or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Once and Future Theater - Page 17

post #481 of 1066
Thread Starter 


I am thinking it must be a linestra T-6 1/2 or T-8 as they are the right proportions and available frosted. Maybe not fluorescent.

here's the source for that image http://www.bulbs.com/learning/shapesandsizes.aspx

Lightbulbsdirect calls them tubular showcase bulbs. At least I think I'm looking at the right thing. Not fluorescent.
http://www.lightbulbdistrict.com/incandescent-bulbs/tubular-bulbs/t8-showcase-tubular-bulbs.html
Edited by HopefulFred - 5/5/13 at 6:40am
post #482 of 1066
Wouldn't it be easiest to just ask the general manager at the restaurant what bulbs they use? I am sure they have a box full of spares to keep on top of burnouts when they happen.

And I know you are a hardcore DIY guy....but you could also ask the name of the designer that did that restaurant. Perhaps they would be willing to take on a small commission to assist with your theater design.

Just a couple of thoughts.
post #483 of 1066
Thread Starter 
That's funny to me, because I wouldn't have described myself as hardcore DIY guy. More of a cheapskate, really. wink.gif

I'll see if I can get any details from the management though. That's free.
post #484 of 1066
Fred, this is an awesome idea! I'm freaking jealous that I didn't think of it! I like steampunk design as well, but on the more moderate side if there is such a thing. For example, I like the look of the riveted copper plates, and the lights on the iron pipes, but I don't think you need to go as far as a steam powered popcorn machine and masking system.
post #485 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Thanks J_P_A. The missus is a big fan of the rivetted copper - she wants to do the whole door. I haven't gotten into the price of copper plate with her. We'll see.

Of course, popcorn itself is steam powered. Even in the microwave. wink.gif
post #486 of 1066
So, uh? Hang the PJ, did we?
post #487 of 1066
Thread Starter 
HA!
post #488 of 1066
Thread Starter 
It's not as though nothing has happened around here...

My wife's birthday present arrived. 16 large boxes of patio furniture.


And the wallpaper she wanted got hung.

In the dining room


and the office


Maybe you were thinking I was going to say something more home theater related. Or just something about me, and not my wife. How about this: Skyfall has a home in my 50 years of Bond collection


Okay, so that may still not be what you're looking for. I did almost finish the second layer of drywall on the ceiling (not walls). But I can't prove it.

Here's one more. Did anyone else get a new message (not like a PM, but an alert) on their community profile page? Out of no where the other day, the forum wants to welcome me and help me get started...
post #489 of 1066
Yep. I've been getting the same types of messages....

On a more positive note, the hair and makeup ads have gone....but replaced by ads for Porsche, Crest and some Vegan book?? Quite a mix of sponsors.
post #490 of 1066
Hey, man. Progress is progress. We all know that if you don't keep SWBO happy, the theater ain't gonna happen! That's a lot of boxes, BTW! Hope you've got a big patio!

I haven't been getting those messages,though. Not sure what's that's about. As far as the ads go, I had to install an ad blocker. The site was not agreeing with my Mac. It was using 5, 6, 7 gig of memory, and once it started writing to the page file, it might as well have been locked up.

Keep it up, Fred! You'll get there!
post #491 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Here's a distraction - it's home-theater-related - I promise (maybe not). Okay so maybe it's in my home, where there will be a theater - so that's related, right?

Anyway, those of you in the southeast have probably noticed that the weather this spring has been very wet. We get rain all the time this year, while the last several years have been drought, climatologically speaking. Did you know that Atlanta gets more inches of rain than Seattle, on an annual basis? Last year was pretty dry - and being the first year in this house, we were pleasantly surprised to find that the house stayed comfortable at higher temperatures that we would normally allow throughout the spring and summer.

This year, on the other hand, the house is steamy. It's not pleasant. A few days ago, I found myself turning down the temperature - down to about 70 - and still uncomfortable. I realized after I did it that bringing down the temperature without removing the moisture was only making the relative humidity even higher (bringing ambient temp nearer to the dew point without changing the dew point.) - but it was my only option. The better option would be a dehumidifier.

My first thought was to just buy a standalone unit with a humidistat and leave in the guest bathroom draining into the sink. The wife isn't super excited about that idea, and I admit I won't want to remove it whenever guests show up. That I can do for less than $200.

I did a little research and some thinking and I realized that the water drain in the laundry room could be a great place to dispose of the water while also allowing me to place the compressor and fan in an out-of-the-way area. It would be adjacent to the kitchen - a source for moisture - and adjacent to either the HVAC return or the bedroom - a place I want to keep dry.

Here's a quick video that I recorded to demonstrate the locations.



Does this seem like overkill? Does this seem like a good way to set it up, in general (obviously you don't know everything about the layout and use of my house)? What would you expect to pay for the equipment and materials to install this yourself? How would you control the unit?
post #492 of 1066
I couldn't get the video to play on my iPad, but I'll offer a couple of comments. We had to put in a dehumidifier, and we went with a 90 pint/day central unit. The past few days it's been struggling to keep up. I think you've got the right idea, though. Put it in a room with high humidity, and if you are thinking about a smaller unit like you find at the local Big Orange Box store put it somewhere that you won't have to empty the drain. Based on what we're seeing in our house I wouldn't worry much about controlling it. Turn it on, and let it run until winter..... Or longer. Even our central unit is working hard.
post #493 of 1066
I also have a central dehumidifier - had it put in last year while doing my zoning. it pulls from the hvac system return and is in the basement. It's controlled by the basement zone thermostat since the humidity is always highest down there so I just set it to a number and let it maintain. I believe it's an aprilaire 1750. Not a cheap solution but it does an inredible job. I just turned it on for the year and it pulled 4% out of the air in 30 min or less and does a great job maintaining once it gets down to whereI want it. I highly recommend the whole house dehumidifier concept.
post #494 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

I couldn't get the video to play on my iPad.
Hmm... it plays on the iPhone I used to create it (plays from on this page I mean).

If others can't get it to play, maybe they'll post. (please)

I think you can't get a whole-home ventilating dehumidifier for less than $1000. Add in some drywall and whatnot, a few feet of duct and some boots and registers. Plus a couple days - and I'm in for about $1500. That seems high, but it might be worth saving up for, compared to $180 for a cheap unit that I would have to work around and not leave set up.
post #495 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjslegacy View Post

I believe it's an aprilaire 1750. Not a cheap solution but it does an inredible job.
Well that's good news, overall. I appreciate the feedback. It looks like the Aprilaire 1750, the Honeywell DR65, and the Ultra-Aire 70H are all about the same at around $1000-$1200, but the Aprilaire is a 90 pint unit, while the others are 65 and 70.
post #496 of 1066
Do you have gas heat?

After my last F-word, and it was still drying out down there, I was advised by the guy doing my system tuneup to turn on the heat and close the windows. HIGH. Yes, even in the summer. The gas flame will dry out the air pretty quickly. You just don't want to do it when 100 degrees, but on a relatively cool day, you can dry out a LOT of air. In the winter I have to ADD moisture because the gas dries out the air.
post #497 of 1066
Fred, I think the problem with the video was just our poor internet connection. Our DR90 was just shy of $1200, but that is dealer cost. This particular unit also has an ERV to bring in fresh air from outside which is helpful since we have spray foam insulation. If you are looking for a whole home setup, the installation gets a little more complicated. You will need either a dehumidistat, or a Tstat capable of humidity control. Then you have to decide if you want it plumbed into your central air, or do you just want it to focus on an area. pluming into the central air has it's own pros and cons. I've learned that you introduce a good bit of humidity into the air by turning on the AC fan after it's been through a cooling cycle. Apparently you blow the residual moisture off the coils, and the dehumidifier has to deal with that as well.

Not sure about Fred, but we only have a heat pump. I don't recall seeing a home built in the last 20 years with a gas fired furnace in this part of the country. Everyone has gone to a heat pump.
post #498 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

I've learned that you introduce a good bit of humidity into the air by turning on the AC fan after it's been through a cooling cycle. Apparently you blow the residual moisture off the coils
Now this is good information. I hadn't considered it, but I've been leaving the fan on (not auto). I'll go change that.

Yes Tom, we do have gas heat. I don't think I could tolerate turning it on at this point though. Maybe I'll keep an eye on the forecast for a cool night, and consider it.

I'm going to borrow a small unit from someone for a while and set it up in the guest bathroom. We'll see how this goes. Once I get my HVAC feet wet downstairs, I'll probably feel more confident in dealing with this - but the price tag is off-putting for now, and I don't think my normal HVAC guys want to get involved. (I say that because we had them out with the duct hood and everything to see what they could recommend about low flow (stale air) through the guest room. They made their measurements and some notes and sketches, and said the engineer would get back with us - after about four months, he hasn't.)

Thanks guys. Maybe I'll go hang some drywall now...
post #499 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Well, no pictures to prove it, but I got a good bit done today. My sister-in-law's husband (my brother-in-law?) came over to help out with some drywall work. We got the last of the ceiling hung and basically two whole walls. That includes virtually every tricky piece, so I hope to get the last of it hung Sunday. I'm into my third (of four) pail of green glue.

We took him out to dinner at Argosy. It's the first time I have been back since we talked about the light bulbs. I asked our server, who said the owner would love to talk to us about it. He brought around one of the spare bulbs that TMcG knew he would have - the server said that they keep whole shelves of all the different bulbs around.



I'm trying to do the research and figure out if this is the way I want to go. Right now, I'm not finding all the details for parts and fitment to price out assembling some finished fixtures. I see from a quick search that the bulb is readily available, but the pricing is weird. It seems that most retailers price them as though they are selling to customers who only need one and the customer doesn't know any better. So most retailers charge about $10 per bulb (lamp, in the industry lingo, right?). On the other hand 1000bulbs will sell them for less than $2 through amazon. It's a T6, according to Donsbulbs.com. I'm familiar with this style of base, as the dual contact bayonet base is ubiquitous in automotive applications, but how do you find the socket? The socket is known as a BA15D (of which there are many variations in orientation, materials, etc). BA for Bayonet, I presume. D for dual contact, I conclude. But I don't know what the 15 refers to - I expect it's the size - diameter or some such. Donsbulbs.com shows a couple they carry that would fit, but not suit my design needs. Should I be searching for a "socket" or a "lamp holder" or a "base?" I think it's lampholder, but I can't seem to find a good assortment for sale. So if any of you speak lighting industry lingo, I think I could use a tip on searching. Google shopping for BA15D finds only lamps, while adding lampholder finds only adapters. This search for retailers was fruitless as well.

Also, as a follow up about the humidity around here - it's still rough, weather-wise, but the situation is improving some. I took J_P_A's tip (thanks!) and set the fan to auto and have gotten better results. I'm still hoping to borrow a small dehumidifier to see the effect, but haven't gotten that done yet.
post #500 of 1066
Thread Starter 
post #501 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

Anyway, those of you in the southeast have probably noticed that the weather this spring has been very wet. We get rain all the time this year, while the last several years have been drought, climatologically speaking. Did you know that Atlanta gets more inches of rain than Seattle, on an annual basis? Last year was pretty dry - and being the first year in this house, we were pleasantly surprised to find that the house stayed comfortable at higher temperatures that we would normally allow throughout the spring and summer.

This year, on the other hand, the house is steamy. It's not pleasant. A few days ago, I found myself turning down the temperature - down to about 70 - and still uncomfortable. I realized after I did it that bringing down the temperature without removing the moisture was only making the relative humidity even higher (bringing ambient temp nearer to the dew point without changing the dew point.) - but it was my only option. The better option would be a dehumidifier.
I'll preface this with a disclaimer that I'm NOT an HVAC guy, but a typical side effect of AC is to reduce the moisture in the air. If you're running your AC and its still muggy in your house, perhaps you don't have a good "exchange" happening - meaning that not enough cool air is replacing your warm air. You should have some HVAC folks run some measurements, but I'd guess that adding a few more returns might help to solve the problem. I run our AC at 74 while we're home and do not feel muggy at all. (I too live in Atlanta)
post #502 of 1066
Glad to hear setting the fan to Auto has helped. Our dehumidifier has been working quite a bit, but once we got the basement dried out after the drywall, things have settled down a lot and the humidity stays pretty low now. I do notice a sharp increase in humidity if our AC blower turns on after the air has been running. This happens when our central dehumidifier kicks on or the fan turns on to circulate air in our basement.

We may be passed the time of year when you can do this, but keep an eye on the outside humidity and temp. If they get low enough, open up the windows to help dry things out and get everything back to normal. Maybe mother nature will throw you a bone.
post #503 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Anybody want a fair deal on a used drywall lift?

I don't think I have any more use for mine. wink.gif
post #504 of 1066
Can I just borrow it? smile.gif we need a tool share program for all the one time tools we need
post #505 of 1066
Thread Starter 
I hear ya!

The thing about the lifts is that they sell used for about $100, no matter how used. So the guy who buys it new is the only one to be out any money on it.
post #506 of 1066
I picked up a lift for $160 at Harbor Freight. I've used it about 5 times (more than enough to know I want to pay someone to do the DW) including most recently doing a garage. It's not cost prohibitive if your saving the cost of paying a pro to do it- but the pro's move faster than I do- and the job is not fun.
post #507 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Chatting with the Missus about lighting tonight over dinner, I realized I didn't know if people want step lights on (dim) while a movie is playing. I don't think I'd want them for me, but are they worth having on for guests? Maybe just automated to come on with pause/stop is sufficient, or maybe always on is preferable.

(working out minimum loads for the GE)
post #508 of 1066
For guests (and forgetful folks) I would absolutely leave the lights on a low burn to avoid a twisted ankle if somebody gets up. it won't light up the room or affect your picture, so why not safety first? rolleyes.gif
post #509 of 1066
Thread Starter 
Right. That was what I was figuring. The issue is having 25 watts. The solution I suggested to my wife was a light outside the theater on the same zone. Maybe a sign displaying "in progress" or "now playing" with a backlight or something.
post #510 of 1066
I used 4 step lights with 7w incandescents. You can also use a resistor to increase the load.

Tim
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home