or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › 8 ohm AMP with 6 ohm speakers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

8 ohm AMP with 6 ohm speakers

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I've bought my first (used) AMP, a Marantz PM80. Now I was doing some research to find suitable speakers for my budget and I've found the Wharfedale Diamond 10.1 (haven't bought them yet though).

Now I've noticed that the nominal impedance of the speakers is 6 ohm and the nominal impedance of the AMP is 8 ohm. I'm wondering if this will cause any trouble?
post #2 of 7
You need to find the full specs of the amp. In most every case, amps are designed to take speakers specified as low as 4 ohms, so you should be fine with 6. There normally is a sticker or printing on the back panel stating the minimum impedance. I realize this is an older amp and may not have that.

If it is a well designed amp you should yield more output with the lower impedance.
6 Ohm speakers are very common (these days).
post #3 of 7
If an amp reads 120W/8 Ohms & 200W/4 Ohms (Range?).
Is this the limits of the ohms on the speaker you can use, in other words you can use any speakers with an ohm range between 4 and 8?

Does this mean if you use a 4 Ohms speaker your max amp output will be 200W?

P.S. here are the specs for Roald's amp;
http://audio-database.com/MARANTZ/amp/pm-80-e.html
post #4 of 7
That amp is fine with 4ohm speakers - 6 or 8ohm speakers would only be easier on it.

The speakers will work fine with that amp.

http://audio-database.com/MARANTZ/amp/pm-80-e.html
post #5 of 7
If you look at Ohm's law, it explains a lot. V (Volts)= R (Resistance) x I (Current). The Ohms is resistance and if it drops, current increases. Since Voltage stays the same the variables are Resistance and Current. The problem many amps have is with more current you have more heat. Amps are usually designed to match the resistance (or impedance) to maximize efficiency. It cost more to design an amp that can handle lower impedance speakers. In the real world, most speakers dip to 4 ohms or so in certain frequency ranges (even though they are rated at 8 ohms). I cannot think of a single consumer AVR that cannot handle a 6 ohm load. In reality many can handle 4 ohm loads under normal listening conditions.

I would be completely blown away if your amp couldn't handle a 6 ohm load. Many in here have used cheap AVRs to power 4 ohm speakers with success for many years. Speakers are not a set impedance. With each frequency the load to the amp changes. A speaker's resistance is an average given by the speaker manufacturer and is not a simple number that tells all. I think this is why people think a certain amp is better than a different amp. It just performs better with a certain speakers impedance curve.
post #6 of 7
So this is the reason for the range on my speaker showing it to be 4 to 6 ohms/50 to 200 Watts.
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzieP View Post

So this is the reason for the range on my speaker showing it to be 4 to 6 ohms/50 to 200 Watts.

Yes, there's a range as mentioned above because it's not a fixed impedance. 200 watts is probably the average power handling of the speakers, but it's hard to say for certain without more info (it could be a peak number.)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Receivers, Amps, and Processors
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › 8 ohm AMP with 6 ohm speakers