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Official Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 5010 / 6010 thread - Page 89

post #2641 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrips View Post

Hi,
I am not mixing up anything. But, yes, I was unclear. Obviously a person that is conscious about the quality of the picture would consider the easy way which is to buy a device that promises that, when set in line with the video signal, will improve it.
The signal is changed, and people, unaware of what it does to the signal do like the change.
My position, as a professional calibrator, is that if you want to improve the picture and have enough money to invest in these devices, then instead invest in a professional calibration.
When done correctly, there is a big chance you might never need anything else on the path of the video signal.
Again this is my position, not only professional but backed by a whole industry named ISF, THX, HAA and AVPRO, all of which I am a member of.

Gosh...,

I've heard this sort of thing come back around plenty of times, related to various aspects of A/V, Home Repair, Auto Repair, the switch from Tube to Solid State TVs.....just about anything where somebody or a group of individuals have spent time and money learning a craft or profession that required a specialized skill set, and tools. Progress (ie: improvements in the standards of performance Out of the Box tied to Technological improvements.) as always been the bane of those who depend upon their services not being supplanted by "built-in" capabilities and simplification of components.

You state membership in Groups who absolutely MUST maintain that their services and/or certifications are vital. However, as someone who has dealt with the average Consumer for over 35 years in A/V, I speak with authority when I state that perhaps 5% at most of any "Normal" customers would "EVER" consider spending $300.00+ for a serious Video calibration. That percentage rises of course when the consumer is swayed into purchasing a Display or Projector that is priced in the Esoteric range. But even that is changing due to the fact that with tech on such products improving at an almost exponential rate, and the "Out of the Box" expectations of Consumers haven risen disproportionately to their actual knowledge of the same, the seeming need for such services are falling rapidly. Scary stuff for those whose livelihood depends on justifying the need for such services.

I was a Charter Member of CEDIA back when their membership could be counted as being less than 4-500 souls. Yet from the onset, a primary goal for all members was to work very hard at convincing Customers that our rather expensive services were absolutely essential....that the products we advocated were worth the extra costs...that our time was so valuable that we needed to charge for "anything" we did...even estimates and phone consultations, and that in no manner, way or possible form could they ever hope to achieve A/V nirvana without them. That is no different a take than what comes from any Professional, especially one who must recoup the expense of Training and equipment.....and more importantly, maintain a income level commensurate to their own feelings of self worth.. Personally...I felt it all was becoming a bit too directed at convincing Customers of spending inordinate amounts of money on things they could not in fact ever appreciate...and was serving to price A/V systems out of the reach of normal individuals who themselves wanted something special....just not at a price that should also include an ignition key and sunroof.

All that was fine and good, if one was restraining themselves to the elitist A/V connoisseur, but an almost hopelessly futile endeavor if one was trying to bring a higher degree of performance to individuals who just might be happy to simply have an A/V system straight from JCPenny if left up to their own devices.

Nowadays, we have Video displays that have spectacular potential, and most don't come down the highway so out of sorts that they look so gawd-awful that the consumer isn't anything but impressed...if not indeed "OMG'd' over their purchase. And Consumers are often presented with quick fixes like Calibration DVDs that can indeed effect a noticeable difference. That makes trying to sell custom services a lot more difficult.

No one who knows anything at all about professional Video calibration would ever suggest that it does not have a place in the Industry. A good calibration can unlock all the potential a Display has to offer as far as it being technically as perfect in rendering an image as it is intended to be (ie: ...as it was mastered...) or adjusting it to match up with a particular surface (Front projection) and room environment.

But People are not governed by the stated performance dictates of Industry beyond what is offered as "features" on a product. (...otherwise we all would have 3D displays...) They tend instead to veer toward personal preferences. And one overriding preference is to spend money on results they feel are the most satisfying. while the Video Purist might gag at a overly sharpened image, or the dreaded "Videotape" effect of some displayed content, the Consumer might think it's the best he's ever seen....bar nothing else.

If the average end user takes a PJ like the 6010, sets it up in a room that is not wholly adverse to front Projection, and splashes it's image on a reference White Screen using the THX mode, he's close to being as far toward perfection as he needs to be without shelling out an additional $3-500.00. If the same type of individual gets a 8350 for 1/3rd the cost of a 6010, how much more so will he not feel inclined to spend cash on a pro calibration?

But if a SIMS2 Crystal owner has his Installer say "You won't believe how much difference a pro Calibration will make!", that same $500.00 might seem to be small change in return for the promise of what might be.

The hard truth about Video Calibration (...in the Consumer venue...) is that it is going the way of Audio Calibration. A few short years back, I was inundated by the Mfg Reps of a certain Audio Calibration Software to spend a considerable sum for Hardware/ Software and to get on board with charging the Consumer quite a bit for the service. Well I waited...and what do you know? All of a sudden the same High End Receiver Mfgs I used almost all started to include the same basic calibration program used by all the poor fellows who already spent $1000.00+ into that product as Pro Audio calibration experts. With such consumer aid, Consumer motivation to spend more for professional Audio calibration service tanked at the normal consumer level. That's pretty crappy. Especially when it was also suggested that despite the additional expense of including such Software / Hardware in the Receiver didn't mean one could / should forgo a professional 's efforts? Bluntly put, only in the cases where cash expenditure and room acoustics matched the need for such did the expense of a professional Audio calibration become warranted...if indeed necessary.

That's pretty much where pro video calibration is heading at the Consumer level. Just like the TV Repairman and the Stereo Repair Shops we all used to bring our gear to for warranty service, progress and innovation is leading to the dismissal of need for many such services in the majority of cases. There will always be a demand for such services....some people insist on equating expenditure with performance standards. And at times there can be no argument that such services are required. But compared to what the "Normals" out there need and demand.....?

I can see easily enough that it seems contrary to what a Pro Calibration Expert such as yourself believes in to see so many who have higher end PJs be willing to embrace a unit such as the Darbee in the attempt to "marginally" improve a relative few aspects of an image. But bear in mind those same individuals usually have discerning tastes and higher standards....and if the majority are saying "I like what I see...", then how much more so is the validity of such a processor enhnaced?

But hey....I'm not saying your opinion has no merit. It does on several fronts. No...it's your protesting that the money spent for a Darbee by anyone with that money to spend is better spent for a Pro Video calibration, and that if such is done that a Darbee is redundant (...or even detrimental...), that speaks mostly of disdane and dismissal of a product that you both have not tried and runs contrary to what you have "been raised on". wink.gif What I should have said several paragraphs back is this.

Personal preferences usually outweigh professional dictates. The Mfg of the Darbee unit doesn't suppose that the primary use of it's product is intended to supplant Video calibration. With the Darbee it's all about improving certain elements of an image that don't / cannot get addressed via a Video Calibration...simple or otherwise. And just as a poorly or insufficiently done video calibration can actually make things seem worse in the eyes of a consumer (...and what they prefer to "see"...) , overuse of the Darbee can make an image look pretty lousy.

It all boils down to what is best for the Consumer on an individual basis, not what service you can convince them they need with expressions of urgency and insistent salesmanship. If their Display and circumstances dictate the need, and their budget can justify the expense....then so be it. If not....such attempts amount to simply lining one's pockets at the expense of the gullible. (...I'm not sayin' mind you...)

Dismissing the value and need for a auxiliary device that improves aspects of the viewing experience most often noticed by the average consumer, in favor of a service that in and of itself might also be considered as being redundant by the same consumer seems a bit...well, self serving.

When the Darbee is used with discretion along with or without a video calibration of "any" type and you bet....there is a difference that the majority of end users have come to realize is both warranted and desirable.

Simply stated...those who disagree with that tend to have a vested interest in disagreeing.

Myself...I'll be including the Darbee in every equipment list I compile from here on out...because I've seen it's effect on several PJs (Epson 8350 -8700 - 5010-6010 / ViewSonic 6683ws DLP / Panasonic AX100u / JVC x3) and to each example it brought a better image than otherwise they had beforehand.
post #2642 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan View Post

Gosh...,
I've heard this sort of thing come back around plenty of times, related to various aspects of A/V, Home Repair, Auto Repair, the switch from Tube to Solid State TVs.....just about anything where somebody or a group of individuals have spent time and money learning a craft or profession that required a specialized skill set, and tools. Progress (ie: improvements in the standards of performance Out of the Box tied to Technological improvements.) as always been the bane of those who depend upon their services not being supplanted by "built-in" capabilities and simplification of components.
You state membership in Groups who absolutely MUST maintain that their services and/or certifications are vital. However, as someone who has dealt with the average Consumer for over 35 years in A/V, I speak with authority when I state that perhaps 5% at most of any "Normal" customers would "EVER" consider spending $300.00+ for a serious Video calibration. That percentage rises of course when the consumer is swayed into purchasing a Display or Projector that is priced in the Esoteric range. But even that is changing due to the fact that with tech on such products improving at an almost exponential rate, and the "Out of the Box" expectations of Consumers haven risen disproportionately to their actual knowledge of the same, the seeming need for such services are falling rapidly. Scary stuff for those whose livelihood depends on justifying the need for such services.
I was a Charter Member of CEDIA back when their membership could be counted as being less than 4-500 souls. Yet from the onset, a primary goal for all members was to work very hard at convincing Customers that our rather expensive services were absolutely essential....that the products we advocated were worth the extra costs...that our time was so valuable that we needed to charge for "anything" we did...even estimates and phone consultations, and that in no manner, way or possible form could they ever hope to achieve A/V nirvana without them. That is no different a take than what comes from any Professional, especially one who must recoup the expense of Training and equipment.....and more importantly, maintain a income level commensurate to their own feelings of self worth.. Personally...I felt it all was becoming a bit too directed at convincing Customers of spending inordinate amounts of money on things they could not in fact ever appreciate...and was serving to price A/V systems out of the reach of normal individuals who themselves wanted something special....just not at a price that should also include an ignition key and sunroof.
All that was fine and good, if one was restraining themselves to the elitist A/V connoisseur, but an almost hopelessly futile endeavor if one was trying to bring a higher degree of performance to individuals who just might be happy to simply have an A/V system straight from JCPenny if left up to their own devices.
Nowadays, we have Video displays that have spectacular potential, and most don't come down the highway so out of sorts that they look so gawd-awful that the consumer isn't anything but impressed...if not indeed "OMG'd' over their purchase. And Consumers are often presented with quick fixes like Calibration DVDs that can indeed effect a noticeable difference. That makes trying to sell custom services a lot more difficult.
No one who knows anything at all about professional Video calibration would ever suggest that it does not have a place in the Industry. A good calibration can unlock all the potential a Display has to offer as far as it being technically as perfect in rendering an image as it is intended to be (ie: ...as it was mastered...) or adjusting it to match up with a particular surface (Front projection) and room environment.
But People are not governed by the stated performance dictates of Industry beyond what is offered as "features" on a product. (...otherwise we all would have 3D displays...) They tend instead to veer toward personal preferences. And one overriding preference is to spend money on results they feel are the most satisfying. while the Video Purist might gag at a overly sharpened image, or the dreaded "Videotape" effect of some displayed content, the Consumer might think it's the best he's ever seen....bar nothing else.
If the average end user takes a PJ like the 6010, sets it up in a room that is not wholly adverse to front Projection, and splashes it's image on a reference White Screen using the THX mode, he's close to being as far toward perfection as he needs to be without shelling out an additional $3-500.00. If the same type of individual gets a 8350 for 1/3rd the cost of a 6010, how much more so will he not feel inclined to spend cash on a pro calibration?
But if a SIMS2 Crystal owner has his Installer say "You won't believe how much difference a pro Calibration will make!", that same $500.00 might seem to be small change in return for the promise of what might be.
The hard truth about Video Calibration (...in the Consumer venue...) is that it is going the way of Audio Calibration. A few short years back, I was inundated by the Mfg Reps of a certain Audio Calibration Software to spend a considerable sum for Hardware/ Software and to get on board with charging the Consumer quite a bit for the service. Well I waited...and what do you know? All of a sudden the same High End Receiver Mfgs I used almost all started to include the same basic calibration program used by all the poor fellows who already spent $1000.00+ into that product as Pro Audio calibration experts. With such consumer aid, Consumer motivation to spend more for professional Audio calibration service tanked at the normal consumer level. That's pretty crappy. Especially when it was also suggested that despite the additional expense of including such Software / Hardware in the Receiver didn't mean one could / should forgo a professional 's efforts? Bluntly put, only in the cases where cash expenditure and room acoustics matched the need for such did the expense of a professional Audio calibration become warranted...if indeed necessary.
That's pretty much where pro video calibration is heading at the Consumer level. Just like the TV Repairman and the Stereo Repair Shops we all used to bring our gear to for warranty service, progress and innovation is leading to the dismissal of need for many such services in the majority of cases. There will always be a demand for such services....some people insist on equating expenditure with performance standards. And at times there can be no argument that such services are required. But compared to what the "Normals" out there need and demand.....?
I can see easily enough that it seems contrary to what a Pro Calibration Expert such as yourself believes in to see so many who have higher end PJs be willing to embrace a unit such as the Darbee in the attempt to "marginally" improve a relative few aspects of an image. But bear in mind those same individuals usually have discerning tastes and higher standards....and if the majority are saying "I like what I see...", then how much more so is the validity of such a processor enhnaced?
But hey....I'm not saying your opinion has no merit. It does on several fronts. No...it's your protesting that the money spent for a Darbee by anyone with that money to spend is better spent for a Pro Video calibration, and that if such is done that a Darbee is redundant (...or even detrimental...), that speaks mostly of disdane and dismissal of a product that you both have not tried and runs contrary to what you have "been raised on". wink.gif What I should have said several paragraphs back is this.
Personal preferences usually outweigh professional dictates. The Mfg of the Darbee unit doesn't suppose that the primary use of it's product is intended to supplant Video calibration. With the Darbee it's all about improving certain elements of an image that don't / cannot get addressed via a Video Calibration...simple or otherwise. And just as a poorly or insufficiently done video calibration can actually make things seem worse in the eyes of a consumer (...and what they prefer to "see"...) , overuse of the Darbee can make an image look pretty lousy.
It all boils down to what is best for the Consumer on an individual basis, not what service you can convince them they need with expressions of urgency and insistent salesmanship. If their Display and circumstances dictate the need, and their budget can justify the expense....then so be it. If not....such attempts amount to simply lining one's pockets at the expense of the gullible. (...I'm not sayin' mind you...)
Dismissing the value and need for a auxiliary device that improves aspects of the viewing experience most often noticed by the average consumer, in favor of a service that in and of itself might also be considered as being redundant by the same consumer seems a bit...well, self serving.
When the Darbee is used with discretion along with or without a video calibration of "any" type and you bet....there is a difference that the majority of end users have come to realize is both warranted and desirable.
Simply stated...those who disagree with that tend to have a vested interest in disagreeing.
Myself...I'll be including the Darbee in every equipment list I compile from here on out...because I've seen it's effect on several PJs (Epson 8350 -8700 - 5010-6010 / ViewSonic 6683ws DLP / Panasonic AX100u / JVC x3) and to each example it brought a better image than otherwise they had beforehand.

Gosh... wink.gif
The way you present your ideas, it looks as if I was totally swimming in counter current...
But in fact, I agree with every word you wrote. And that's the tragedy....
That's why my skills are not my main business anymore. They are too hard to sell. I mostly do projects.
BTW, it is remarkably written (hats off)
I have my beliefs, that's true, and every time I get a hint that a customer might be receptive to those principals, I do peddle my stuff...
Anyway, I think I will keep your pamphlet aside. Might be useful to reread that once in a while wink.gif
post #2643 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffreyJonesBSME View Post

I have never owned an Epson projector, but I'm planning on purchasing the 5020UB.
I used to own a Mitsubishi projector and I purchased a non OEM lamp for it and I was very happy with it. I felt it had the same brightness as the OEM lamp. I used it for over 1000 hours before I upgraded my projector. For the difference in price, I'd definately go with the non OEM again. Be sure to buy one that comes in the housing. You can buy just the lamp or the lamp inside the housing. This makes it very easy to replace the bulb and no soldering. I got mine from Ebay at a fraction of the OEM price.

I just looked on eBay, and do not find any with housing that is much cheaper than list price.

I replaced one in a Sim2 a while back, where I got the bare lamp and changed it out of the housing. I wasn't all that hard. I wonder how hard it would be on the Epson 5010. If only held with screws, it shouldn't be a big deal, I'd think.
post #2644 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrips View Post

Hi
Do you recall the brand/website from which you bought the lamp that you recommend and have some experience with?
Thanks

I purchased it on Ebay. I don't remember it having a brand listed on it.

I'll be doing the same thing again when I need a lamp. Buying the bare lamp without the housing is cheaper, but I don't really know what needs done to attach it to the housing you already own. My impression is you'll need to do a little soldering.
post #2645 of 3334
I purchased a 6010 and am working on alignment. The PJ is set near the center of the screen with the ability to move it left right to fine adjust to horizontal center without using lens shift. PJ is mounted in an equipment closet at back of room with a port opening. The mount is attached to a shelf above it that is resting on ledger boards at the front/back of the closet, so the shelf can be slid left/right.

I want to make sure horizontal lens shift is set to the 0 (neutral) position. There is a "click/detent" when running the horizontal lens shift that I assumed marked the 0 position, until I realized that dialing to the click from the left or right shift positions puts the vertical center of the test pattern in different locations. Does anyone know of an accurate way to identify the 0 horizontal shift position?

Thanks,
DD
post #2646 of 3334
I did not do it this way.
What I've been doing is holding a wire from the middle of the lens to each of the bottom corners of the screen.
(I have very long arms)
It's clear you need two people for that.
You probably need to move that closet a bit.
This way I made sure the projector was in the middle of the screen.
Than I Used the lens shift.
Also don't zoom in fully.
Than look at the picture.
When one of the sides is a bit longer than the opposite side, turn the projector a bit in that closet/port opening to the other smaller side, and correct the picture with the lensshift.
Also bottom and top need to be checked the same way, so you might need to adjust the Screws on the front/bottom and use lensshift to correct again..
This way you can make sure the projector is strait in line with the screen.
Than you can zoom in the picture screen filling.

If the projector is not strait, than you'll end up with one corner or complete side not being sharp.

Also focussing the projector, I use binoculars.
This way you can focus on the pixel if you want.
Do not focus the projector in the middle of the screen, but 20 to 30 % form the center.
This way the picture is sharp over the whole surface.
By focussing in the middle, the corners end up a little out of focus.
You could buy a curved screen, and this problem is gone.
Edited by Matthieu - 11/14/12 at 9:32am
post #2647 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ewingr View Post

I just looked on eBay, and do not find any with housing that is much cheaper than list price.
I replaced one in a Sim2 a while back, where I got the bare lamp and changed it out of the housing. I wasn't all that hard. I wonder how hard it would be on the Epson 5010. If only held with screws, it shouldn't be a big deal, I'd think.

I bought a third party lamp for my panny ae2000 which had 3800 hours on the bulb. The replacement lamp was dimmer and completely useless after 300 hours. I will never buy one again.
post #2648 of 3334
So my projector died, which was a replacement for the first 5010 I bought. Flashing green power light, nothing happening. Got my third one today and it appears to have no startup issues at least. Convergence is another matter. My red was a whole two pixels high and 1 pixel to the left. Nasty. Apparently their refurb crew doesn't do panel alignment. Luckily there are no fingerprints on the panel like last time. I will not buy a Chinese made projector again. How I long for "Made in Tiawan" smile.gif
post #2649 of 3334
Has any noticed a predominately green image when starting up their 5010? Lately, when I turn on my projector the unit produces a strong green hue for a few mins. before the image displays a normal color pallet. Is this common? I haven't seen this issue on this unit before, or the units I've had as replacements from Epson. When I turned on the projector (the time before last) it took a couple of mins. for the image to appear on screen . . . I have a feeling this might be related to the green hue at start-up.

Another side-effect is the image is definitely dimmer than it was when first new. I've only got about 30 hrs. on this unit - so I wouldn't expect bulb dimming to be a problem so early on. The only reason the dimming became apparent is that 3D performance is really dark now - which it wasn't before.

Any thoughts would be helpful.

Ian
post #2650 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by teeger View Post

Has any noticed a predominately green image when starting up their 5010? Lately, when I turn on my projector the unit produces a strong green hue for a few mins. before the image displays a normal color pallet. Is this common? I haven't seen this issue on this unit before, or the units I've had as replacements from Epson. When I turned on the projector (the time before last) it took a couple of mins. for the image to appear on screen . . . I have a feeling this might be related to the green hue at start-up.
Another side-effect is the image is definitely dimmer than it was when first new. I've only got about 30 hrs. on this unit - so I wouldn't expect bulb dimming to be a problem so early on. The only reason the dimming became apparent is that 3D performance is really dark now - which it wasn't before.
Any thoughts would be helpful.
Ian
Yes mine is the same. I consider it to be normal
post #2651 of 3334
The first 10 hours or so, the lamp looses it's peak brightness, and get more stable than.
I'd rather calibrate after that.
post #2652 of 3334
Thanks guys. If the green start up and dimmer image is normal, I'm happy to hear that this is normal.
Ian
post #2653 of 3334
All three of mine have had the green startup thingy.
post #2654 of 3334
I'm curious if the TW9100/5020/6020 will have that same behavour.
Than we know for sure it is how it supose to be.
post #2655 of 3334
I bought a UPS ahead of getting my 6010 to back it up and ensure a cool down cycle in the event of a power outage. So I was pretty surprised to find that the fan runs for < 1 minute after going to standby mode (the Dell PJ's in my office run for several minutes before shutdown). I found some earlier posts in this thread discussing the fixed amount of time and the need to allow configuration of a longer fan run time. Is anyone aware of changes in this area? Are others seeing 30-60 second cool down cycles?

Thanks,
DD
post #2656 of 3334
What I never understood is that the projectors shutdown so fast.
I had this with the W8D, TW6000W, and the TW9000W.
Probably, the lamp isn't that hot at all, and the space won't get hotter when the lamp is turned off, so the projector can be turned off that soon.

The air blowing and long time before the light goes On,... I see this also on my Epson W8D.
So probably this isn't an issue at all, but supose to work like that.

Maybe the projector wants to blow out the dirt that might flew in the airway when not in use for a while???

Any info on the newer models in this matter?
post #2657 of 3334
For anyone in Canada, both BestBuy and Future Shop are selling the Sony PS3 glasses for $19.99 per pair. I just bough four more pairs. I was told that BB and FS bought out all of what Sony had, since the glasses and the PS3 24" 3D display (which was what these glasses were mainly market with) aren't supported any longer by Sony.

Here's are a couple of links for those who might want to get more glasses for the Epson projectors:

http://www.futureshop.ca/en-CA/product/playstation-3-sony-ps3-3d-glasses-99021/10183192.aspx?path=4e1663147e7e4ff058b4ebb408c1054den02

http://www.bestbuy.ca/en-CA/product/playstation-3-sony-playstation-3-3d-glasses-99021/10183192.aspx?path=24c9a52b4d42d9dd9ffab01e77292613en02

Great deal, considering how well they work with my 5020.

Ian
post #2658 of 3334
How bright is 3D with this glasses, compared to the origenals Epsons that came with the projector?
Are this IR and RF glasses?
post #2659 of 3334

My PS3's are abuut the same brightness...no real difference IMHO....they are IR same as original of course.

post #2660 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by teeger View Post

Great deal, considering how well they work with my 5020.
Ian
Than you mean 5010?
TW5020.is RF. wink.gif

$19,95 is incredible cheap for 3D glasses that also can be recharged by USB.
post #2661 of 3334
They are slightly dimmer. Not a deal breaker though. For me and my son thought, they really hurt our noses. No way in the world I would pick them over the epson glasses.
post #2662 of 3334
Okey, and the Epsons are just good for 1 movie at the time.
So not for me than.
post #2663 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by toofast68 View Post

My PS3's are abuut the same brightness...no real difference IMHO....they are IR same as original of course.

+1

My experience as well. Epson 3010.

Ed
post #2664 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthieu View Post

Than you mean 5010?
TW5020.is RF. wink.gif
$19,95 is incredible cheap for 3D glasses that also can be recharged by USB.

My bad, I meant to say the 5010 NOT the 5020 - I don't have the 5020 (which as you point out works with RF not IR).

I guess everyone is different in terms of how glasses fit. I have both the Epson and the Sony PS3 glasses - and both have the same comfort level when when wearing either pair over a couple of movies. I do have to say that the Epson are just a touch brighter than the Sony's. But it's easy to compensate for by cranking the brightness just a tad if needed - I rarely need to.

I do like the rechargeable nature of the Sony's over having to replace the button battery with the Epson's. Every-now-and-again I'll simply put the Sony's on change (using a USB port on my PC) for about 30 mins. to top-up the charge.

I'd rather have a bunch of the cheaper glasses at $20.00 for both my use and guests -- if a pair or two breaks over time, it's not that big a deal. Both the Sony's and Epson seem about equally delicate, so I like to hedge my bets with the cheaper glasses.

One 3D title that has more ghosting (on both my Epson and Samsung plasma) is Hugo. The Sony glasses on my Epson offer better 3D performance by a long shot . . . some of the cross-talk (but not all) I can see wearing the Epson glasses offers a clean image free of ghosting or cross-talk when viewing with the Sony PS3 glasses.

Ian
post #2665 of 3334
Thanks for sharing.
You're right about glasses for having friends over.
I'm not even sure if they cn keep their hands of from the glas.
Children always want to feel, and stick their fingers in it.
post #2666 of 3334
I picked up a few pairs of the PS3 glasses as well (running the 6010 and also have the Epson glasses).

I concur with the earlier comments. The Sony PS3 glasses are slightly dimmer than the Epson glasses.

They are also smaller and a better fit for children. and it's a matter of personal preference if they feel better for adults. I suggest walking to the PS3 section as they usually have a console running with a 3D game (and glasses) so you can try them on and see if you like the fit.

Not to mention at $19.99 I don't care as much if a kid breaks a pair..
post #2667 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by teeger View Post

Thanks guys. If the green start up and dimmer image is normal, I'm happy to hear that this is normal.
Ian

Mine has had the green start up screen out of the box. I've had it 4 months or so.
post #2668 of 3334
I just purchased a 5010e. I have it running in ECO mode with the brightness set to -7. After 1 to 2 hours of use the fan goes into high speed. I have it mounted on a shelf on the back wall. There is nothing blocking the vents. There is plenty of space to the sides and top.

Is it typical for the fan to speed up after a few hours?

Thanks,
Dan
post #2669 of 3334
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbldaz View Post

I just purchased a 5010e. I have it running in ECO mode with the brightness set to -7. After 1 to 2 hours of use the fan goes into high speed. I have it mounted on a shelf on the back wall. There is nothing blocking the vents. There is plenty of space to the sides and top.
Is it typical for the fan to speed up after a few hours?
Thanks,
Dan
My 5010 is suspended from ceiling upside-down, I never saw fan go high-speed while in eco mode.
post #2670 of 3334
For those concerned with PS3 glass comfort level, the nose pinch is very adjustable and can be bent backwards to fit the most comfortable spot on nose bridge. I discovered this few days later after my purchase. Since then, I have made my PS3 glasses really comfortable to wear.
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