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Am I Confused about "Full 3D" vs "3D Ready"

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Here is what I think I understand:

If I want to watch a 3D movie (content on a Disc) then I need a 3D capable blue ray player. That movie will then be displayed on either a 3D Ready or Full 3D television.

If the 3D programming content is being delivered by my satellite company, then I must have a 3D Ready TV, because the broadcasted content has not yet been converted to 3D, as the 3D blue ray player does with the 3D movie on Disc.

If my cable company or satellite company has a receiver box that does the conversion to 3D, then I only need a 3D capable TV. Although I'm not even sure if the cable or satellite guys have such receivers.

The reason for my question: I'm getting ready to buy yet another TV, and trying to decide whether I need Full 3D or 3D Ready. I'm pretty much committed to Dish Network, and although they only offer a few 3D movies, I guess it is only a matter of time before they are widely broadcasting 3D sporting events.

Also my kids are video gamers; they have a Playstation 3 which I assume cant play 3D video games, but I'm sure they will want such video game console when it becomes available. Based on my previously stated understanding (or misunderstanding) I assume such a console would work like a 3D blue ray player and output a signal which a 3D Ready TV could display.

I would appreciate any and all comments, opinions, suggestions, etc. Thanks in advance
post #2 of 15
Some brief comments.
PS3 does now play 3D games,the games themselves need to be in 3D.
Cable boxes do not convert 2D to 3D,the broadcasts need to be in 3D.
You do not need a bluray player because the PS3 is one of the best to watch 3D movies.
Most new 3D TVs are 3D ready. If not check with the manufacturer or dealer on what is needed for 3D. In the case of my 2010 82" Mitsubishi DLP I needed an adaptor kit.
post #3 of 15
The two biggies coming up are Uncharted 3 and Ratchet & Clank All 4 One, both of which are playstation exclusives and both will support 3d.

There are some other 3d games already out there. I'll second the comment that the PS3 is a great 3d (and 2d) blu ray player. We use it with an LG 65LW6500 passive 3d tv.
post #4 of 15
3D ready usually means it will handle 120Hz at its input but doesn't convert the 3D coming from your PS3 or 3D Bluray player. With some TV's it may also mean all you need is shutter glasses.
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronomy View Post

3D ready usually means it will handle 120Hz at its input but doesn't convert the 3D coming from your PS3 or 3D Bluray player.

No, that is Nvidia 3D Vision ready

3D ready is just an expression that means the TV supports some form of 3D, but it doesn't tell you what or how. It is not a standard like HD-ready, it does not guarantee the compatibility between a tv and your various sources.

There are a number of 3D formats, all of which are 3D, they work on the same principles, they can be converted into each other easily : the differences are just how the left and right eye view are transmitted. An ideal 3D display would be able to receive all of them.

Almost all 3DTVs nowadays support hdmi1.4a formats, which is what you'd want for your all-purpose living room 3DTV.
It works with PS3 games, cable/satellite receivers, DVRs etc...
The full 3D vs.... not full 3D thing relates to the resolution of the picture when you put the glasses on. Full 3D means you get a full 1920x1080p picture in each eye. Not Full 3D means you get less (usually the resolution is shared between the eyes = half the resolution in each eye)
post #6 of 15
[quote=NSX1992;20993831
Most new 3D TVs are 3D ready. If not check with the manufacturer or dealer on what is needed for 3D. In the case of my 2010 82" Mitsubishi DLP I needed an adaptor kit.[/QUOTE]

2009s do most 2010s do not need a adaptor. I bet you bought the adaptor for no good reason.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShark View Post

No, that is Nvidia 3D Vision ready

3D ready is just an expression that means the TV supports some form of 3D, but it doesn't tell you what or how. It is not a standard like HD-ready, it does not guarantee the compatibility between a tv and your various sources.

There are a number of 3D formats, all of which are 3D, they work on the same principles, they can be converted into each other easily : the differences are just how the left and right eye view are transmitted. An ideal 3D display would be able to receive all of them.

Almost all 3DTVs nowadays support hdmi1.4a formats, which is what you'd want for your all-purpose living room 3DTV.
It works with PS3 games, cable/satellite receivers, DVRs etc...
The full 3D vs.... not full 3D thing relates to the resolution of the picture when you put the glasses on. Full 3D means you get a full 1920x1080p picture in each eye. Not Full 3D means you get less (usually the resolution is shared between the eyes = half the resolution in each eye)

Not entirely! 3D ready dlp projectors still need a converter that outputs frame sequential 120hz video. They are considered 3D ready. You can not just feed them side by side or frame packed 3D from a bluray player and these display devices are still selling this way today. You may be refering to flat panel tvs but there are other devices that are 3D ready that don't display unless you add a converter or PC with NVIDIA conversion.
post #8 of 15
1. The terms 3D TV, Full HD 3D TV, and 3D Ready TV DO NOT have official legal definitions. Each manufacturer has its own definition which is the cause of the confusion.
2. 3D Ready for most manufacturers means the TV accepts only one or two 3D formats and requires all other formats to be converted before sending to the TV.
3. 3D TV for most manufacturers (and the HDMI LLC) means the TV accepts the “mandatory” HDMI 1.4a 3D formats. Notice the “mandatory” in the statement. There are a lot more “optional” formats than “mandatory”.
4. Full HD 3D TV for most manufacturers is a marketing term for showing 1920 x 1080 pixels per eye in 3D. In fact this is an artificial term, just like Full HD being use for a 1080p TV. Artificial because CEA and EIA define HD as 720p or higher and does not make a distinction of Full vs. Partial (or less than full). This means a 1280 x 720 per eye is HD 3D as well. The CEA, EIA and FTC do not recognize the term Full HD or Full HD 3D as official terms.
5. What you want on a TV is what most manufacturers call a 3D TV. If you get a 3D Ready TV, by most manufacturers definition, you will need a 3D Converter for some sources. You also need a source device that handles 3D. For Blu-ray this would be a 3D Blu-ray player (needs to be marked as 3D) or PS3 with the latest software AND 3D disc. For gaming, a PS3, Xbox or PC with 3D gaming software and 3D games. For satellite or cable a receiver/box with 3D software and 3D channels.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DenisG View Post

2009s do most 2010s do not need a adaptor. I bet you bought the adaptor for no good reason.

Time does fly. My 82837 must be a 2009 model so I did need the adaptor. My new 2011 92" to be delivered this week does not need the adaptor but I have to use one anyway because the new emitter is not compatible with my 5 pair of active glasses.
post #10 of 15
You do not need the adapter, you just need a compatible emitter. If you want an additional emitter compatible with the glasses that came with the Mitsubsihi adatper kit, those are available from several sources:

http://www.3dglassesunlimited.com/-c...0eeb4143144bf3

http://www.tru3d.com/products/view_p...uct=Mitsubishi IR Emitter

http://www.tru3d.com/products/view_p...uct=Mitsubishi IR Emitter
post #11 of 15
You are right again. I should have called the adaptor the emitter. But why do they want $99 for the emitter alone when the whole adaptor kit including the emitter is only $99? I wonder if the builtin adaptor will allow FIOS to go through my 3D Integra for 3D. Currently I have to use a switch and an optical cable for audio.
post #12 of 15
I am confused, where are you seeing the Mitsubishi adapter with IR emitter for $99? The 3DA-1 adatper sells for about $99 but that does not include the IR emitter. The 3DC-1000 sells for about $250 and that includes the adatper, IR emitter and 2 pair of glasses. But I cannot find a package of adapter and IR emitter without also having glasses.
post #13 of 15
You are right again. My first 3D experience was when Avatar the game came out on Xbox360 with checkerboard output built in. I did a lot of research and most information at that time was that you needed a computer with 3D glasses and an emitter. I took a chance and ordered I-O glasses with the emitter. After waiting for 2 years for 3D content for my 73" 3D ready DLP I saw 3D for the first time at home. Then the long wait for the Mitsubishi adaptor so we could watch 3D bluray movies on the PS3. My dilemna was whether to buy the $99 adaptor or the $399 kit since I already had the emitter and 2 pair of glasses. I bought the whole kit and now own 5 pair of glasses compatible with the Mitsubishi emitter, 2 pair of I-O glasses with their emitter and 2 pair of Nvidia glasses with its emitter. No wonder I am getting confused. My $99 price was for the adaptor only not for the emitter.
post #14 of 15
Well there are other brands of glasses that are compatible with the Mitsubishi emitter. Some of those may also be compatible with all of your emitters. However I can see how you are confused if you have 3 emitters and no glasses compatible with all of them. Since the TV can support only one emitter at a time, it must also be frustrating changing out emitters between your needs. I know that you may be required to use the NVIDIA emitter in that system but I bet you can use the Mitsubsihi emitter and glasses for both your Blu-ray and Xbox. The adapter allows the emitter signal to pass thru even when the adapter is turned off or you are using a different HDMI input.
post #15 of 15
The only time I have to switch emitters is when I play PC games through Nvidia which converts to 3D. I don't use the I-O emitter and their glasses anymore. My Mitsubishi glasses,Samsung and Ultra-Clear are all compatible but my XpanD have to be worn upsidedown if watching with the others. Currently I am playing Gears of War on the Xbox and it has great 3D effects. Recent changes to Verizons FIOS now allow me to run the cable system through my Integra 3D AVR as now the HDMIs are talking to each other. Previously I had to use a switch running the video directly to the TV and audio through optical cable.

Mitsubishi has temporarily stopped production on some models due to the tsumani including the 92" I ordered two weeks ago creating a delay of 4-6 weeks. The good news is that Willshire will deliver their floor model tomorrow and I will have one day to enjoy it before I take a one week quad trip to Utah.
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