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post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
On your plasmas, when watching widescreen movies do you guys zoom in to fill screen or leave it native with "black bars on top and bottom"

after breaking in plasma, can this be bad?
post #2 of 18
Native. I don't believe in babying my plasma, after all, its for my enjoyment!


(Of course, I don't abuse it either).
post #3 of 18
I want to see the intended picture and not chop off part of it so I never zoom in unless it a letterbox picture in 4:3 frame.
post #4 of 18
i hate 1.85 and prefer 2.40 ar lol but I keep it native to the source
post #5 of 18
. Black bars will not age phosphors at all while the rest of the image does age. 20% black bars of overall viewing should be OK.
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post

. Black bars will not age phosphors at all while the rest of the image does age. 20% black bars of overall viewing should be OK.

I agree. It's black bars for me. However to clean up any residual IR, I set the off timer and run a snowy white screen (ant. mode) for 15 minutes afterword, if I'm finished viewing the TV.


Ian
post #7 of 18
same for me..I hate the stretched look zooming gives...In fact,if there is a movie I love that is on and stretched...I will pass....I go "Native" all the way!!
post #8 of 18
Who in the world actually uses the zoom feature?
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mailiang; View Post

I agree. It's black bars for me. However to clean up any residual IR, I set the off timer and run a snowy white screen (ant. mode) for 15 minutes afterword, if I'm finished viewing the TV.


Ian

How much black bar stuff do you watch (%)?

Lets say that you watch black bar movies all the time, is there a way to prevent uneven phosphor wear?

And what about 4:3 stuff, lots of DVD series are 4:3 (a few: Seinfeld, Star Trek Next generation '' Deep Space Nine '' Voyager)?
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post
How much black bar stuff do you watch (%)?

Lets say that you watch black bar movies all the time, is there a way to prevent uneven phosphor wear?

And what about 4:3 stuff, lots of DVD series are 4:3 (a few: Seinfeld, Star Trek Next generation '' Deep Space Nine '' Voyager)?

I only watch Blu-Ray discs and I have a CRT for the 4:3 stuff. If I don't watch any full screen content after watching a letter boxed movie, I usually run the snow screen when I'm finished to clean any residual IR up.


Ian
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mailiang View Post
I only watch Blu-Ray discs and I have a CRT for the 4:3 stuff. If I don't watch any full screen content after watching a letter boxed movie, I usually run the snow screen when I'm finished to clean any residual IR up.


Ian
When someone wants to use a plasma for bluray/dvd movies only - i guess that would be 60/70% black bars - is that doable?
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post
When someone wants to use a plasma for bluray/dvd movies only - i guess that would be 60/70% black bars - is that doable?

I think you miss read my post. I use my plasma for most of my HD viewing which includes satellite TV, streaming and Blu-Ray movies. Any time I watch a letter box movie, or sports programing, I run a snowy screen for at least 15 minutes to clean up the residual IR or I watch full wide screen content which eventually removes it automatically. Watching full screen content along with displaying a snowy white screen regularly is like brushing your teeth daily to remove plaque. It removes IR and keeps your screen nice and clean!


Ian
post #13 of 18
^^
Quote:
Originally Posted by mailiang;
I think you miss read my post. I use my plasma for most of my HD viewing which includes satellite TV, streaming and Blu-Ray movies. Any time I watch a letter box movie, I run a snowy screen for 15 minutes to clean up the residual IR or I watch full wide screen content which removes it automatically. Using a snowy white screen regularly is like brushing your teeth daily to remove plaque. It removes IR and keeps your screen nice and clean!


Ian
that was a general question
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post
^^


that was a general question
Then I guess it is doable.


Ian
post #15 of 18
When watching widescreen movies, I do not use zoom unless there are black bars on all four sides. Yes, I do have a few oddball movies that do this to me, the one that comes to mind is "The Eagle Has Landed" (from 1976). When I use zoom on movies like that, it fills the screen and luckily does not crop on the left and right sides. In this sort of case, I'd rather take a loss of video quality than watch a small image in the middle of the screen.
post #16 of 18
Native. No point in zooming it.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Mice View Post

When watching widescreen movies, I do not use zoom unless there are black bars on all four sides. Yes, I do have a few oddball movies that do this to me, the one that comes to mind is "The Eagle Has Landed" (from 1976). When I use zoom on movies like that, it fills the screen and luckily does not crop on the left and right sides. In this sort of case, I'd rather take a loss of video quality than watch a small image in the middle of the screen.


They call it pillar boxing, and I agree it's a nuisance.


Ian
post #18 of 18
Usually leave it native for movies, but we do use the Wide Zoom option for SD 4:3 material. In other words, I don't like bars on the side.
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