or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › Local HDTV Info and Reception › Greensboro, NC - HDTV
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Greensboro, NC - HDTV - Page 351

post #10501 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevester23 View Post

8.2 is now working for me as well on D*

It looks like I got new software pushed to my receiver right b4 Christmas so that might have something to do with it.

Which receiver do you have?
post #10502 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevester23 View Post

8.2 is now working for me as well on D*

Still no joy here with my HR24 and AM21
post #10503 of 11121
Walltenna versus Mohu Leaf

I am curious as to whether anyone on here has done a direct comparison of the Walltenna versus the Mohu Leaf? At the same location, I would expect the results to be very similar if not identical when comparing these two antennas. But here's what I really want to know.....

Mohu now has the so called Leaf Ultimate Antenna. And they claim a coverage area up to 50 miles with this amplified version. Again, we know results will always vary based on location. But given the same environment, can anyone comment on the Leaf Ultimate versus the standard Leaf antenna and/or Walltenna?
post #10504 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by evan237 View Post

Walltenna versus Mohu Leaf

I am curious as to whether anyone on here has done a direct comparison of the Walltenna versus the Mohu Leaf? At the same location, I would expect the results to be very similar if not identical when comparing these two antennas. But here's what I really want to know.....

Mohu now has the so called Leaf Ultimate Antenna. And they claim a coverage area up to 50 miles with this amplified version. Again, we know results will always vary based on location. But given the same environment, can anyone comment on the Leaf Ultimate versus the standard Leaf antenna and/or Walltenna?

See http://www.hdtvexpert.com/?p=2279 for test results
post #10505 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by evan237 View Post

Walltenna versus Mohu Leaf

I am curious as to whether anyone on here has done a direct comparison of the Walltenna versus the Mohu Leaf? At the same location, I would expect the results to be very similar if not identical when comparing these two antennas. But here's what I really want to know.....

Mohu now has the so called Leaf Ultimate Antenna. And they claim a coverage area up to 50 miles with this amplified version. Again, we know results will always vary based on location. But given the same environment, can anyone comment on the Leaf Ultimate versus the standard Leaf antenna and/or Walltenna?
The Mohu Leaf and the Walltenna appear to be very similar, although Mohu claims a patent pending design inspired by work with the military. Interestingly, Mohu is made in Raleigh and Walltenna in Greensboro. And sometimes amps help; sometimes they do more harm than good. You could always get a Walltenna and add an amp if necessary, although that new Mohu Ultimate may indeed perform very well, but it is a bit pricey. But it reportedly has a very good low noise amp with filtering, according to their description.
post #10506 of 11121
I just realized tonight that Julie Luck was gone from WGHP. After seeing a promo that mentioned Katie, I checked the web and found that she left in September. I saw a mention that a search for her replacement would be started. Anyone know if that's still going to happen or if Katie is it?
post #10507 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTarHeel View Post

I just realized tonight that Julie Luck was gone from WGHP. After seeing a promo that mentioned Katie, I checked the web and found that she left in September. I saw a mention that a search for her replacement would be started. Anyone know if that's still going to happen or if Katie is it?

Katie is it. Julie Luck is now working at WFMY as an "off air producer" but I'd image that whenever the no compete agreement runs out she'll be on air in some shape or form.
post #10508 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTarHeel View Post

I saw a mention that a search for her replacement would be started. Anyone know if that's still going to happen

The search ran for four months with people from all over considered.
post #10509 of 11121
Several months ago we talked about the NASA Apollo field sequential color cameras. I just ran across this manual for the cameras on line. It is the 1971 version.

http://www.earlytelevision.org/pdf/WEC-ColorTV-Manual.pdf


Here are links to a 2009 series of articles in TV Technology on the development of the camera that sent the pictures of Neil Armstrong setting foot on the Moon.

http://www.tvtechnology.com/feature-box/0124/tvs-longest-remote/202657

http://www.tvtechnology.com/feature-box/0124/equipping-apollo-for-color-television/202793

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/newbay/tvt_20090805/#/0
Edited by foxeng - 1/17/13 at 3:27pm
post #10510 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post

Several months ago we talked about the NASA Apollo field sequential color cameras. I just ran across this manual for the cameras on line. It is the 1971 version.

http://www.earlytelevision.org/pdf/WEC-ColorTV-Manual.pdf


Here are links to a 2009 series of articles in TV Technology on the development of the camera that sent the pictures of Neil Armstrong setting foot on the Moon.

http://www.tvtechnology.com/feature-box/0124/tvs-longest-remote/202657

http://www.tvtechnology.com/feature-box/0124/equipping-apollo-for-color-television/202793

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/newbay/tvt_20090805/#/0

COOL
post #10511 of 11121
I wish the ACC Network would stay put! It's been on Fox 8 (football), ABC45, My48, and now WFMY (basketball) just this school year on the Triad stations. You'd think it would just stay on ABC/My since they don't have other things in the way. I hope WRAL stays with CBS so the Oregon game will be watchable. They've got ACC Network on Fox50.
post #10512 of 11121
WBTV carried the CBS Oregon game and the ACC game was on WMYT-55.1. Sometimes if 3.1 doesn't carry the ACC game it will also be on WJZY 46.1. Also WLOS-13 or WMYA-40 will carry the ACC games. Today's ACC game was on My40. So these ACC telecasts seem to get shifted around in all markets.
post #10513 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by ejb1980 View Post

I wish the ACC Network would stay put! It's been on Fox 8 (football), ABC45, My48, and now WFMY (basketball) just this school year on the Triad stations. You'd think it would just stay on ABC/My since they don't have other things in the way. I hope WRAL stays with CBS so the Oregon game will be watchable. They've got ACC Network on Fox50.

WFMY did put the regular CBS games on 2.2 in SD but the PQ was terrible. As soon as the players started moving the pixelation was awful
post #10514 of 11121
Anyone else start getting 8.2 with the AM 21 on DirecTV yet? Still nothing here...
post #10515 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTarHeel View Post

Anyone else start getting 8.2 with the AM 21 on DirecTV yet? Still nothing here...

Unless you have one of the new D* boxes that runs a real channel scan thru the AM21, you'll only get those sub-channels that D* transmits guide data for. I think it's been a year or two since d* stopped adding new sub-channels to their guides.
post #10516 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

Unless you have one of the new D* boxes that runs a real channel scan thru the AM21, you'll only get those sub-channels that D* transmits guide data for..

They do transmit the correct guide data but there's a glitch somewhere in their system that points to an incorrect signal or channel.
post #10517 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncrules View Post

WFMY did put the regular CBS games on 2.2 in SD but the PQ was terrible. As soon as the players started moving the pixelation was awful

In response to this, Directv added channels 728 and 729 labeled as "CBS Basketball HD" and one channel shows the WVU game and the other showed the Kansas/Texas game. The Kansas game was shown, in glorious HD, even though WRAL was also showing the game in HD. The WVU game was blacked out on ch 728, and only viewable through that mess on 2-2. I realize it's because of WFMY and DMA lines yadda yadda but you'd think common sense would kick in here... WFMY chose to suck. Show both games on the "Alt" channels.

As for Directv and 8-2, mine started working on my HR24-500 when I downloaded the Cutting-Edge software a few weeks ago. I like it, it's a pretty cool program. I had the black guide weeks before it started to roll out nationally. There is more information on this program here:

http://www.satelliteguys.us/threads/149732-DirecTV-Cutting-Edge-Program-Terms-FAQ-How-To-Hidden-Features-and-More
post #10518 of 11121
TV Notes
Audio post industry not entirely on board with CALM Act
The creative part of the commercial industry has balked at having any elements of their ads regulated by the government.

By Michael Grotticellit, Broadcast Engineering Jan 21, 2013

Now that the CALM Act is mandate and enforcement has theoretically begun, the “perceived loudness” of advertising spots on television should be generally acceptable to most viewers. Getting there, however, has been far from easy at this point.

For the most part, stations have spent the effort (and money) to implement safeguards that ensure proper audio levels, as mandated in the CALM Act. As a recent example, Fisher Communications' 13 local stations are now deploying Monitor IQ audio measurement technology from Digital Nirvana. Monitor IQ provides Web-based, HD/SD channel monitoring, logging, compliance and diagnostics/QC, as well as archiving of content recordings for up to 90 days.

Lee Wood, regional director of engineering for Fisher Communications (in Seattle, WA) said the stations will use Monitor IQ for regulatory compliance and loudness monitoring of its off-air HD and SD DTV channels.

So, monitoring the outgoing program stream is critical. But what about the content coming into a station? Station engineers have said that the audio levels of the original commercial spots and other content being ingested on a daily basis are all over the spectrum. Indeed, there are probably as many ways of monitoring and adjusting audio levels as there are professional mixers tasked with doing it. That breeds confusion. Add to that the general perception across the advertising community that loudness is really someone else’s issue, namely the local stations and cable TV outlets that distribute it, and you begin to see broadcasters’ concern. They are the ones that risk being fined by the FCC, not the original content creator.

After speaking with companies that deliver ads electronically to stations — in the form of a digital file — you get the impression that there is still much work to be done to get all of those involved with mixing the original piece to readily comply with the law and provide content that does not have to be adjusted at the station before broadcast.

Creative community resisting CALM

“The audio post houses don’t seem to have their hands around this yet,” said Wayne Dykes, CEO of SpotGenie, a digital advertising delivery service in Atlanta, GA. “We get spots quite frequently that are not compliant with the CALM Act, and we either try to auto-fix them ourselves or, if time permits, we kick it back. But if we’re up against an airdate, we have to fix it ourselves, which brings up a number of creative issues.”

Indeed, the creative part of the commercial industry has balked at having any elements of their ads regulated by the government. Before President Obama signed the CALM Act into law (in 2010), the ad community lobbied against mandated audio levels. Apparently, creatives are not good at adhering to rules.

“I know the deadline has come and past for the CALM Act to be enforced, but we still see some people dragging their heels and not doing anything differently,” Dykes said. “You have to remember that the audio post house is trying to impress their client in the mixing suite, so the higher level is key to a good listening experience. Once the client approves the spot, the post house feels its job is done and sends it along down the chain for someone else to worry about.”

Passing the buck appears to be the prevailing strategy, since the FCC has stated that the entity that delivers the spot is the one that will be fined if viewers complain. If professional mixers are following the -10db spec that the industry has always adhered to, it can easily be fixed to comply with the -24 LKFS spec mandated as part of the CALM Act. Yet Dykes said he regularly sees local and national spot audio levels a lot higher than that.

“I think producers are starting to understand that if their levels are way out of spec, someone along the broadcast chain is going to squash that audio to make it compliant, and that compromises the integrity of that ad,” said Robert Haskitt, chief marketing officer at Extreme Reach, a spot deliver and measurement company in New York City. “No one wants to risk a fine by the government. So, what we would prefer is to have a conversation with a broadcaster to make sure everyone’s goals are met. We never want to miss an air date because the audio level is too high.”

Extreme Reach regularly works with more than 1000 post-production houses around the country and finds audio levels are all over the place. At this point, Haskitt said, most are compliant, but 15 to 20 percent need some type of audio fix. Some ads go directly from an editor’s workstation at a post house to a cloud-based server operated by Extreme Reach and then on to the final broadcast outlet. This can happen within minutes. Other times, an ad has to be remixed, which takes extra time and money.

Automated spot checks are key

“When it comes to audio levels, our spec is based on the CALM Act,” Haskitt said. “Up until the last year, we have been monitoring peak levels and reporting if they exceeded a certain level. The CALM Act is more about the average level across commercials [LKFS]. As everyone has been trying to work on ways to keep content compliant, we have been able to implement automated spec checks to make sure the audio level meet the spec of -24 LKFS (that is, Loudness, K-weighted, relative to Full Scale, a loudness standard designed to enable normalization of audio levels for the delivery of broadcast TV and other video). If it does not, Extreme Reach will try to fix it on a minor level (within +/- 2db). If it falls out of that spec, our system can adjust it, but if it’s nowhere close, we push it back to the post house for additional mixing. We don't want to step in someone’s creative vision, so it’s a good policy to let the post house fix it before it is broadcast.”

SpotGenie also works with thousands of post houses (and serves ads to some 3000 broadcast and cable outlets) and can fix minor problems automatically with transcoding technology like Rhozet’s Carbon Coder and Telestream’s FlipFactory. The company uses proprietary software to QC all files as they come into its facility and alert them to problems with either the video or audio levels.

“Either we fix it or the station does,” Haskitt said. “However, in applying these auto fixes, we have seen cases where it definitely affects the original mix.”

They recently had a client that advertised during the BCS college national championship game. The client heard its spots on-air during the ESPN broadcast and called Extreme Reach to complain. They said the mix sounded differently than it had in the studio. Haskitt said they explained that this is common after a spot goes through the broadcast chain. The client wound up spending the time and money to remix the spots because they felt it didn’t meet its creative goals.

Achieving creative goals while remaining compliant with the law

“Not everyone is willing to do that,” SpotGenie’s Dykes said. “If the audio mixers don't do it right, they think the broadcaster will fix it. So, that’s why I think the audio post industry has to do a better job of educating its members about how to achieve your creative goals while also remaining compliant with the law.”

SpotGenie also has a sister audio post-production company called Acoustic Music, in Atlanta, so Dykes sees what’s happen in the mixing suite firsthand. He said there’s still work to be done.

“I don't think that many audio engineers that mix commercials have gotten as serious about the issue as they should,” he said. “There was never a law before. Now the CALM Act, combined with the risk that a spot will get kicked back by the client, are good reasons to pay attention to the final mix levels. I think it will work itself out and everyone will eventually become compliant. The audio mixers also need to understand that if an audio level needs to be compressed, it’s better for the post house to do it than the broadcaster (who does not have as much invested in that spot). The CALM Act has allowed audio mixers to have more control over the final listening experience because now the exact spec they should mix to. If they don't mix to that spec, their spot might be compromised down the line.”

The biggest hurdle is reaching industry consensus, in spite of the law. Commercials are produced from different sources with different workflows and wide-ranging creative decision makers. The methods of mixing are equally diverse. Getting everyone to understand the importance of compliance at the creative level is key. Broadcasters have done (and continue to do) their part.

“Different advertisers have different perspectives,” Extreme Reach’s Haskitt said. “We’ve heard some advertisers saying they don't want to be regulated as far as how the ad runs. As we all can surmise, advertisers love their spots to run hot [loud]. Other advertisers understand that the audience gets annoyed when a spot is too loud, and so that viewer either turns down the audio level or walks away from the TV. Theses are two scenarios that advertisers fear the most. So, many feel that if you want your spot to be seen, you should make it compatible with what the government has decided viewers can tolerate. It’s really that simple.”

http://broadcastengineering.com/processing/audio-post-industry-not-entirely-board-calm-act
Edited by foxeng - 1/21/13 at 9:25am
post #10519 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by ejb1980 View Post

In response to this, Directv added channels 728 and 729 labeled as "CBS Basketball HD" and one channel shows the WVU game and the other showed the Kansas/Texas game. The Kansas game was shown, in glorious HD, even though WRAL was also showing the game in HD. The WVU game was blacked out on ch 728, and only viewable through that mess on 2-2. I realize it's because of WFMY and DMA lines yadda yadda but you'd think common sense would kick in here... WFMY chose to suck. Show both games on the "Alt" channels.

As for Directv and 8-2, mine started working on my HR24-500 when I downloaded the Cutting-Edge software a few weeks ago. I like it, it's a pretty cool program. I had the black guide weeks before it started to roll out nationally. There is more information on this program here:

http://www.satelliteguys.us/threads/149732-DirecTV-Cutting-Edge-Program-Terms-FAQ-How-To-Hidden-Features-and-More

I guess this is why I can get 8.2 on my HR24/200. I didnt think about it before.

I have done Cutting Edge thru DBStalk.

My guess is when DTV sends out the next National Release update everyone should be able to receive 8.2.

However, I still cannot get my AM21 to load 20.4 info. into my guide.
post #10520 of 11121
The CE thru DBS and SatGuys is the same software, in case there was any question. You won't get 20-4, 43-3, or 43-4 unless you have the HR34 Genie receiver.
post #10521 of 11121
I recently purchased the Leaf Ultimate antenna for a guest bedroom. I don't believe in 'miracle' little antennas when compared to their much bigger counterparts. And I don't think the Mohu is any exception. But having said that, it does offer impressive results for such a small size. And I am not aware of a better alternative among small indoor antennas. For example, I recently tried a ClearStream Micron from Antennas Direct, and it was easily outdone by the Mohu Leaf. And because of the design of the Mohu Leaf, it is easy to experiment with the placement of this antenna moreso than a settop indoor antenna model.

Most people in the Triad are probably aware that the majority of the local broadcast towers are south of Greensboro in the Level Cross/Sophia area. This allows viewers in High Point and Greensboro to view these channels OTA with less effort versus others (such as myself) in Winston. But with the proper placement of the Mohu, I was able to pull in all of the Triad stations (in a ground level bedroom) with just a little experimentation. And I have enough signal strength (even on the weaker stations) to maintain them even with changing weather conditions.

The price is a bit steep. But if a viewer wants OTA with very little effort, I think this antenna is worth checking out.
post #10522 of 11121
It may help reception results since you have the new amplified version. It supposedly has a very good low noise amplifier. And the sleek, discreet design of this antenna makes it aesthetically pleasing and easy to work with.
post #10523 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by evan237 View Post

I recently purchased the Leaf Ultimate antenna for a guest bedroom. I don't believe in 'miracle' little antennas when compared to their much bigger counterparts. And I don't think the Mohu is any exception. But having said that, it does offer impressive results for such a small size. And I am not aware of a better alternative among small indoor antennas. For example, I recently tried a ClearStream Micron from Antennas Direct, and it was easily outdone by the Mohu Leaf. And because of the design of the Mohu Leaf, it is easy to experiment with the placement of this antenna moreso than a settop indoor antenna model.

Most people in the Triad are probably aware that the majority of the local broadcast towers are south of Greensboro in the Level Cross/Sophia area. This allows viewers in High Point and Greensboro to view these channels OTA with less effort versus others (such as myself) in Winston. But with the proper placement of the Mohu, I was able to pull in all of the Triad stations (in a ground level bedroom) with just a little experimentation. And I have enough signal strength (even on the weaker stations) to maintain them even with changing weather conditions.

The price is a bit steep. But if a viewer wants OTA with very little effort, I think this antenna is worth checking out.

 

I'm glad to hear that there is another good indoor antenna on the market.

I have had pretty good success with the amplified ClearStream Micron, though I do occasionally have some breakups that I think may be due to multipath interference. Mine is an older model that does not have the reflector.

post #10524 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post

I'm glad to hear that there is another good indoor antenna on the market.
I have had pretty good success with the amplified ClearStream Micron, though I do occasionally have some breakups that I think may be due to multipath interference. Mine is an older model that does not have the reflector.

I'm glad you've had good success with the amplified ClearStream Micron. Even though my experience with the Micron was not as good as the Leaf Ultimate (comparing both antennas in the same location), I don't have a problem with Antennas Direct (in general). In fact, I've got a ClearStream 4 that I bought from Antennas Direct a couple of years ago. This antenna is inside my attic; and I use it for another TV. It performs almost as well as my outdoor Winegard 9095P. (I have 3 TVs and have a separate antenna for each one of them). These antennas include my outdoor Winegard 9095p, a Clearstream 4 in the attic, and now my Leaf Ultimate.
post #10525 of 11121
Interesting that Fox TV sold WGHP a few years back, but now they are returning to NC with the pending purchase of WJZY/WMYT in Charlotte. But by all accounts, they apparently were a very good operator of Channel 8, so hopefully the same will hold true for 46. But a loss nonetheless for WCCB Channel 18, and it will be interesting indeed to see what happens there.
post #10526 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerSC View Post

Interesting that Fox TV sold WGHP a few years back, but now they are returning to NC with the pending purchase of WJZY/WMYT in Charlotte. But by all accounts, they apparently were a very good operator of Channel 8, so hopefully the same will hold true for 46. But a loss nonetheless for WCCB Channel 18, and it will be interesting indeed to see what happens there.

FOX is into duopolies. In our market size, only one duopoly is allowed and Sinclair has that with WXLV and WMYV. That was the main reason for selling the 8 stations (including WGHP) in 2008. FOX did like this market and I suspect had a duopoly been available here, WGHP would not have been sold. We had been hearing for several years that FOX was looking at coming back into the state, but only when the money made sense. If the reports are true that Capital sold the stations for $18 million, then FOX got a steal. There is also thought within the industry that Capital did the sale to save the FOX affiliation on WRAZ. FOX has an option (that expires in March if I remember correctly) with Sinclair on stations in three markets, Raleigh being one of them. Had FOX exercised the options for WLFL and WRDC, WRAZ would have lost FOX and be in the situation that WCCB is in now.

What FOX does with WJZY and WMYT is a total unknown. FOX does own some smaller stations like WOGX Ocala, Florida that is run out of WOFL Orlando and the just sold WUTB Baltimore was run out of WWOR, Secacus, NJ. Does WJZY and WMYT go the way of WOGX and WUTB? Who knows? Time will tell.
post #10527 of 11121
I did not live in the Triad in 1995, but I understand WGHP moved away from ABC and became affiliated with Fox at that time. In the mid 1990's, I wonder how the change from ABC to Fox impacted the number of viewers? At that time, I was thinking ABC was still a stronger network verus the still very young Fox network. But regardless of affiliation changes, WGHP has always had a very strong local news product in the Triad.
post #10528 of 11121
Quote:
Originally Posted by evan237 View Post

I did not live in the Triad in 1995, but I understand WGHP moved away from ABC and became affiliated with Fox at that time. In the mid 1990's, I wonder how the change from ABC to Fox impacted the number of viewers? At that time, I was thinking ABC was still a stronger network verus the still very young Fox network. But regardless of affiliation changes, WGHP has always had a very strong local news product in the Triad.

The first year after the network affiliation swap in 1995 (FOX purchased the station in 1995) there was a small drop off of viewers to WGHP. Within a short time, it became obvious to viewers that WXLV as an ABC affiliate was much weaker than WGHP as an ABC affiliate and viewers came back to WGHP. Over the last 15 years, on many, many, many occasions over the affiliation period with FOX, WGHP has had the number 1 10 pm newscast of all the FOX affiliates nationwide (that is the only newscast FOX tracks). Up to the time of the network affiliate swap in 1995, WGHP had the only successful network affiliate swap of all the stations that FOX bought at the time and changed networks on. WBRC in Birmingham, AL switched after WGHP and used some of the same tactics and also had a successful swap. Some stations, which had been number one in their markets fell to number four and some have never completely recovered where others have done quite nicely.

ABC has shopped the network to WFMY and WXII on several occasions over the last 15 years or so with no luck. WXLV over its entire affiliation with ABC has never led in the market more than a network show here or there. As far as news goes, all three times WXLV has attempted to mount a local newscast, it was never a factor in the market. The current news agreement with TWC for News14 is more to keep ABC from pulling the affiliation than anything to do with ratings since the ratings for their newscasts are a very distant 4th place. It has never been and continues to be a non factor in the market.

For the last 15 years or so, WGHP, WFMY and WXII stay in a constant battle with each other never too far away from each other in ratings in news and sign on to sign off ratings with all three stations being able to claim number 1 over that time period at various times. The news market continues to be dog eat dog brutal to this day between WGHP, WFMY, WXII. At this time, WGHP offers the most locally produced news daily of any station in North Carolina with 8 1/2 hours of locally produced news with 5 1/2 hours just in the mornings alone.

Just because a station has a legacy network like ABC, CBS or NBC doesn't mean they have viewers. There are lots of things that go into that. Here ABC isn't very strong. You go to Raleigh/Durham or Charlotte and ABC is very strong where NBC isn't so strong in those markets but NBC is strong here.
Edited by foxeng - 1/30/13 at 9:15pm
post #10529 of 11121
The ratings among the big 4 networks change so much, it's difficult for me to keep up with who is in the lead at any particular time. And then there's rating statistics for certain demographics, whether it's on a national level or local. But regardless of which big 4 network is leading the horse race, I would suspect WGHP to remain successful as a result of its continued success in producing local news in the Piedmont Triad. I have not read any recent statistics, but if I had to guess, I would say WGHP must be in first place (for Triad local news), followed by WXII, and then WFMY. Because WXLV doesn't even produce their own news, I don't think they can even qualify for a fourth place. One interesting thing about the Fox affiliation, it allows WGHP to air the late night news at 10pm versus 11pm. And I would presume this is a market niche as there are many people who don't want to stay up for the 11pm news. But as stated by FoxEng, ABC is very strong in Charlotte and Raleigh/Durham. If I am not mistaken, WSOC (as an ABC affiliate) holds the overall lead in the Charlotte market.
post #10530 of 11121
ABC gets good ratings for GMA and World News on WSOC. But here in GVL, SC, NBC is strong on WYFF4, and WSPA does well with CBS. But most WLOS viewers are in Western NC mountains, being a split market.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Local HDTV Info and Reception
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › Local HDTV Info and Reception › Greensboro, NC - HDTV