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Integra DHC-80.3 - Page 113

post #3361 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by flashman03 View Post

What is this going for now? My local dealer is telling me around $2300 new with a discount from the msrp. Is that too much, pricing is hard to find for this pre/pro. I don't mind used if I can find one in good condition.
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post #3362 of 4252
I was told by a dealer he could get a B stock 80.3 with 2 year warranty for $1,350. I've never bought B stock but seems like it would be worth it.
post #3363 of 4252
I was told by a dealer he could get a B stock 80.3 with 2 year warranty for $1,350. I've never bought B stock but seems like it would be worth it.
post #3364 of 4252
Sorry for the rookie postings.
post #3365 of 4252
I'm not saying that 6 positions is better than 8. But in 8 positions, the sounds seem to be more airy and loses some details in the surround. 6 positions seem to have more depth and a cleaner detail presentation. But just do some experimenting. Try 6 than 8 and listen to see if there's much of a difference.

Peace! wink.gif
post #3366 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by theatercrazzz View Post

Sorry for the rookie postings.
Hey, don't worry, were all rookies here. Whether you've posted a dozen times or 10,000 times, were all rookies here. But were all here to help each other out and learn from each others setups.

Peace. smile.gif
post #3367 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by theatercrazzz View Post

I was told by a dealer he could get a B stock 80.3 with 2 year warranty for $1,350. I've never bought B stock but seems like it would be worth it.

Great price. Might be refurbished and a two year warranty isn't bad at all. Brand new, I'm paying $2,550.00 plus 7 percent tax and it comes with a 3 year warranty.

Peace. smile.gif
post #3368 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cigarjohn47 View Post

I'm not saying that 6 positions is better than 8. But in 8 positions, the sounds seem to be more airy and loses some details in the surround. 6 positions seem to have more depth and a cleaner detail presentation. But just do some experimenting. Try 6 than 8 and listen to see if there's much of a difference.
Peace! wink.gif

Can you stop at 6?
I thought you were locked into 8 if you choose XT32
post #3369 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by flashman03 View Post

The big thing for me is having something that will last many years. I have been happy with what I have but it just isn't performing to my expectation. I have B&W 703 towers with matching center, 685 surrounds and a ASW 608 sub. It just doesn't sound like what the setup today does and I think that is partly because 1) I don't have my receiver set properly, and 2) I still have to learn how to use this stuff, even after 4 years of ownership. HT audio is so different from car. I am doing as much reading as possible and I really think I am going to get this to compliment these speakers and my new Emotiva XPA-5 amp. I don't see me upgrading for many years except for my TV eventually. Time to read most of these 112 pages.

If you need any help or advice setting up or tweaking your system, let me know. Maybe I can give you some advice. But ask others in our forums, were all willing to help out. wink.gif

Peace.
post #3370 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post

Can you stop at 6?
I thought you were locked into 8 if you choose XT32

No, your not locked in at 8. You can even do 3 positions, but Audyssey will not kick in unless you choose at least 5 positions. I know the manual tells you to do 8 positions, but 6 seems to have a better sound according to my room and absorbtion and reflection characteristics. Like I said before bro, experiment. But make sure all your speakers are set to 80hz and small. And try putting your low pass filter on your sub at 120hz. 120 hz seems to have more details and depth in your bass when explosions occurr. They seem to be more full an accurate sounding. But experiment.

On another note, Audyssey will let you raise your corssover frequencies but will not let you lower them.

Peace.
post #3371 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by akbash View Post

I have a 2 Seaton submersive hp I figured with it having its own built in DPS i would set the Low pass filter to by pass on the 80.3. Not sure if this would make a difference compared to setting it to 120 hz. From reading questions people have posted over on the ask Audyssey forum here is a reply Chris from audyssey posted.

The LFE signal and the bass management crossover are two different things.

The crossover is responsible for taking the bass from the speakers and sending it to the subwoofer. That should be set at around the frequency where your speakers are no longer able to reproduce bass. This is called the crossover frequency.

In 5.1 content, there is an additional bass-only track called the LFE track. This is not played from the main speakers, but only from the subwoofer. This track is authored to have content up to 120 Hz and so the filter in the AVR called LFE Lowpass should be set to 120 Hz. Always. It is a mistake for AVR makers to even make this an option as it has nothing to do with bass management.

I am still on the fence about buying the Audyssey Pro kit i know you have more options with this kit like inputting your desired cross overs and then having Audyssey recalculate this for you. But is it worth the $650 does it sound that much better.

With so many options for play back with music i am still trying to figure out if like 2ch stereo or surround modes i am running a 7.2 set up Cat 12s up front and 4 Cat 8s for surrounds. I find with 2 ch play back it has more impact than using the surround mode maybe because the main voices are coming out of two speakers rather than the center channel. My Seaton Cat 12s pack a power full punch. Then you add the 2 submersives it can really slap you silly with punchy bass. I have only had my 80.3 running for a week now so i still have lots to learn.

 

The Pro Kit is the 'icing on the cake'. XT32 is the really big step forward. Have a look at the Pro Kit FAQ linked in my sig for a full list of all that Pro offers over and above basic XT32.

 

If it was me, I would make some measuring gear my next step before I added Pro. Something like REW or OmniMic. (Assuming you don't already have this).

post #3372 of 4252
You can get a used Audyssey kit on ebaY for $200.00. I talked to the guy who was selling it and he said he used it once and was going to get into the pro install profession but decided not too. He couldn't find any business in his area for it. And the kit will only work with A/V equipment that offers Audyssey implementations. There's not too many A/V equipment manufacturers who use the Audyssey in their units. Onkyo/Integra, Marantz/Denon, N.A.D., I don't know who else. So if you like the easier calibration setup, your pretty much stuck with a certain A/V manufacturer.

Though the Audyssey MultiEQ XT 32 will do everything the same as the Pro Kit except the pro kit will be able to calibrate up to 32 positions if you have a very large room or want to make your soundtracks more of an airy sound or spacious effect. But with a more airy sound effect, you will lose some details and articulation in your soundtracks.

Also the Pro Kit will make a before and after evaluation of your room accoustics and give you either a on screen graphical evaluation or a print out of the calibration results. Which will help you determine what setup to use to make your rooms sound the best it can. It's a very minimal correction and may make a slight difference in audio quality. Remember, not everyone has the perfect hearing that can hear sounds above 20khz and below 20hz and can actually pick out certain sounds accurately. Will it make that much of a difference to you; well that's up to you, maybe it will and maybe it won't. You will need a laptop computer and I think it either costs $100 or $150 per audio equipment license that your calibrating. Example: Say you have a DHC-80.3, you will need to purchase a special licence in addition to the cost of the Pro Kit from Audyssey to use your pro kit to calibrate your receiver. Audyssey will give you a code to enter into your software to calibrate your equipment. But once you get that license, you can calibrate as many DHC-80.3's as you want forever. A one time fee only for the DHC-80.3. Now say in a few years or down the road you want to purchase a new receiver. Say it's the DHC-100.4 or a different manufacturer that has the Audyssey implementaton installed it their equipment, then you would have to purchase a brand new license for that new audio equipment your calibrating. So as a professional installer who is programming many different audio equipment and who has many different licenses, it's worth it for them if they can find the customers to do the programming for a fee. I've seen calibrating fee's starting between $450 and $600 per visit. Usually $150 an hour. And the more positions being calibrated, the more it will cost you. But if you purchased your equipment from a reputable A/V store and have them install the equipment for you, I'm sure they wouldn't charge you for the calibration setup.

Getting back to stereo sound. I'm sure many people have older SACD's or use their 5.1, 6.1, 7.1......systems for stereo playback but I believe, "Master of all is the master of none" concept. Sure it would be able to do it all, but it really wasn't intended to do it all. I think you would get better, quality sound from a seperate stereo system setup. Though you can't get the SACD sound from a true stereo setup which wasn't intended for the SACD sound.

So it all comes down to personal preference. There is no right way or wrong way of doing things. We all have our own opinions on what we think is good or bad.

It really doesn't make a difference what method you choose, as long as you like it and it gives you what your looking for in whatever your achieving.

Me, I prefer peace of mind. I can afford to overkill anything. I have no budget. But I do try to make humble approaches to many different configurations I'm trying to perform. Even though I can afford to spend $200,000.00 on audio equipment, I choose not to cause I really don't need it. My hearing is starting to fail me and I can only hear up to 16khz so what's the use in spending top dollar on audio equipment when I won't be able to achieve the true sounds it's supposed to put out. And I'm not the bragging type to tell people that I have a $100,000.00 Krell movie theater system in my house. Spending $2,000 to $6,000 on A/V equipment is good enough for my needs. It's for me to enjoy than anyone else. Life is short but I try to be practical to a certain degree in my A/V purchases. But I also prefer peace of mind in my purchases. So if it makes you happy than do it. But now were getting back to our own personal opinions again and whether were right or wrong in our own world is pretty much for us to figure out.

Once again you make good valid points and I hope I'm able to keep steering you in the right direction and help you achieve peace of mind which is all that really matters in the end. But as I tell many people, over and over again, experiment. What's right for me and my room accoustics may not be good for your room and it's accoustics.

Experiment, experiment, experiment is the true key to success, though within reason.

Have another great day my friend and good luck with your never ending adventures. wink.gif
post #3373 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cigarjohn47 View Post

 

 

If I could just amplify a few of the points you make wrt to Audyssey...

 

Quote:
Though the Audyssey MultiEQ XT 32 will do everything the same as the Pro Kit except the pro kit will be able to calibrate up to 32 positions if you have a very large room or want to make your soundtracks more of an airy sound or spacious effect. But with a more airy sound effect, you will lose some details and articulation in your soundtracks.

 

There are other benefits of the Pro Kit:

 

  • The Pro kit comes with an individually calibrated mic which will give more accurate measurements and therefore a better end result. 

 

  • The extra processing power of the computer Pro runs on is used to analyse the data. One result of that is, unlike any other version of Audyssey MultEQ, different potential  crossovers are ranked to optimise the splice with the satellites. Then, once you chose a crossover, again unlike any other version of Audyssey MultEQ, a unique high-pass filter is applied, optimised for that crossover.

 

  • Unlike any other version of Audyssey MultEQ, Pro allows you to save your measurements and then reload them at any time. You can save as many measurement files as your computer has room for (effectively a limitless number) and this can be very useful in allowing the freedom to try different measurements, mic positions etc, without the fear of 'losing forever' a known good calibration.

 

  • Audyssey Pro also allows you to tweak the target curves using the Curve Editor. You can initially select from 3 different target curves, choose whether to apply Midrange Compensation and finally you can customise your chosen curve using the Curve Editor.  You can use the same (reloaded) measurement file to create the custom curves - there is no need to re-run the calibration. 

 

Quote:
Also the Pro Kit will make a before and after evaluation of your room accoustics and give you either a on screen graphical evaluation or a print out of the calibration results.

 

This is true but remember that the 'after' graph is only a calculated graph based on what Audyssey expects to do. Audyssey Pro makes no measurements of the result of the calibration, so the 'after' graph is just a calculated representation and not based on actual measurements. To truly see what Audyssey (Pro) has done, one needs external measuring gear such as OmniMic or REW.

 

Quote:
 You will need a laptop computer and I think it either costs $100 or $150 per audio equipment license that your calibrating

 

$150 per unit.

 

Quote:
 But once you get that license, you can calibrate as many DHC-80.3's as you want forever

 

No - you can calibrate the one DHC-80.3 as many times as you want on that same licence - but if you want to calibrate a different 80.3 then you will need to buy a separate licence for it. The licence is tied to an individual machine.

post #3374 of 4252
[/LIST]


This is true but remember that the 'after' graph is only a calculated graph based on what Audyssey expects to do. Audyssey Pro makes no measurements of the result of the calibration, so the 'after' graph is just a calculated representation and not based on actual measurements. To truly see what Audyssey (Pro) has done, one needs external measuring gear such as OmniMic or REW.


I never understood why it doesn't give you the actual results too especially on the pro version.. Prediction is great, but the final result would be nice not having to pullout the REW too.
post #3375 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cigarjohn47 View Post

No, your not locked in at 8. You can even do 3 positions, but Audyssey will not kick in unless you choose at least 5 positions. I know the manual tells you to do 8 positions, but 6 seems to have a better sound according to my room and absorbtion and reflection characteristics. Like I said before bro, experiment. But make sure all your speakers are set to 80hz and small. And try putting your low pass filter on your sub at 120hz. 120 hz seems to have more details and depth in your bass when explosions occurr. They seem to be more full an accurate sounding. But experiment.
On another note, Audyssey will let you raise your corssover frequencies but will not let you lower them.
Peace.

Ive tried to demo the 6 mic positions you have rather than the 8, but Im having trouble doing so....
When I get to 6 it then prompts you to move the mic into the 7th position and after the 8th, I cant see how you can stop after the 6th and get to the calculation page, can you help me please?

You mention "6 positions seem to have more depth and a cleaner detail presentation", thats what I prefer to the more airy sound.
post #3376 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by lbrown105 View Post

[/LIST]
This is true but remember that the 'after' graph is only a calculated graph based on what Audyssey expects to do. Audyssey Pro makes no measurements of the result of the calibration, so the 'after' graph is just a calculated representation and not based on actual measurements. To truly see what Audyssey (Pro) has done, one needs external measuring gear such as OmniMic or REW.
I never understood why it doesn't give you the actual results too especially on the pro version.. Prediction is great, but the final result would be nice not having to pullout the REW too.

The main reason it does not do actual post calibration results is simply because that would require another time consuming set of sweeps with test tones and the mike. Actually, there is no reason that predicted results should be inaccurate unless you believe that Audyssey has somehow used a different calculation for the prediction than the one used for the EQ filters. The only major issue with the predicted graphs is that they are smoothed at 1/6 octave. That is fine in the higher frequencies, but it may obscure audible detail in the lower frequencies.

Unlike Pro, packages designed for measurement can do a quicker job of just taking and displaying measurements, without the overhead and delays in Pro, because its primary job is getting the measurements converted to EQ filters. But, Audyssey and independent measurements are likely to give different results because of differences in spatial averaging, time windowing, frequency smoothing and a host if other technical details. That is assuming you can even get the mike setup in exactly the same spots, another reason for a measurement difference that is quite difficult to overcome. Room acoustics can vary somewhat literally inch by inch arou nd the room.
post #3377 of 4252
Hello ! new the AVS and fairly new to HT.

I just ordered the 80.3, I am finally upgrading from a 2003 outlaw 950, I expect a huge difference I hope.
One question I have, is what would be the best way to run my subwoofers being that I have 4? My current subwoofer set up is 2 powered 12s in my towers, one Earthquake 15’’ and one 12’’ MK behind the rear row of seating.

This may be overkill, but when it comes to movies I love the sound. I understand the 80.3 has 2 sub outs, should I run one to the towers and one split between the 15” and the rear 12” ?

Or should I run one to the towers and the 15’’, and the 2nd to the 12’’ being that it is in the back of the room ?

I have been reading this thread for a week and have learned a lot. Please give me any input or other ideas as I set up for my NEW PROCESSOR !
post #3378 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by lbrown105 View Post


[/LIST]


This is true but remember that the 'after' graph is only a calculated graph based on what Audyssey expects to do. Audyssey Pro makes no measurements of the result of the calibration, so the 'after' graph is just a calculated representation and not based on actual measurements. To truly see what Audyssey (Pro) has done, one needs external measuring gear such as OmniMic or REW.


I never understood why it doesn't give you the actual results too especially on the pro version.. Prediction is great, but the final result would be nice not having to pullout the REW too.

 

Because Audyssey does not perform any measurements after calibration.

post #3379 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by theatercrazzz View Post

Hello ! new the AVS and fairly new to HT.

I just ordered the 80.3, I am finally upgrading from a 2003 outlaw 950, I expect a huge difference I hope.
One question I have, is what would be the best way to run my subwoofers being that I have 4? My current subwoofer set up is 2 powered 12s in my towers, one Earthquake 15’’ and one 12’’ MK behind the rear row of seating.

This may be overkill, but when it comes to movies I love the sound. I understand the 80.3 has 2 sub outs, should I run one to the towers and one split between the 15” and the rear 12” ?

Or should I run one to the towers and the 15’’, and the 2nd to the 12’’ being that it is in the back of the room ?

I have been reading this thread for a week and have learned a lot. Please give me any input or other ideas as I set up for my NEW PROCESSOR !

 

This may give you some useful background info:

 

f)8.    How does Audyssey handle complex multiple subwoofer setups?

post #3380 of 4252
Perfect, thank you
post #3381 of 4252
With those of you who have the 80.3, would I be disappointed saving some money and buying an 80.2 used? I see certain differences obviously being 4k up-conversion (which I can't use) and some other stuff, but overall it seems pretty much similar for my general HT use. Just curious some opinions as I am willing to pay the extra 1K if I will notice much difference. I appreciate all of your suggestions.
post #3382 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by flashman03 View Post

With those of you who have the 80.3, would I be disappointed saving some money and buying an 80.2 used? I see certain differences obviously being 4k up-conversion (which I can't use) and some other stuff, but overall it seems pretty much similar for my general HT use. Just curious some opinions as I am willing to pay the extra 1K if I will notice much difference. I appreciate all of your suggestions.

I'd say going by what I've read you would be unable to tell any audible difference between the 80.2 and 80.3.
Would you be disappointed, only you can judge that? Personally I'd rather pay extra and have the peace of mind knowing I had the latest, and brand new with full warranty, but if I already had an 80.2 I wouldn't bother "upgrading" to an 80.3 for the extra couple of features it offers.
post #3383 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazy4daisy View Post


I'd say going by what I've read you would be unable to tell any audible difference between the 80.2 and 80.3.
Would you be disappointed, only you can judge that? Personally I'd rather pay extra and have the peace of mind knowing I had the latest, and brand new with full warranty, but if I already had an 80.2 I wouldn't bother "upgrading" to an 80.3 for the extra couple of features it offers.

 Anticipating a long time without a processor, I purchased an 80.3 while my 80.2 was being repaired. (It only took 5 days) After I got it into the rack & was connecting things, I discovered that my audio cassette input was missing (I have a lot of connected devices & am wishing there were more inputs avail) I will have to share the input with my Beta tape machine. (Already sharing HI Def DVD with Blue Ray) I could be wrong, but up-conversion may be better on the 80.2 (4K not used) & I am too lazy to swap back. (Up-conversion is used on my Laser Disk, TiVo, & DVHS tape as well) On a positive side, I like only having one on/off button.

post #3384 of 4252
Good thoughts, thanks! I am thinking I will get the 80.2 just because of cost. If I can save almost $1000, that gives me room to buy an oppo bdp and all I would have left to get is a better universal remote. I haven't fully ruled out the 80.3 though

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post #3385 of 4252
The 80.2 has the problematic version of the HDMI board. I would not buy it for this reason.
post #3386 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theresa View Post

The 80.2 has the problematic version of the HDMI board. I would not buy it for this reason.

I haven't read much about this issue. Of course, the 80.2 thread is just as long as this so I have to scour it some more to see what this issue is.
post #3387 of 4252
The HDMI board fails after about a year and a half. It seems to be an issue of overheating but even with external fans on top of the unit it still fails. Onkyo will repair it for free but that's a big hassle.
post #3388 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theresa View Post

The HDMI board fails after about a year and a half. It seems to be an issue of overheating but even with external fans on top of the unit it still fails. Onkyo will repair it for free but that's a big hassle.

I have had my 80.2 for over 2 years with no problems. Hopefully, I am not living on borrowed time.
post #3389 of 4252
So what am I gaining (or losing) by setting my sub to 'THX Ultra2'.
I am not using BGC, nor am I using any THX listening modes.
Does choosing the 'THX ULTRA2' setting in the speaker setup change any cross-overs or set the sub to 'flat'. Does it change or override any of the values that Audyssey has chosen??

Tom
post #3390 of 4252
Quote:
Originally Posted by hidefpaul View Post

^ ^ to disable video processing in the 80.3 do the following:
Using the buttons on the receivers front panel press and hold both the [VCR/DVR] button and press the [return] button. the display should show VIDEO PROCESSING: SKIP
Paul
So does this turn off video processing or just bypass it? I wish I had a watt meter to see if it cuts down on power consumption and heat.
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