lossless; Certainly a simple way to connect, except that HDMI is a one cable audio/video solution
post #7 of 7
Lossless and lossy refer to types of data compression. dts-MA and TrueHD use lossless compression, meaning the PCM output from the decoder is identical to the PCM that was fed into the encoder. DD and DTS use lossy compression, meaning some of the original PCM is not restored when the file is decoded.

It is not correct to call PCM lossless because there's no data compression involved.
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