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Problem Converting DVD-A to DVD-V

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi...I am a surround sound newbie and am interested in converting some DVD-As I own to DVD-Vs playable on non DVD-A DVD players. I have used DVD Audio Extractor to separate out all the audio files to either flac or wav. They are coming out 5.1 and play on my Creative Media Player, so I know they aren't corrupted. But when I try to add them to a DVD, none of the programs I have tried will accept/process the files. Working with friends who own various DVD authoring packages, I have tired Iplex (which works great for stereo files), Audio DVD Creator, DVD Audio Solo, and DiscWelder Chrome II. I have also tried regular old DVD burning software like Roxio Creator 2012, Nero Burning ROM 10 & 11 and Nero 10 Platinum, Corel DVD Movie Factory, and AVS DVD Authoring. Whew! Can't believe I wasted all that time. I have read that Disc Welder Bronze 1000 and Disc Welder Steel will do the job but am reluctant to waste more time and money without getting input from someone who knows what they are doing. Anyway, I have posted this in other forums with no success so hope that one of you surround gurus from this forum will offer help.

Thanks in advance for any assistance you can offer me....
post #2 of 15
DVD-Video format does not support multi-channel high res audio, only stereo. If it did we wouldn't need DVD-A.

If you want to create DVD-V with multichannel audio it will have to use lossy compression such as DD or DTS. Or, just copy the DVD-V portion of the DVD-A. But of course any DVD player can play that portion anyhow. If you have some of the more rare DVD-A that do not have a DVD-V portion included, they will have to be down-mixed to stereo. DTS 5.1 at 1.5Mb has extremely good quality BTW, but finding tools with licensing to encode DTS is difficult.

If you do not have a DVD authoring program that supports 24-bit high res PCM stereo audio, you'd have to manually mux the audio and video together with one of the available tools.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info. As you can see, I am not as technically uptospeed as I probably should be to be doing this. Perhaps DVD-V is the wrong word. I am talking about just a normal multichannel DVD, or as some call it, a music DVD. I have the ripped tracks but no program seems to want to burn them. Are you saying that I ought to encode these files to DTS for them to be processed by a DVD authoring program? Sorry for not knowing the terminology...
post #4 of 15
I'm not aware of any DVD-V authoring software that can accept 5.1 PCM input. It may exist, but I'll wager it's expensive. Your best bet is just to let them play as DVD-V, which most are capable of doing on any player.
Have you tried playing the DVD-A discs on a regular player?
post #5 of 15
Audio DVD Creator website says it can import 24/96 WAV (assuming you know it's stereo) and AC3 5.1.
post #6 of 15
There is a way to rip the MLP to WAV, downsample that to 16bit/44.1kHz, and encode that to a DTS CD.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by marklizard View Post

Hi...I am a surround sound newbie and am interested in converting some DVD-As I own to DVD-Vs playable on non DVD-A DVD players.

Forgive me for asking a potentially stupid question:

Commercially-released DVD-A disks are (almost always) backwards-compatible with DVD-V players: they will contain a Dolby or DTS encode of the 5.1 mix on a separate layer from the DVD-A MLP encode.

So why are you bothering? Do you have a bunch of home-brewed DVD-As that don't support DVD-V lossy audio encodes?

Just to clarify: DVDs come in basically three flavors:

1. DVD-V - your typical commercial movie disk, also used for music disks, often with a Dolby or DTS lossy audio encode, sometimes just a lossless stereo PCM encode, playable on pretty well every DVD player on the planet (region coding notwithstanding).

2. DVD Data - used to store files/data from a PC or other computing device, not normally playable on a regular DVD video player. Needs a computer DVD drive.

3. DVD-A - an audio-centric DVD that uses a special way of encoding the audio in a lossless format called MLP. Due to the lossless audio requirements, the videostream can not be normal moving video, but can be still images in a slide show - there isn't enough bandwidth to have the audio and full video streaming off the disk. Requires special equipment to play the lossless MLP layer, hence the disk almost always has a DVD-V layer that has the same audio tracks but encoded using lossy DD or DTS.

You want to make #1 from #3, as I understand it.

And as you have found out, and others have chimed in: going from lossless MLP to AC-3 or DTS is not easy - you need the professional-level tools, since it isn't a normal consumer-level activity, because you need to re-encode the WAV files you have ripped into Dolby or DTS (which requires a specific license from either Dolby or DTS).

AFAIK,

shinksma
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
I am in the music biz and occasionally I receive demos in stereo AND 5.1 DVD-A. I guess they think it helps them stand out from the pack. I've got three of these DVD-A discs and the VIDEO_TS folders have no information in them. Everything is in the AUDIO_TS folders. What I am hearing here is that once I've extracted to wav or flac files, there is no program I can just drag these into that will add the requisite video material and audio encoding so that they may be played on my DVD player. Also, if there were, the tracks wouldn't be MLP, but lossy instead. Sounds like it would make more sense to spring for a DVD-A player....Thanks for everyone's help on this!
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Sivadselim, out of curiosity, what is the easiest way to make a DTS CD out of 5.1 wav or flac?
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by marklizard View Post

Sivadselim, out of curiosity, what is the easiest way to make a DTS CD out of 5.1 wav or flac?

I'm sure there is more than one way but what about:

DVD-A Explorer > r8brain > Surcode DTS

maybe?
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by marklizard View Post

I am in the music biz and occasionally I receive demos in stereo AND 5.1 DVD-A. I guess they think it helps them stand out from the pack. I've got three of these DVD-A discs and the VIDEO_TS folders have no information in them. Everything is in the AUDIO_TS folders. What I am hearing here is that once I've extracted to wav or flac files, there is no program I can just drag these into that will add the requisite video material and audio encoding so that they may be played on my DVD player. Also, if there were, the tracks wouldn't be MLP, but lossy instead. Sounds like it would make more sense to spring for a DVD-A player....Thanks for everyone's help on this!

If playing in your DVD player is the only objective, a number of media player boxes and BD players (cough - Oppo) support playback of 5.1 WAV or FLAC files from attached storage or via DNLA. Of course the Oppo also supports DVD-A.

So you may be trying to go the long way around the barn here. Does your current player support any audio files from USB or data discs?
post #12 of 15
I think the beast approach is to create BD disk. It supports uncompressed 5.1 PCM. If you have access to DTS encoder, then convert source files into HD-MA.
You can use several BD authoring tools both commercial and free.

You can start with MultiAVCHD ( http://multiavchd.deanbg.com ). It can convert audio only files into BD compatible image.

You do not need actual BD-R media (too expensive still), but burn AVCHD ISO image on DVD-R.
post #13 of 15
Surely it is the candidate's or client's responsibility to submit demo material in a format that is suitable for playback as laid down by the record company or whoever, not the only round, with the company to find ways to play the demo in various formats. Also just because it is a DVD-A does not necessarily mean it is high resolution or MLP encoded. You can have 16-bit 44.1 or 48 kHz 5.1 PCM tracks.

It's easy to play DVD-A on a computer with software decoder so why make all the effort (hence time and cost) to re-encode or re-author to other formats only for a demo? Or just buy a standalone player.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for everyone's input. When I get more experience with surround sound under my belt I hope to return the favor. The reason I want these files on a disk rather than on my computer is that I have a decent surround system in the living room and the sounds on my computer pale in comparison. The Bluray idea sounds interesting and I will follow up on it. And really, the main reason I am pursuing this is mainly for my own education. I am a musician and at some point I might want to author my own surround discs....
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdgrimes View Post

If playing in your DVD player is the only objective, a number of media player boxes and BD players (cough - Oppo) support playback of 5.1 WAV or FLAC files from attached storage or via DNLA. Of course the Oppo also supports DVD-A.

So you may be trying to go the long way around the barn here. Does your current player support any audio files from USB or data discs?

As far as I know, my LG Blu-ray player will only play mp3s from its harddrive (yeah, one is built in) and from DNLA. But if the actual playing is being performed by the media player maybe this is moot? Yes, the blu-ray player has a usb input as does, I think, my 7.1 amp...
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