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Anarchy/Dayton TM build - Page 4

post #91 of 352
Thread Starter 
TuxedoCivic--I'm actually working on the front baffles. I wish I had gotten more of the Ash than I did. I don't have much of it left.

LTD02--You're very kind, thanks. I don't have a video camera.
My biggest challenge in posting is determining the right amount of detail to include. I worry about droning on in words and photos with too much detail and boring everyone to tears, yet I want to provide enough information to be useful to others. I may have skimped a bit too much with my previous post.
post #92 of 352
PI,

You see any of the weather that was out in your parts this past week?

JSS
post #93 of 352
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmercy View Post

PI,

You see any of the weather that was out in your parts this past week?

JSS

Thanks for asking.

We were unharmed and our property undamaged, but a tornado did some real damage right here in Forney (Dallas area), just about 5 miles from our house.

We saw some footage of another tornado from the same storm in Dallas that lifted up several big-rig trailers hundreds of feet into the air and another that embedded several fence pickets into a sheetrock wall in someone's home. Those were F2s. The one that tore-up Forney was an F3, which is even worse. I forget how many tornadoes were the official count from that storm in the Dallas area, but it was more than a dozen. It is a miracle that nobody died in all that. My wife knows someone who just recently started working and had the kids in daycare, so nobody was home when the tornado hit. Only a bare slab remains where their house once stood. There are many stories like that.
post #94 of 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by PassingInterest View Post

My biggest challenge in posting is determining the right amount of detail to include. I worry about droning on in words and photos with too much detail and boring everyone to tears, yet I want to provide enough information to be useful to others. I may have skimped a bit too much with my previous post.

I only speak for myself but more pictures and more details is always a good thing. I've learned a lot from reading posts from people such as yourself.
post #95 of 352
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by djkest View Post

I only speak for myself but more pictures and more details is always a good thing. I've learned a lot from reading posts from people such as yourself.

Thanks, Dan. I'll try to include more detail.


Here's how they are looking so far--dusty fingerprints and all.




Re-saw the Ash.






Internal stresses have changed within the board after getting re-sawn and now they are cupped. Make sure you plan for that and you'll be okay. Placing a clamp at one edge makes it a bit more obvious how much the boards cupped.

post #96 of 352
Thread Starter 
I like the way the one on the right looks.
The one on the left, I'd like to move the pattern in the middle of each board closer together, by trimming an inch from each.




Then I trimmed some waste from the outer edges.
By getting some waste off, the now narrower boards have much less cupping and will need much less material removal to make them flat, which will keep them thicker.




Getting set up.




Here is a before shot. In a moment, I'll flip it over and joint a flat reference face on this board.




I haven't powered on yet--just wanted to show you the small amount of cupping I want to remove, to make this board flat. You can see a gap beneath the level at the outer edges and you can see a gap in the center at the table. The crown (peak) is up and that is how I will feed the board through the jointer.




I'm only taking off 1/32" with each pass, so it will probably take 2 or 3 passes to get a flat reference face.




After 2 passes, I am really close.




After the third pass, you can now clearly see that I have some cross-grain figure in the wood, which I can enhance later, with some honey-amber Trans-Tint dye, which will also give the wood some warmth in appearance.

post #97 of 352
Thread Starter 
Next, I want to joint an edge on each board and since this is for joinery, I want to joint the middle edge for each. The outer edges will just get trimmed off later. You can also see a line that runs the length of each board, which is an indication that it is time for me to replace the blades.




Keep the reference face pressed firmly against the fence during the next step.




Each board now has one good face and one good edge and they sit flat on the table and tight against each other.
The burnt area on the edge of the one board was caused by the cupped board rocking during the cut at the miter saw.
I should have put the crown up at the saw. It would have been more stable.




Let me back up a moment.
The design down the center of each board appears to move away from each other toward the bottom, which I didn't care for very much.




By swapping them from side to side, each board's center pattern appears to flow toward each other and I think that looks better, which is why I was careful to joint the proper edge for each.

post #98 of 352
Looking good!!
post #99 of 352
Thread Starter 
I sometimes use the shop vac on the surface planer.




This is why I like the cyclonic action of the Dust Deputy. I have filled and emptied the 5 gallon bucket many times without even looking into the shop vac and here you can see that not much gets through to the shop vac at all.




This is the advantage of a cyclone. I used to have to clean out the filter before ever filling the shop vac even once. You know the filter is clogged when you loose all your suction. As it is now, I haven't even checked the filter in months and it doesn't need cleaning, still.




I don't know if this helps anyone or not, but I just used 4 cleats to secure the shop vac to the wheeled platform.




The Dust Deputy came with 2 buckets. I think most people secure one bucket to their platform and stick the second bucket in it. I used a twist-lock approach.






The 2 wood tabs were installed with a slight twist to them (angled), so they easily slip into the locks when I twist the bucket.




You generate a lot of chips and dust when you joint or plane a face.
Sawdust is good for the dirt in your yard. You can use it during planting, for instance.
If you dispose of it on trash pickup day--bag it, so the trash collectors don't get your sawdust blown into their eyes.




I planed one face of each board, taking 1/32" off of each in a single pass only and filled the bucket 1/3 full. It was empty to start with.

post #100 of 352
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodfiend View Post

Looking good!!

Thanks, man!
post #101 of 352
Thread Starter 
Tite Bond II is a main-stay in my shop, but I wanted to try this Elmer's glue.



post #102 of 352
Thread Starter 
Two front baffles.




Mark for trimming.



post #103 of 352
Thread Starter 
Cut the ports to length.




Tweeter pass through. I think I'll use this same size for the port pass through, as well. It will make more sense in a moment.




Re-use a pass-through cutout for the port.




Well, it will make more sense later. Let's put it that way.

post #104 of 352
Interesting....great stuff, as usual.

JSS
post #105 of 352
I'm excited for these ports
post #106 of 352
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuxedocivic View Post

I'm excited for these ports

Haha!
I need to just say no to bad puns.

And, thanks for the kind words, Max.
post #107 of 352
Thread Starter 
Set the driver recess depth and do a test-route on some scrap.




Make an undersized port hole, to be routed the rest of the way later.




Epoxy the ports in place.

post #108 of 352
Thread Starter 
Trim the port opening to size.




And round it over.




Inside the cabinet, there's not much room before the port hits a brace.
So, rather than a roundover, I just epoxied some poly batting and used a twist tie to hold it until the epoxy sets. I don't know if this will help reduce port turbulence any at all or not, but I'm not positive it needs help at both ends, anyway.



post #109 of 352
Those are looking very nice!

Your posts are so educational and interesting to a beginning woodworker like myself. Keep up the great work!
post #110 of 352
PI,

I am sure you already have tons on your plate but you would be a great person to teach at a tech school. We could always use more craftsman (and women).

James
post #111 of 352
Thread Starter 
Dean100 and exojam--You're both very kind. Thank you very much.
post #112 of 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by exojam View Post

PI,

I am sure you already have tons on your plate but you would be a great person to teach at a tech school.

He is a great teacher, I know I would take his class if I could in person, in a way we are taking his class online.

Here is an apple for the teach
LL
post #113 of 352
Thread Starter 
MJAudio--You're very kind, thanks!


Trim the tops and bottoms.




I just sanded the sides.




Roundover the sides.




Ready for finishing.





post #114 of 352
Haven't been on the forum much lately - very gald to hear your family was unharmed in the tornadoes. Sounds like it was chaos for a lot of people.

Your pics of your dust-catcher and your shop vac reminded me - there's a sale on a dust catcher from Harbor Freight. I'm curious if it's worth getting or if i should just use my shopvac for router and router-table dust collection. Other than saving your shopvac filter (i don't have a dust deputy), is there much advantage to those dust-catcher fans over a shopvac?

Of course it goes without saying - another great looking project! I really like the recessed port with the big roundover. Makes me want to go out and get a planer and a jointer
post #115 of 352
Wow, those speakers look downright edible.

I shake my head every time I look at that veneer, I can't get over how good it looks. The round over on the port is icing on the cake.

I don't know how you get things done so fast. If I walked into my garage and finished making up something like that I would waste countless hours just staring and thinking "Wow, I am goooood"
post #116 of 352
PI,

What are your plans for the inside of the port tube? last ones I did in PVC were for surrounds and they faced upwards, so no finish. But this will face the audience. Want to hear what you got cookin' for it...

JSS
post #117 of 352
Thread Starter 
Max--I'm undecided at this point about exactly what I will do to the port color, though I have a couple of ideas. I do know that they will not remain white. I'm open to suggestions.

MJAudio--Haha! My numerous mistakes keep me humble. And I wish I were faster.

Joe--A shop vac has better suction. A Dust Collector moves a larger volume of air. A planer, jointer, table saw and band saw and even a router produce a large volume of chips and dust very quickly and shop vacs are easily overwhelmed and unable to keep up. The only reason I can get away with using a shop vac (on occasion) on the DeWalt DW735 surface planer, is because the 735 has its own built-in blower, which blows air and chips out with enough CFM to inflate the bag on my small dust collector, if I have it connected, but turn on the planer before I turn on the DC. I don't use the shop vac on the planer often, because a DC is a much better match. I just get a little lazy sometimes when going back and forth between the planer and jointer.

Bill Pentz has a lot more very useful information about dust collection on his site. He even has some excellent DC DIY info.
post #118 of 352
PVC must be primed to accept paint (IME), and it is not very easy painting the INSIDE of a small diameter pipe, so I wanted to see if you had ideas....I have used Paasche airburshes for short lengths (<5"), but longer lengths need brushes, and don't look as good, hence the flat black color most use - hard part will be masking the baffle well enough not to show any bleeds to the wood (which will be beautifully stained/dyed/lacqurered, of course. Gonna mix up the Target Coatings waterbase lacquer up again for this one?

JSS
post #119 of 352
If you want black ports use black abs pipe instead of PVC. Home depot carries it. Just a little food for thought.
post #120 of 352
Thread Starter 
The more I look at them, the more I like the white ports. I might leave them white after all. I'm not sure yet. But, I have leftovers that I can experiment on, if I want to change the port color.

Max--I don't think I will use the Target Coatings waterbase lacquer this time, because it will blur the line between the light and dark sections, since I intend to shoot a tint coat on all but the front baffles.
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