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The Once and Future Theater - Page 15

post #421 of 1066
Fred, are you trying to talk me into paying someone to hang may drywall?

You're going to have another layer with staggered seams, so I'd say leave it. The caveat is, if you think it's going to bug you later, you might as well just get it over with.
post #422 of 1066
Thread Starter 
You're not getting nervous about all that heavy drywall are you? wink.gif

Really, yours should be much easier, since all the studs will be plumb and on 16 centers, the ceiling level, the women are strong, and all the children above average.

If I don't think it'll impact isolation (which I don't at this point), it won't bother me. I'm happy enough thinking of the first layer of drywall as training for the finished layer.

Speaking of that - a question - there's no advantage to mudding/taping the first layer, is there? (please say no) Along the same lines - would you tape inside the soffit? I'm thinking of holding off on mud and tape until the soffit is built so I can do it all at once and save a lot of work - the seams inside the soffit for the plumbing will be basically impossible. Plus (and this is my favorite) - if the soffits are more than 12' wide (and they will be), I can center the ceiling drywall for the second layer, and have only a few easy edge seams with NO end seams in the ceiling. That'd be a pretty good plus, wouldn't it?
post #423 of 1066
Boys (my voice in a fatherly, wise and non confrontational tone) laying down the money to have my drywall hung and finished was some of the best money spent on the construction side of the build. What an experienced and dedicated crew can do in just a three or four days is well worth the money IMHO. I knew though as slow as I was I STILL would not be done with my "almost done" theater. I knew going in this would be one of the things I had hired done, but I don't regret it and think it was money well spent. The art is in the finishing and I know I would have had major issues if I had hung AND finished it.

YMMV and it's your time and your dime. biggrin.gif

Regards,

RTROSE
post #424 of 1066
Thread Starter 
"Thanks dad" I know you're right, but I think I'm going to learn this lesson the hard way. Maybe I'll find my new calling as a drywall finisher.
post #425 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

"Thanks dad" I know you're right, but I think I'm going to learn this lesson the hard way. Maybe I'll find my new calling as a drywall finisher.

Son......You are more than welcome to it. You must be "one of my boys" if you have to learn the hard way. biggrin.gif I have two sons, 180 degrees opposite one another. My youngest always, always has to learn the hard way. My oldest not so much the hard way. I understand completely where you are coming from. All I can say is you have my support no matter which way you choose. Gotta go, starting to get sappy. wink.gif

Regards,

RTROSE
post #426 of 1066
FWIW, I taped and mudded the tapered seams of the first layer. My thinking was that green glue won't do it's thing unless it's in contact with both layers. I wasn't sure if it would get good contact in the tapered areas.

I could have been overthinking it.. But it doesn't take that long to put some tape and mud on (one coat).

Tim
post #427 of 1066
Fred -

Do you have a drywall saw? The drywall saw is your friend. If you don't already have one, get one that has the grip securely attached to the handle, like, with rivets. It will cost a couple of dollars more but will be worth it. Trust me. Or learn the hard way when you try to pull it through DD+GG and the grip pulls off and you smack yourself in the face. I'm not sayin' how I know that. I'm just sayin'.

So, why is the drywall saw your friend? When you have big openings like that, put up the sheet WITHOUT the cutout, then poke the saw into about the middle of the hole, work your way to the edge and then cut around using the studs as a guide. it will be MUCH faster than trying to measure and cut it. Again, I'm not sayin' HOW I know, I'm just sayin'. The pros will do the same thing with a Rotozip around all the electric boxes, light boxes, etc.
post #428 of 1066
Thread Starter 
I have this:


I'll keep this in mind, but I think I just made my last major cut out, for this layer anyway. I'm not sure how I'd handle a second layer with the first already cut - especially since I've been trying to get the edges to overlay one another a la:
post #429 of 1066
Quote:
I'm not sure how I'd handle a second layer with the first already cut

I'd do the same thing....hang the drywall THEN cut the whole. That's what the guys that hung mine did.

And I ended up with the Kobalt version of the saw you have pictured. It has a couple of rivets connecting the grip to the handle. I should have just spent the couple of extra dollars in the first place. DOH!
post #430 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Today, I didn't have to use my AK. I got to say it was a good day.

Let's not get ahead of ourselves - there's always bad news to go along with the good, but on balance today went well. The bad news is the screen wall - I didn't take a picture to show you, because it is too shameful. However, I have a strategy to deal with it and a strategy to make sure the second layer is better, plus I know that it will be behind a false wall, so the stress is much less. So even the bad news isn't all bad. smile.gif

I had a little help for about an hour today, and Ben and I were very efficient, We got the last screen wall piece test fit (I had cut it mostly alone - again for nearly an hour this morning). Then we got the last of the pieces for the rear wall cut and test fit. This evening, I got all of them GGed and hung. You can also see the "incident" with the hammer (upper right) and the fairly horrible geometric distortion of my camera - some of my walls are not plumb and straight, but these are!


A couple weeks ago, I was concerned that I was using the GG at too slow a pace. As of today, I have hung just a hair over 700sqft of drywall, and here's the result (minus the load or so that I scooped into the new pail I opened).


J_P_A's calculation (which I checked and agreed with - thanks!) said a gallon should hang 730sqft at 1-load density. So I feel good that I'm right on. Plus, today is three days working out of four, so I'm back on track (for now at least). Thinking of renaming this the fits and starts build...
post #431 of 1066
Thread Starter 
For those of you keeping score at home, mark tonight a quick win. In about 30 minutes, I managed to cut and position (not glue or screw) four plain wall sheets without assistance. That's leaves two more sheets with weird cutouts to complete the first layer. Hopefully, I can get all that cut and hung tomorrow night, when I think I have an assistant coming by.

Alas, no photo. DOH!
post #432 of 1066
No photo, Hmmmm ????
post #433 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

I have a strategy to deal with it and a strategy....



biggrin.gif:D
post #434 of 1066
Thread Starter 
post #435 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Well, mark your calendars. Today, I finished the first layer of drywall. Only took 3 weeks. ::rollseyes::

You'll just have to take my work for it tonight - I'll come up with some pictures hopefully in a day or two. The second layer has to be faster - or at least as fast. My wife grows restless with the slow progress (not that I don't), and we agreed that if I couldn't get it done this month, we'd start hiring out some parts. Of course that's what I get for inviting her to read this thread - now she knows about all the troubles I have, as she checks in periodically from work. (Hi, honey.)
post #436 of 1066
Awesome! I bet having drywall up makes a big visual impact. That's gotta be good for motivation.

Hiring it out doesn't sound like such a bad thing either smile.gif I'm getting a couple quotes. The first was pretty high, but they made it clear they were from out of town, and it would probably be cheaper to have someone local do it. We'll see.

Hi, Fred's wife! I think there should be a support group for the wive's of AVS. biggrin.gif
post #437 of 1066
Quote:
My wife grows restless with the slow progress (not that I don't),

It is to laugh, Ha HA!

The LOGANESS has been putting up with this for SEVEN and half years. Count your blessings Mrs. Helpful.
post #438 of 1066
Thread Starter 
I need some input.

As some of you may remember, I had to skip some ceiling joists because of obstructions from the plumbing and such. As a result, the choice is
A) Hang ceiling drywall with seams in the same place in both layers
B) Allow some edges of drywall to be supported by screws only into drywall and OSB (only at edges - field screws will be in joists)
C) Hang drywall perpendicular to the first layer, greatly complicating both the hanging/cutting process, as well as the finishing.
post #439 of 1066
I've seen BIG mention in other threads that he has used B in some cases. I may be wrong about this, and hopefully BIG will chime in and correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the implication was he doesn't worry about the second layer hitting joists at the edges when he has a OSB first layer.
post #440 of 1066
Thread Starter 
That's the way I'm leaning, but I can hear my father groaning his nervousness. I don't think there would be any concern over the security of it, but it might make finishing troublesome.
post #441 of 1066
I don't follow how it would be more difficult to finish?
post #442 of 1066
Thread Starter 
It probably wouldn't - I think I'm expressing an unreasonable concern that the edges will sag unevenly.
Edited by HopefulFred - 4/8/13 at 6:59pm
post #443 of 1066
I don't think there is an issue with the OSB, you should be just fine. That is what I would do.

As for the Mrs. checking in from time to time, I think that is cool, as long as she doesn't hold you liable for others posts and comments on a wide variety of topics including internet lingo and such. Right J_P_A? biggrin.gif

When I was at the drywall stage I could not believe how much that changed the room as I had stared at studded walls for so long. Good to have that first layer done.

Keep up the progress, chin up as you are to the point where the progress is visually encouraging because things are changing and you can actually see your progress.

Regards,

RTROSE
post #444 of 1066
ZOMGB...... Ummmm... Never mind.

+1 to what RT said smile.gif
post #445 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

I need some input.

As some of you may remember, I had to skip some ceiling joists because of obstructions from the plumbing and such. As a result, the choice is
A) Hang ceiling drywall with seams in the same place in both layers
B) Allow some edges of drywall to be supported by screws only into drywall and OSB (only at edges - field screws will be in joists)
C) Hang drywall perpendicular to the first layer, greatly complicating both the hanging/cutting process, as well as the finishing.

I would not have the seams lined up...

Given that you have a layer of OSB, I don't see why this wouldn't be an issue as long as it isn't for every edge. Furthermore, the GG "bonds" the 2 layers of drywall together..making them stiffer to boot.

Just make sure you 2nd layer drywall screws are long enough!
post #446 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys. I'll stick with my plan and not feel too bad about the edges being off joists.

And thanks for the reminder, John - I have to go exchange my box of screws. I used the 2" screws for the first drywall layer (second overall) after reconsidering the 1 3/4 screws. I'll go get a box of 2 1/4.
post #447 of 1066
Thread Starter 
And now for something completely different.

I've been reading my Master Handbook of Acoustics and have gotten the itch to measure the room - physically, not acoustically, yet. Accounting for the layer of drywall that I haven't yet hung, I measured the room as carefully as I could (and found that it is nowhere near rectangular - well, most edges that should be the same are within half an inch) and found that the room (not counting the soffits, riser, or stage - none of which exists at this point, of course) has a volume of four million, four thousand, three-hundred and twenty-five point nine three seven five cubic inches. smile.gif or about 2317 cubic feet. And a surface area of 689.67 square feet. This suggests a mean free path of 13.4 feet. Larger than I had imagined, and probably an entirely useless number.

That number will come down a little with future building, but it's interesting to have these numbers in my head.
post #448 of 1066
I don't think there is enough room in my head for numbers like that. Heck, I can only remember pi out to two decimals. smile.gif

Care to share what the mean path length relates to?
post #449 of 1066
Thread Starter 
I may have missed some numbers. Nevertheless, mean free path, as the name implies, is the average distance a specular wave travels between wall (or other surface) reflections. Since most of the attenuation of sound occurs upon reflection, having fewer reflections (or reflections less often) means more sustained sounds (longer RT60, as it were) and, in theory more ambiance.

I'm sure there are far too many other variables for this to be meaningful in and of itself, but it's another metric for comparing the sizes of out small spaces.
post #450 of 1066
Ok, did I miss something somewhere, or did Fred just go all mathematics on us? Where is aaustin (Austin) when you need a math translator? If God had wanted me to do mathematics he would not have allowed calculators to be invented. biggrin.gif

Regards,

RTROSE
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