or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › BIGmouthinDC travels to Ohio to help build a Dennis Erskine designed space
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

BIGmouthinDC travels to Ohio to help build a Dennis Erskine designed space - Page 5

post #121 of 363
Thread Starter 
As promised I am going to recap this project and show some of the intermediate details of the build.

This project all started with the homeowner (bzbase) hiring Dennis Erskine to design a theater for his width constrained space. After receiving the plan, assembling the materials and tools , lack of time and previous HT construction experience resulted in very slow progress so I got the call.

Before I arrived the 12'4" by 23' 6" room had been framed with true room within a room principles, Decoupled walls all around, double interior walls and separate low hanging ceiling joists.





First we had to do a bunch of tasks that needed attention before we could close in the walls

A combination of framer measurement errors and uneven floors resulted in some of the low hanging isolated joists not hanging low enough. Bzbase had ripped some 1/2 inch OSB strips 1 1/2 inches wide and we tacked them to the bottom of all the joists. You can make them out in this picture



Next 9 backer boxes needed to be fabricated, these were made with a combination of OSB, Hardi Backer board (cement), green glue and acoustical sealant (from Ted White). Eight for the ceiling lights and one for smoke alarm.



To install them I use a couple of 3rd hand supports and a couple of 2x4s bridging between two joists. I positioned the box and screwed it with deck screws to the adjoining low hanging joist flush with the bottom.





Another item was to create a way to hook up the two return ducts to the existing return duct system.

Like many homes to save money the builder uses between joist space as a return air channel. In this case duct work from the upper floors came into the joist space near the side wall of the theater. The bottom of the joist was closed off with a material called Thermopan and no effort had been made to seal wiring penetrations to this channel.

So a little creativity was required to tap this return and mitigate sound leakage issues.

first some sealing.



some duct liner



fabricate a duct take off





more duct liner.



seal it up



It's not perfect, it's not how an HVAC company might do it, it might not attenuate as much sound as we would like but you play the hand you're dealt because you don't get to draw extra cards. On the far right you can see the Thermopan hanging down from the next duct I needed to attack.

There was a space between the isolated joist and the original joist that needed a none rigid air tight seal so I made a roller of insulation and 6 Mil plastic and stuffed it up there.

While I was busy doing all that bzbase was attacking the insulation. Walls and ceiling. I love it when I don't have to handle the fiberglass.



Covering the walls

Bzbase's plan for this room was a layer of 5/8 OSB and a layer of 5/8 drywall with Green Glue, it was stacked neatly in the basement by Lowe's for $2 sheet. drywall against the wall then the OSB on the outside per Bsbase's detailed instructions to Lowe's.

So up with the OSB





then some drywall



I was really smiling in this picture because it was the last piece of drywall. On this particular day bzbase had to work and I had just hung all the drywall for the walls, as he got home I was finishing this last wall.




Building the soffits

Bzbase had a few request for the soffits. The original plans called for a basic square box around the entire perimeter of the room housing the duct work. Bzbase wanted rope lights, a curved front soffit with down lights hitting the screen.

SO, First the basic box was modified:



The soffit was created with 3/4 MDF, 12 inch bottom pieces and 8 inch drops, all attached to 2x2s. About now I was glad that I had all that OSB for firm attachment, not that I would have thought twice about screwing into 1 1/4 of drywall as I have in the past.

Shot inside the soffit, we don't need pretty taped joints here!







The soffits double as the duct boots for the 4x36 inch slot diffusers so we blocked off both ends, added a duct take off fitting on one end, Bzbase lined them with Linacoustic.





the bottoms went on with screws and PL premium poly glue, the later expands as it dries to help seal it up. The top inside corner at the ceiling will get painters flexible caulk.



The slots for the Nailor slot vents still need to be cut.

Now for the tricky part, the curve over the stage.

Well actually the stage was already done so I laid the two 30 inch wide pieces of MDF over the stage and traced the curve from the bottom. Flipped them over and cut the curve. Then measured and cut a supporting structure for the curved soffit.





Added the bottom





The curved face was three layers of Masonite board laminated with the PL adhesive



Building the Riser

The Erskine design of the riser involves a perimeter of 2x10s, cross members of 8x10's. The 8x10 space is insulated and an air gap is left at the bottom. a corner slot vent is cut turning the riser into an absorber. The technical details and determining the volume and tuning appropriate for your room are His intellectual property and you should engage him for help if you are interested.





There is going to be bar seating at the back of the riser so some wiring and a conduit were required



Fotto stopped in for a day and lent a hand insulating, connecting the wiring and putting on the decking. A big THANK YOU.



The original decking design was for three layers 3/4,1/2, 3/4 of OSB with Green Glue. One night standing at Lowe's we discovered that the only 3/4 they have was T&G which was going to be a hassle so bzbase got Dennis on his phone (the kind of service you get with the full design package) and he said three layers of 5/8 was going to be OK. So that is what we did




Now if you were looking carefully at the pictures you may have noticed a bump out at the back of the room. That is a combination projection booth and sub-woofer cavity, It got a mini riser filled with sand and three layers of decking.






Building the stage

Nothing really new here other than we decided to use up some wood in bzbases basement that otherwise will have to be cut to get it out now that the basement is getting finished. So we Kerfed the piss out of a 12 ft long board to make the curved front. left about 3/8 of an inch intact.







the end cut was tricky. basically held the circular saw on the end of the board and sliced off the pie



Convinced bzbase to carry down the sand and we filled it up



Then the three layers of 5/8 and green glue



Building the screen wall

The screen wall has three parts the side columns for the left/right speakers, the false wall frame and the screen frame

The columns were on the plans as basic three sided 3/4 MDF boxes with odd angles. First I drew the outline of the column on the stage and transfered the drawing to the ceiling with the aide of a laser level.



Then I made some tops and bottom pieces for the columns and screwed them into place on top and below some spacers







Then it was just a matter of gluing and nailing the sides together with wood glue and 18 gauge finish nails.

For false walls and the screen the original Erskine plan was for a framed wall and a Stewart screen to be mounted in the opening (aperture mount?)
Bzbase wanted to go with a DIY screen with SeymourAV material.

Looking at the original Erskine plan I wondered how you were supposed to wrap a structure with an 80 inch minimum dimension with material 66 inches wide. Also I'm not fond of wrapping fabric on inside corners so I decided to take my approach to making a minimalist false wall and make the false wall with four panels to be wrapped in fabric and screwed together forming the false wall. Just insert a screen and you are done, Eliminating the goal post structure I've been building in the past.





The screen frame was made with lumber ripped 1/2 inch smaller then the false wall, and the mid span supports 1/2 inch smaller again.

In this shot all the parts are just gravity mounted but once wrapped in fabric the false wall will be screwed to the floor, ceiling and adjacent pieces.




Final shots after we cleaned up the mess.



















I'd like to thank bzbase and his family who really welcomed me and did everything to make me comfortable. The misses kept saying that it wasn't any harder to cook for 5 than 4 and I had some great dinners. The kids around make you realize how important a theater can be in bringing the family together. I secretly hope that Bzbase never gets around to the finish work and that one day I get another call.

for now it is on to the next theater.

post #122 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post


This drywall lift looks so familiar, did you steal mine?
post #123 of 363
I'm digging the Makita's based on Big's previous recommendation I bought that same set. My favorite tools, now
post #124 of 363
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by theWalkinator View Post

This drywall lift looks so familiar, did you steal mine?

if your lift is temperamental then yes bzbase must have stopped over at your place. I took a header.
post #125 of 363
Nice job! Looks like your saw got through the 3 layers of decking ok then?
post #126 of 363
Quote:


for now it is on to the next theater.

Wow,

Another teaser so quickly? Were are you off to now? If you ever stray towards or into Indiana be sure to give us Hoosiers a heads up.

Regards,

RTROSE
post #127 of 363
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fotto View Post

Nice job! Looks like your saw got through the 3 layers of decking ok then?

Yes the Bosch jig saw ($$$) with the Precision blade did the trick, light years better than I was able to do with a Black and Decker.

The precision blade is thicker and and stiffer than the others, Tom no comments please.
post #128 of 363
^ Bosch invented the Jigsaw - their pro models are awesome (best on the market IMO)
post #129 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by RTROSE View Post

Wow,

Another teaser so quickly? Were are you off to now? If you ever stray towards or into Indiana be sure to give us Hoosiers a heads up.

Regards,

RTROSE

Upstate New York is beautiful this time of year
post #130 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaustin View Post

Upstate New York is beautiful this time of year


That could be I90 in the picture.

Hey Big, if you're actually coming to NY, I'd be willing to lend a hand.

I've got the itch to build something, and nothing on my own list at the moment.
post #131 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADDUpstate View Post


That could be I90 in the picture.

Oh the great New York State Thruway. I don't see an EZ Pass visible though
post #132 of 363
I enjoyed the read. It was perfect...about two cups of coffee long!

Any projections of future progress?
post #133 of 363
Quote:


Tom no comments please.

HEY! Here I am minding my own business, not bothering anybody, and BAM! Why, I'm insulted. Yeah that's it. I'm insulted! What makes you think I would comment? I'm not that kind of guy. EVERYBODY knows that. Come on BIG, you know me better than that.




heh, heh....he said "thicker." And "stiffer." Heh! .... heh, heh!
post #134 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

There is going to be bar seating at the back of the riser so some wiring and a conduit were required


What is the wiring for? For theater seats I understand why you have wiring (power recline or ButtKickers), but what do you need wiring for with bar seating?

Is the wiring for the bar? Maybe bzbase is planning to add lighting or outlets?
post #135 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

One more day of work, then travel home. You can expect a full debriefing and commentary no later than Wednesday, come back for the full recap.


LOL, I've been looking at this pic and wondering what the explanation will be. I just realized it's an empty bucket. All this time I thought it was a cone type object smothered with green glue and that something was forthcoming about it. The pic played some tricks on my eyes...
post #136 of 363
I did too! You just fixed it for me.
post #137 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by tony123 View Post

I did too! You just fixed it for me.

LOL! Same here.
post #138 of 363
With this kind of quality work I would think Big would be travelling constantly.
post #139 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Bley View Post

LOL! Same here.

Need 3D picture.
post #140 of 363
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post

With this kind of quality work I would think Big would be traveling constantly.

I'll be offering a 10% discount for January and February for Hawaii and other warm exotic places.
post #141 of 363
Thread Starter 
This picture is what was left of four buckets after Doing GG on the backer boxes, layer of drywall and two layers of GG on the stage and riser. For Ted

post #142 of 363
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerParty View Post

Is the wiring for the bar? Maybe bzbase is planning to add lighting or outlets?

There are no easily accessible outlets along the back wall so the outlet that will be in the back face of the bar is for anything used on the bar top like a gaming system. The HDMI is for portable devices that might get used at the bar, the conduit is for anything we forgot.
post #143 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I'll be offering a 10% discount for January and February for Hawaii and other warm exotic places.

Like Wisconsin?
post #144 of 363
My basement is warm and I'm sure I could russle up some exotic BluRays
post #145 of 363
I think I'll move Big down here to work for us (we'll call it a retirement position).
post #146 of 363
Against the advice of Big, I decided to change the screen wall and call it good. Watched our first movie tonight.





post #147 of 363
Thread Starter 
OH NO! all work stops.
post #148 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

OH NO! all work stops.

THE CARDINAL SIN of HT building for sure. Come on Big, did you not learn him nothing while you were there? Sheesh man, what is he thinking?

Well I can guess that we will not see any updates for a while now.

You did all that you could Big, you did all that you could do.

Regards,

RTROSE
post #149 of 363
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

OH NO! all work stops.

Yep. It's all over. You did what you could, BIG.
post #150 of 363
I know. My oldest said after the movie "Mr Jeff was right, I just want to watch movies now. We'll keep plugging along though. Christmas was planned downtime.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › BIGmouthinDC travels to Ohio to help build a Dennis Erskine designed space