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The Once and Future Theater - Page 12

post #331 of 1066
#2
post #332 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Fair enough. That's the answer I needed, though not really the one I wanted.

Your assistance, Ted, is irreplaceable, so thanks for stopping by! Feel free to help yourself to a beer or some chips and dip - take off your coat and stay a while.
post #333 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Well today has been landmark. I've placed my order for drywall, and I've hung the last of the OSB. I have two or three sheets leftover, that I'll probably use to build HVAC duct boots in my soffits.

What, you don't believe me? wink.gif



There's plenty of mess and whatnot to deal with, like the stack of 2x4s and subfloor stacked up behind it you see in that picture. I need to break out the silenseal over the next few days and be ready to lug some big drywall come Wednesday. That will mean planning out the next few weeks, so that I know what materials I'll need, and in what sequence, so I can stack them reasonably.
post #334 of 1066
Looks good! Congrats on the milestone. I'm envious!
post #335 of 1066
Thread Starter 
It occurred to me the other day that I hadn't referenced my overall layout much at all lately. After I built my sketchup render, I made a commitment to my design and basically memorized it. I know for those of you following along (thank you!) there is a giant gap between the things I can easily explain as we go and they come up compared to what I have been living with in my head and house for the last year and a half almost.

As a followup to the discussion about my riser height and it relationship to the stairs, I wanted to post these images from my sketchup model.
From this vantage you see the theater entrance, center-left, and the stairs coming down from the right edge of the image. The two long steps are why I will need a bunch of 3/8 bullnose. This is the area I will cover with engineered oak flooring.


This is basically the opposite view, where you see the new landing for the stairs. The landing I show here lays on top of the original last two steps of the staircase. You can also see the face of the equipment rack opening on the landing.
post #336 of 1066
Where's the damn dip
post #337 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post

Where's the damn dip

Exactly!

And what is this "TUB EGG" stuff you referenced a few posts above. biggrin.gif

When I first looked at it this is what I saw. Then an invisible hand smacked me in the forehead and I realized what you were talking about.

Congrats on the progress.

Regards,

RTROSE
post #338 of 1066
Thread Starter 
What?! you don't like guacamole?
post #339 of 1066
Thread Starter 
RTROSE, have you never had eggs in your guacamole? smile.gif
post #340 of 1066
^^^^^^^HAHAHAHAHA.........no but I have had guacamole on my eggs! Yummy! biggrin.gif

Regards,

RTROSE
post #341 of 1066
Thread Starter 
After a party like this thread has had the last week (one of many, I hope), the only responsible thing to do is clean up. I invited Axel down to check it out. He approves.


I had to make room for the new drywall. I've moved the sheet goods and the 2x4s to the next room to make way.


So here's a quick question for you guys. The silenseal I bought was calculated for the edges of the room. That was the instruction I got from John, and I understand the rationale - no problems. I'm concerned, however, about larger gaps that show up here and there in the field of the wall boards. I'll be sure to have my seams all on different lines, but should I do anything about these gaps? Some of them are pretty wide - this one might be more than a 1/4 inch.


This one on the other hand, is probably only 1/16.



Oh, and who's got a drywall lift, a shop vac, and is ready to keep building? This guy!
900x900px-LL-211ec881_photo-1.jpeg

I don't always clean up, but when I do, I prefer a shop vac. Stay tidy, my friends.
post #342 of 1066
Awesome progress! As far as the gaps go, I wouldn't worry about them. You are going to have two layers of DW covering them. Most people don't have anything behind that first layer of drywall except the next room. You should be in better shape than most!

BTW, do you bowl...... Over hand?
post #343 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

After a party like this thread has had the last week (one of many, I hope), the only responsible thing to do is clean up. I invited Axel down to check it out. He approves.


I had to make room for the new drywall. I've moved the sheet goods and the 2x4s to the next room to make way.


So here's a quick question for you guys. The silenseal I bought was calculated for the edges of the room. That was the instruction I got from John, and I understand the rationale - no problems. I'm concerned, however, about larger gaps that show up here and there in the field of the wall boards. I'll be sure to have my seams all on different lines, but should I do anything about these gaps? Some of them are pretty wide - this one might be more than a 1/4 inch.


This one on the other hand, is probably only 1/16.



Oh, and who's got a drywall lift, a shop vac, and is ready to keep building? This guy!
900x900px-LL-211ec881_photo-1.jpeg

I don't always clean up, but when I do, I prefer a shop vac. Stay tidy, my friends.

Wow! Are you available for cleanup in my theater? I am going nuts with the drywall dust I created to get the strips between the joists in my ceiling. I can't wait to do what you did and reach a point of major cleanup and reorganization.

Regarding the gaps....I would generally say this - think of your home theater as an aquarium designed to hold water. Any gaps are a potential point of weakness. Not a lot of weakness, but weakness in your envelope to be sure. Since the OSB is secured with screws, you have the opportunity for adjustment and slight recutting. If that's not an option, then I would just fill the gap with permanently flexible latex caulk and use a putty knife to smooth it out and make sure nothing protrudes the gap for when your drywall goes up. It's a very cheap fix and peace of mind for the $3 tube of caulk.

Part of your problem may also arise from the fact that you did not employ a running bond pattern with your drywall . . . in other words staggering the butt joint seams because I see the sheets below line up on exactly the same stud.

Love the new profile pic!
post #344 of 1066
Thread Starter 
I put a vacuum bag in the shop vac (man are those things overpriced!) and didn't look back. ...of course I spent most of the day down there sweeping and restacking and sweeping and vacuuming and restacking and vacuuming.

I'll see if I can find a cheap caulk to put in there when I go back down tomorrow after work.

Thanks guys!
post #345 of 1066
Are you planning to use two layers of drywall, or am I getting my threads mixed up?

If not, then I definitely agree with TMcG. If so, the caulk certainly won't hurt smile.gif
post #346 of 1066
Thread Starter 
You've got it right. I had originally waffled on the second layer of drywall and was going to use the OSB in place of the first drywall layer. I talked it over with some friends the other day and decided that the inch of floor space wasn't worth trading the nagging idea that I hadn't done it right. The extra cost is minimal in the scheme of it, and I still have to finish only one layer, so the effort isn't doubled, just increased a little.

Depending on how the pipes and cutting around everything works out, it's possible that the areas to be inside the soffits don't get the second layer, but I suspect they will. TMcG's suggestion to use a less costly caulk strikes my fancy, so that's what I'll do.
post #347 of 1066
Personally, I would (and did) seal the joints on the first layer. If you don't have enough acoustic caulk you can use DAP Dynaflex (although I think they changed the name last time I picked some up), but it gets expensive.. Much more so than the quart tubes from Ted.

Tim
post #348 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Tim, I think you mean this. It's the only one that dap.com shows as flexible among their specialty caulks and sealants
http://www.dap.com/product_details.aspx?BrandID=15&SubcatID=6
Lowe's has it for $8 For one tube (that should be enough, I think) I'll go for that.

I hate when I can't find something. I always feel silly when my search skillz fail, but that's what's happened. Someone around here in the last year or two put together some really good advice about how to set up the buckets and such for dispensing GG without making a huge mess while keeping the speedloader ready to use the next day. Anyone have a link for something like that?
post #349 of 1066
That stuff is solvent based. It does say "permanently flexible", so I guess that's a good thing. However, Silenseal and Dynaflex are water based. Dynaflex 230 is listed on the DAP site. It's a 50-year flexible caulk.

Maybe HD didn't have Dynaflex last time I was there.

Tim
post #350 of 1066
I put a few notes in my thread. I'm using my phone, but ill try to post the link

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1339540/the-plains-theater/510#post_22550215

Hopefully that works. I think the post you are looking for was posted by BIG, IIRC. I don't remember which thread it was in either, and searching from a mobile device is a disaster smile.gif
post #351 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Thanks J_P_A, your reference is good. I'll reread it before I get started. It's not the one I was thinking of - it came before yours I believe. I'l keep looking, but in any case, yours is a great start.
post #352 of 1066
Thread Starter 
I think I've got everything I need for J_P_A's patented two-bucket technique.



two buckets
one speedloader
rags
WD-40 (not pictured)
20 gallons green glue (not pictured)
extra-sharp heavy-duty utility knife blades
panel carrier
magnetic drywall dimpler screw driver bit
1 5/8" course drywall screws
2" course drywall screws
and Mr Tim's recommended Dynaflex 230

I was hoping for 1 3/4" screws for the first layer and 2 1/4" screws for the second. But 1 5/8" is more than 2 layers (7/16" + 5/8" is 9/16" less than the 1 5/8" screws) and 2" is more than 3 layers (5/8" + 5/8" + 7/16" is 7/16" less than the 2" screws). That's not a huge amount of screw getting into the 2x4, but I think it's okay.

It'll still be a few more days before I get to hang any off it (it's not even delivered yet!). I've still got to et to teh dump with some scraps and I need to schedule some help. So I'm not sure when it can be hung. Hopefully this weekend I can get stated, but maybe not.
post #353 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

I think I've got everything I need for J_P_A's patented two-bucket technique.



two buckets
one speedloader
rags
WD-40 (not pictured)
20 gallons green glue (not pictured)
extra-sharp heavy-duty utility knife blades
panel carrier
magnetic drywall dimpler screw driver bit
1 5/8" course drywall screws
2" course drywall screws
and Mr Tim's recommended Dynaflex 230


I'm pretty sure there was a 12-pack of beer too. Good luck, my friend!


post #354 of 1066
I hate those drywall screws! They've got a cheap coating on them that I have to pick out of my finger tips for weeks. Don't get me wrong, those are the same kind I'll use rolleyes.gif but I don't have to like them smile.gif

Sniveling session over smile.gif
post #355 of 1066
Thread Starter 
I've cheated the home theater gods! But there is always a price...

The delivery guys just finished dropping off the drywall. It was arranged they would place it in the garage - and I expected that they would have a small forklift that would lay it down on a pallet, and they would be on their way. They came down the driveway to check out the scene and explained that they would be laying them in one piece at a time. I asked them if it was the same to walk it through the door into the place I had cleared for the drywall, and they were amenable to that. So for $35 delivery, here's what I got:


The catch. Well, I'm not sure I would have had too many easy alternatives, and I'm comfortable with it at this point, but the drywall is the "Ultralight" variety. I didn't think to ask when I ordered, and like I said - it'll be okay.


That's this type: http://www.usg.com/sheetrock-ultralight-gypsum-panels-firecode-x.html which is described as "up to 15 lighter" Since I've committed to 2 more layers, I can make peace with this. If it were only going to be one layer, I might have to reconsider.
post #356 of 1066
UGH!!!
post #357 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Ted, would you have sent them away with it? I understand the implications, but I just couldn't see justifying changing it at this point.
post #358 of 1066
I would have absolutely sent it back. Mass is the primary driver here. We want to damp the mass, decouple the mass, get some absorption behind the mass, but at the end of the day the degree of success will be largely defined by the amount of mass.

This is especially true if you want to stop LF bass.
post #359 of 1066
I feel for you, Fred! I have to be one of the world's worst about trying to make the thing right in front of me work, even when I know it's not what I wanted. Unfortunately, I usually end up doing it twice because once I've made it work, it ends up bothering me to the point I go back and do it like I'd planned the first time. rolleyes.gif
post #360 of 1066
Thread Starter 
File this under "known weaknesses in execution" and probably under "things I would do differently next time." I'm not looking back.

2 5/8" drywall layers, at 15% mass discount, is just over 2 1/2" traditional drywall layers. Plus, it'll be easier for me to install. Like I said, I've made peace with it.
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