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basementdweller1's "subbin' it out" basement theater & more build - Page 2

post #31 of 128
Subscribed.
Looks great. Appreciate the conversation around Radon. Cleaning out my basement to start some of the crack sealing etc... forgot about the consideration for active Radon removal. Mine is passive today. I'll test it out before we start framing.
post #32 of 128
Thread Starter 
Upgrading that passive system to an active should cost less than $400, or even $150 if you do it yourself. Nice the builder put it in but it's a sign other homes in the area may be reading, wise to test.
post #33 of 128
Thread Starter 
A few questions to start the flood...

1. Looking at my space how would you build the riser.... Should it freestand in the center of the theater space or connect to the outside wall? If I freestand it, how do I handle electric for the chairs short of having cables across from the riser to the wall... Tripping hazard, looks bad etc.? The space is about 14 ft, 8 inches wide and I likely will have a 3 person couch row, 3 theater seat row (on riser) but want to build to support 4 seats which I have room for.

2. Talk to me about Cat6. I know common wisdom is when the walls are open run Cat5 or Cat6 everywhere and in number. I see some are saying anywhere from 4 to 7 lines PER ROOM. My home is a 5 year old builder community home with zero cat5/6 run anywhere upstairs but with wifi I have to tell you I haven't really missed anything so far, at least I don't know what I've been missing. I get the importance of running Cat6 from my main level office router down to the av closet, I get how nice it will be to hardwire Cat6 to any av device in the rack that accepts it, as well as my PJ and 2 flat panels tvs but with a wifi extender in the closet for portable devices throughout the basement what is the advantage of wall jackpoints throughout the basement? It still doesn't explain the need reasons for so many lines to each room, I vaguely understand the other uses of Ethernet for telephone, HDMI extenders etc. but that is a mystery to me so do I just leave the unused lines loose in a mud ring behind the wall for future use or they all terminate in a wall plate? I know how vague my question is but my understanding of the uses of Cat6 beyond plugging in computers and routers is also just that vague. Thanks!
post #34 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by basementdweller1 View Post

A few questions to start the flood...

.

2. Talk to me about Cat6. I know common wisdom is when the walls are open run Cat5 or Cat6 everywhere and in number. I see some are saying anywhere from 4 to 7 lines PER ROOM. My home is a 5 year old builder community home with zero cat5/6 run anywhere upstairs but with wifi I have to tell you I haven't really missed anything so far, at least I don't know what I've been missing. I get the importance of running Cat6 from my main level office router down to the av closet, I get how nice it will be to hardwire Cat6 to any av device in the rack that accepts it, as well as my PJ and 2 flat panels tvs but with a wifi extender in the closet for portable devices throughout the basement what is the advantage of wall jackpoints throughout the basement? It still doesn't explain the need reasons for so many lines to each room, I vaguely understand the other uses of Ethernet for telephone, HDMI extenders etc. but that is a mystery to me so do I just leave the unused lines loose in a mud ring behind the wall for future use or they all terminate in a wall plate? I know how vague my question is but my understanding of the uses of Cat6 beyond plugging in computers and routers is also just that vague. Thanks!

4-7 lines per room seems excessive to me. I ran 2 Cat 6 lines to each room along with one RG6. I also ran 2 Cat6 and an HDMI cable to my projector from the AV rack. I also used 2" smurf tube from the projector area to the AV rack in case I need to pull any future cables. But as you said the future will be faster wireless. I really question 4-7 lines also. Just seems like overkill and Cat6 is not free.
post #35 of 128
Thread Starter 
Where did you get 2" smurf tube from, a quick peak last week at Home Depot showed they only stock 3/4". Did you special order it online or do any big box or smaller hardware stores have it locally? Thanks... I have to use smurf tube for future proofing, the city won't let me run PVC chases.
post #36 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by basementdweller1 View Post

Where did you get 2" smurf tube from, a quick peak last week at Home Depot showed they only stock 3/4". Did you special order it online or do any big box or smaller hardware stores have it locally? Thanks... I have to use smurf tube for future proofing, the city won't let me run PVC chases.

My electrician ordered it from his electrical supply store. It was cheaper this way since he just put it on his account. I could not find 2" at any of my local building supply chains either. The 2" is pretty easy to work with and you can get a lot of cabling through it easily.
post #37 of 128
Thread Starter 
Plumbing rough will be done this Sunday and I'm taking electrical bids all this week and next, hope they can start work by the last week in January and I can be ready for rough inspection by mid-Feb.

1. Still hoping some of you can chime in on the riser... how high... 7" vs 12"? Square and free standing in the room or asymmetric and attached to the wall to run electric? PS: I just saw the riser height calculator, I'll try that, but an rules of thumb...?

2. Row distance? I know it all depends on seating choice but what is the typical distance between rows with the 18" of walkway space and room to extend a theater seat? For example if my front row is at 11' what is the "average" 2nd row at... 14', 15', 16'? Trying to guess how big my riser will be in depth and what screen size will need to be based on using Center Stage XD material from SeymourAV (Chris) and AT screen.

Still more to come...
post #38 of 128
when i built my second row riser in my last house i built it off the specs of the seats i picked. i had limited space so my second row was behind me first row with just enough space for both seats to recline with someone sitting in them without them hitting each other. I made my riser 6" high and was happy with that height, i couldn't have gone higher because of a low ceiling, but i don't think i would have wanted to either.
post #39 of 128
Thread Starter 
Another update, but a better one is coming later tonight or tomorrow on subjects near and dear to our hearts... the rack, wiring, and the theater.

For now, the basement is framed, HVAC rough is in, and plumbing rough is in. I have some pictures of the plumbing rough including my intresting setup for the bar sink...

Here is the bathroom roughed in. Plumbing for the sink is set for the vanity we just bought, a 35 inch one. You can see the plumbing for the bath and shower are in:



Here is the back wall bar cabinetry. No good way to plumb the sink here so the city is letting me use an under sink ejector but the trick was how to plumb it and how to get the vent to connect to a location across the room. The solution was rather than taking up two cabinet spaces below we ran the drain to the storage room where we placed the ejector. Here it goes straight up to the sewer line and the vent (vented within 3' of the sink p-trap and re-vented off the ejector) goes up and over about 5 ft' then turns a 90 and runs along a soffit that exists between the bar space and the theater room until it connects up to the existing vent. We upsized the 1 1/2 in vent off the ejector to 2 in as it runs to the existing vent. Super clean and looks great (ps: the stone sample is the backsplash for the bar and the front face of the bar island):







Today I agreed upon an electrical contractor and I expect rough electrical work to be done the week of Jan 30th. Some snafus have crept up. I totally missed the fact the free standing bar island would require electric by code. No good solutions other than to cut the floor about 3' long and 3" wide and run conduit through the concrete. Since the mess has to be made I budgeted to put electrical not only in the island now (with lighting for the stone work etc.) but also to make a 2nd cut about 2' long and 3" wide to get electrical into the riser to plug the theater seats in. Lemonade from lemons.

Placed my huge order with monoprice today, lots of CAT6, HDMI, RG6, keystone plates, cat6 switches, power bridges, hdmi wall plates and more... my next post will have some floor plans showing lighting layout and low voltage layout and I'll need some help planning some locations and wiring for the theater...

Thanks
post #40 of 128
I'm in IT so I know a couple things about data cabling. You rarely have an opportunity to run cable like this, especially in a residential home. Definitely go with cat6, over cat5e, it can handle gig speeds much better when compared to an average cat5e cable, and will be less prone to magnetic interference since it is better shielded. NO RUN should exceed 100 meters, make sure you test the cabling and all the terminations. L-Comm makes a lot of IT gear for racks, enclosures, patch panels, and such. Don't go with the stuff at your home improvement store, it is limited in capability and over-priced.

You can use the cat6 cable for telephone as well as data, for telephone it is overkill BUT you can run up to 4 voice lines per cat6 run (4 pair of wires in each cat5/6 cable).

Figure N+2 runs per room, N being the number of devices you know you will need now, and add two. for offices, dens, etc, consider putting drops in opposite corners for convenience. Printers, optical players (DVD/Blu-ray), receivers, tvs, DTV boxes, projectors, gaming systems, home security cameras and even thermostats are all are coming with the ability to be on a data network, who knows what's next, lamps? More gear is coming with wireless built in too. You can go crazy, but like I said plain on N+2, and if you need more than that down the line you can always opt for wireless, or a small network switch.

If I had the opportunity to re-wire wire my house for low voltage, I would, and I would make sure that there were more than enough network drops. You can probably find a patch panel and rack mount switch that you can put right in your current rack.
I'm not sure what the difference is between a 4 post rack for AV and a 4 or 2 post rack for data and network equipment, perhaps the hole spacing is different? Data racks are usually 19" wide.
post #41 of 128
Thread Starter 
Here is my low voltage plan (sorry for the camera phone shot):



Going INTO the AV closet:

- RG6 line to DVR cable box

- 2 CAT6 lines (75ft) from upstairs main level router. These will go into a rack mounted unmanaged 24 port switch from monoprice.

Going to theater area from AV closet:

- 25 ft. silver plated high end 1.4 HDMI to projector
- 25 ft. 1.4 HDMI (non-silver) as a backup to projector
- empty 1 inch ENT tube for future video cables to projector
- 2 CAT6 lines to projector
- 5 12 AWG speaker wires to L/C/R (in screen wall) and LS/RS in ceiling.
- 50 ft RCA subwoofer cable to single keystoned RCA jack in the screen wall corner to patch cable to free standing subwoofer in corner of the front corner of the room.

Going to Living room from AV closet:

- 30 ft. HDMI cable to wall mounted tv (using duplex recessed power outlet and low voltage wire port)
- 8 ft. HDMI cable from the wall mounted tv through the wall to a HDMI wall plate at floor level for any future local needs.
- 1 30ft CAT6 cable to wall mounted tv
- 2 50 ft CAT6 cables to 3 port keystone plate at floor level
- 1 RG6 to the 3 port keystone plate at floor level (source will be tagged for future use but not hooked up at electrical panel for now)

Going to bar area:

- Phone line using CAT5E wire (electrician will handle.)

Going to Fitness room from AV closet:

- 30 ft. HDMI cable to wall mounted tv (using duplex recessed power outlet and low voltage wire port)
- 8 ft. HDMI cable from the wall mounted tv through the wall to a HDMI wall plate at floor level for any future local needs.
- 1 30ft CAT6 cable to wall mounted tv
- 2 50 ft CAT6 cables to 3 port keystone plate at floor level
- 1 RG6 to the 3 port keystone plate at floor level (source will be tagged for future use but not hooked up at electrical panel for now)

-----------------------------

So basically, double HDMI to the projector, single HDMI to the two TVs (but they will each have an additional local HDMI source from a wall plate for future use.) 2 CAT6 lines to the projector and 3 CAT6 lines to the living room & fitness rooms split 1 to the TV, 2 to the wall plate. Everything nice and clean with dedicated wall plates etc.

Missing anything?
post #42 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by basementdweller1 View Post

Another update, but a better one is coming later tonight or tomorrow on subjects near and dear to our hearts... the rack, wiring, and the theater.

For now, the basement is framed, HVAC rough is in, and plumbing rough is in. I have some pictures of the plumbing rough including my intresting setup for the bar sink...

Here is the bathroom roughed in. Plumbing for the sink is set for the vanity we just bought, a 35 inch one. You can see the plumbing for the bath and shower are in:

Here is the back wall bar cabinetry. No good way to plumb the sink here so the city is letting me use an under sink ejector but the trick was how to plumb it and how to get the vent to connect to a location across the room. The solution was rather than taking up two cabinet spaces below we ran the drain to the storage room where we placed the ejector. Here it goes straight up to the sewer line and the vent (vented within 3' of the sink p-trap and re-vented off the ejector) goes up and over about 5 ft' then turns a 90 and runs along a soffit that exists between the bar space and the theater room until it connects up to the existing vent. We upsized the 1 1/2 in vent off the ejector to 2 in as it runs to the existing vent. Super clean and looks great (ps: the stone sample is the backsplash for the bar and the front face of the bar island):

Today I agreed upon an electrical contractor and I expect rough electrical work to be done the week of Jan 30th. Some snafus have crept up. I totally missed the fact the free standing bar island would require electric by code. No good solutions other than to cut the floor about 3' long and 3" wide and run conduit through the concrete. Since the mess has to be made I budgeted to put electrical not only in the island now (with lighting for the stone work etc.) but also to make a 2nd cut about 2' long and 3" wide to get electrical into the riser to plug the theater seats in. Lemonade from lemons.

Placed my huge order with monoprice today, lots of CAT6, HDMI, RG6, keystone plates, cat6 switches, power bridges, hdmi wall plates and more... my next post will have some floor plans showing lighting layout and low voltage layout and I'll need some help planning some locations and wiring for the theater...

Thanks

Wow, you are cruising. Nice workaround for the plumbing, sounds like you have a good plumber. Honestly, I think you are smart to follow code and get inspected. My first basement build I did not pull permits and was sweating a little when we sold the house and it was inspection time. In this market, you dont want to give potential buyers a reason to walk (not that you plan on selling). The new house we pulled permits and did all the inspections. It adds cost, and property taxes go up, but everything is done right and we have peace of mind.

Look forward to your electrical updates.
post #43 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by basementdweller1 View Post

Here is my low voltage plan (sorry for the camera phone shot):

Going INTO the AV closet:

- RG6 line to DVR cable box

- 2 CAT6 lines (75ft) from upstairs main level router. These will go into a rack mounted unmanaged 24 port switch from monoprice.

Going to theater area from AV closet:

- 25 ft. silver plated high end 1.4 HDMI to projector
- 25 ft. 1.4 HDMI (non-silver) as a backup to projector
- empty 1 inch ENT tube for future video cables to projector
- 2 CAT6 lines to projector
- 5 12 AWG speaker wires to L/C/R (in screen wall) and LS/RS in ceiling.
- 50 ft RCA subwoofer cable to single keystoned RCA jack in the screen wall corner to patch cable to free standing subwoofer in corner of the front corner of the room.

Going to Living room from AV closet:

- 30 ft. HDMI cable to wall mounted tv (using duplex recessed power outlet and low voltage wire port)
- 8 ft. HDMI cable from the wall mounted tv through the wall to a HDMI wall plate at floor level for any future local needs.
- 1 30ft CAT6 cable to wall mounted tv
- 2 50 ft CAT6 cables to 3 port keystone plate at floor level
- 1 RG6 to the 3 port keystone plate at floor level (source will be tagged for future use but not hooked up at electrical panel for now)

Going to bar area:

- Phone line using CAT5E wire (electrician will handle.)

Going to Fitness room from AV closet:

- 30 ft. HDMI cable to wall mounted tv (using duplex recessed power outlet and low voltage wire port)
- 8 ft. HDMI cable from the wall mounted tv through the wall to a HDMI wall plate at floor level for any future local needs.
- 1 30ft CAT6 cable to wall mounted tv
- 2 50 ft CAT6 cables to 3 port keystone plate at floor level
- 1 RG6 to the 3 port keystone plate at floor level (source will be tagged for future use but not hooked up at electrical panel for now)

-----------------------------

So basically, double HDMI to the projector, single HDMI to the two TVs (but they will each have an additional local HDMI source from a wall plate for future use.) 2 CAT6 lines to the projector and 3 CAT6 lines to the living room & fitness rooms split 1 to the TV, 2 to the wall plate. Everything nice and clean with dedicated wall plates etc.

Missing anything?

Are you using RF, or do you need an IR repeater? I went with an IR repeater from Smart Home. If it was me, I would also cable for an additional subwoofer for the rear of the room. Multiple subs can really balance your bass throughout the room. It is cheap to cable and futureproof now.

Monoprice was a lifesaver. Very good quality for a great price and fast service.
post #44 of 128
Thread Starter 
I will be using a Harmony 1100 with TWO RF repeaters. One will be placed in the hallway opposite the AV rack, the other will be in the main viewing room on a wall shelf placed to hit both the projector and Grafik Eye on the back utility wall. The RF base shoots up and out even without "mini" repeaters connected and has quite a range, I'm counting on them. Works great in a friends house with a similar setup, hoping for the same.
post #45 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by basementdweller1 View Post

I will be using a Harmony 1100 with TWO RF repeaters. One will be placed in the hallway opposite the AV rack, the other will be in the main viewing room on a wall shelf placed to hit both the projector and Grafik Eye on the back utility wall. The RF base shoots up and out even without "mini" repeaters connected and has quite a range, I'm counting on them. Works great in a friends house with a similar setup, hoping for the same.

Sounds like a well thought out plan.
post #46 of 128
Eventually I am hoping to complete a similar project to this. How much did you budget for everything?
post #47 of 128
Thread Starter 
PM sent.
post #48 of 128
Thread Starter 
I'm going to post this over in Speakers too but here is a question. I have an open layout for my theater space and as mentioned no good way to put surround speakers on a wall and issues with space and duct noise for in ceiling so I have to do ON ceiling speakers. With a ceiling height of 7'10" and a riser it can get a big tight. I really want to limit speaker size to shorter than 6" from ceiling height which really compromises everything but I think I have an idea to make lemonade from lemons. I have all along planned a 5.1 system but what if to go along with my Def Tech in wall L/C/R I go with 4 Orb Audio Mod 1s as a 7.1 solution? The Orbs are a good size 4" round, and pretty cheap and I could easily fit two behind the 2nd row on ceiling and two along side the 2 seating rows. Are the little Orbs just going to stink for my biggish open space or is this a good compromise. I am reluctant to use the Mod 2 for size/cost reasons unless I go back to a 5.1 system.

In other news my new onkyo TX-nr809 came!
post #49 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by basementdweller1 View Post

I'm going to post this over in Speakers too but here is a question. I have an open layout for my theater space and as mentioned no good way to put surround speakers on a wall and issues with space and duct noise for in ceiling so I have to do ON ceiling speakers. With a ceiling height of 7'10" and a riser it can get a big tight. I really want to limit speaker size to shorter than 6" from ceiling height which really compromises everything but I think I have an idea to make lemonade from lemons. I have all along planned a 5.1 system but what if to go along with my Def Tech in wall L/C/R I go with 4 Orb Audio Mod 1s as a 7.1 solution? The Orbs are a good size 4" round, and pretty cheap and I could easily fit two behind the 2nd row on ceiling and two along side the 2 seating rows. Are the little Orbs just going to stink for my biggish open space or is this a good compromise. I am reluctant to use the Mod 2 for size/cost reasons unless I go back to a 5.1 system.

In other news my new onkyo TX-nr809 came!

Are your ducts in the way, or do you not have the room for in-ceiling? I don't think duct noise would be an issue if:
- You buy an enclosed speaker and add insulation around it (I used R-19 throughout my ceiling)
- You consider the role of surround speakers. They handle mostly ambient sounds and do not handle low frequency bass. I have had in-ceiling surrounds in several houses now and it has never been an issue for noise. If you are really concerned you could build MDF boxes with green glue and then put them in the ceiling with the enclosed speaker. You are much more likely to have higher frequency sound from your main speakers or bass from your subwoofer being heard from above than your surrounds.

If in-ceiling is out of the question, the orbs seem like a viable solution. I have never heard them.
post #50 of 128
Thread Starter 
The left side surround and left rear would need to fit in a channel only about 7 inches wide with a duct on one side. The only speakers I can find to go in ceiling at that size are more purposes for general music with lots placed around a ceiling as opposed to a purpose built ceiling surround more in the 10X10 or 12x12 size. Further even a tiny speaker would be right up against a duct with little room for insulation. The orbs look like a reasonable solution just wondering if I should spring for the Mod2. I could always go mod 1 and upgrade later it looks like.
post #51 of 128
Thread Starter 
Because I have no patience I ordered 4 Mod1's I can always upgrade later but now I will running 7.1 system. I got the hammered earth finish which should go with the browns/greens/yellows pallet we expect to use in the basement.

post #52 of 128
Thread Starter 
Ok... two silly (and I actually mean stupid) questions...

1. When I have 2 rows of seating where do I place the side surrounds in a 7.1 system. Even with the front row? In between the two rows? Or even with the back row? Never had a 7.1 setup before. I know the rears go behind the listening positions in a 7.1 so at least I have the part figured out...

2. Ok this is really dumb but here goes. I am going to have a drywall ceiling. The ceiling will be prewired for the 7.1 system. When I have the drywallers put up the ceiling in a month or so how do I get them to accurately place the hole to pull the speaker wire through so my on ceiling speakers are parallel etc? Is there an "easy" to mark this etc. short of making sure I am there and measuring a board for them before they put it up etc? This might actually be something that is "easier" when you are putting up your own drywall as opposed to guys moving at the speed of light and not really caring about the accuracy of a hole for speaker wire.

Thanks.
post #53 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by basementdweller1 View Post

Ok... two silly (and I actually mean stupid) questions...

1. When I have 2 rows of seating where do I place the side surrounds in a 7.1 system. Even with the front row? In between the two rows? Or even with the back row? Never had a 7.1 setup before. I know the rears go behind the listening positions in a 7.1 so at least I have the part figured out...

2. Ok this is really dumb but here goes. I am going to have a drywall ceiling. The ceiling will be prewired for the 7.1 system. When I have the drywallers put up the ceiling in a month or so how do I get them to accurately place the hole to pull the speaker wire through so my on ceiling speakers are parallel etc? Is there an "easy" to mark this etc. short of making sure I am there and measuring a board for them before they put it up etc? This might actually be something that is "easier" when you are putting up your own drywall as opposed to guys moving at the speed of light and not really caring about the accuracy of a hole for speaker wire.

Thanks.

For #1 my opinion would be to align the side surrounds with the row where you will be sitting the majority of the time (the sweet spot). In other words, just follow the standard placement from THX or Dolby as you would if there was just one row. Otherwise it is probably best to split the difference between the first and second row.

For #2 I nailed electrical work boxes for my speakers, subwoofers, projector, etc and then rolled the cables up tightly into them as high into the ceiling as I could so the drywall workers would not cut or nick them when they cut the outlets in. Worked out well. In your case you will want to do this and buy some wall plates from Monoprice.
post #54 of 128
Thread Starter 
So you put the electrical boxes containing the wire beside the area you wanted to mount a speaker, and then allowed them to cut a standard sized outlet hole over it which you covered with a blank wall plate you drilled just for the speaker wire? For some reason I was imagining wire coming straight out of a small hole in the drywall but if I understand right your solution is easier and neater aside from requiring wall plates which I assume were color matched to not be as noticeable.
post #55 of 128
The way i did mine is i installed these on a stud roughly where my speakers will go

http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2

and ran the speaker wire to it, then the drywall will be cut around it and when its all ready to finish off i will attach the wire to this

http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2

and then run a short speaker wire from that to the speaker. you might be able to see them in the pics of my build thread but if you can't or you want better ones just let me know.
post #56 of 128
Thread Starter 
Thanks BlackAngel...

New issue with the theater cropped up today. I ran the riser calculator and it shows needing a shade over 14" in high for the riser. My ceiling height in the theater is the lowest in the whole basement due to ducts, only 7'7 (when drywalled) vs. 8-9' everywhere else. With a 14" riser I am left with only 6'5" clearance while just fine by me and my short family is as I discovered today, against code where I live. It needs to be over 7'. The riser I want is going to be 12' wide by 6' and asymmetrically attached to the side wall. Should allow for 3 centered seats and about 3'4-3'7 of space along the wall for a walkway or small wall table to hold the remote and a IR blaster. So lots of options and thoughts...

1. Don't put in a riser until after final inspection, but that means A) ripping up carpeting and then recarpeting B) getting the electrician back out to run conduit and outlets into the riser from a finished wall and C) a whole bucketful of $$$$.

2. Put in a 7" max riser and then get some kind of special "back row" theater seat that is 6-8" taller than an identical front or middle row version. It seems Seatcraft (from 4seating.com) makes a decent looking seat like this called the Rialto but there are hardly any reviews of it to find other than a few one liners "it's great!" anywhere and 4seating.com seems to be legit but terrible service often requiring the hassles of multiple phone calls and delayed shipments. Yuck, but it sure sounds like a solution to have a 7" riser and 7-8" taller seat added in the back row to make code and solve my viewing height issue.

Thoughts or OTHER options?
post #57 of 128
in my old house i put a riser in, i had limited ceiling height as well so i only did a riser height of about 6.5". I used 2x6's for the frame and a 1/2" MDF on top. honestly i thought it was fine and no one in the back row had trouble seeing over people in the front row. my seats were coaster studio theater seats.

i had them carpet the entire floor and then put carpet on the riser so it matched and then just sat it on top of the carpet on the floor where i wanted it. i did it that way more for ease of removing it in the future for when i sold that house in case the people buying it didn't want it there and i had to take it out.

so going along that line if you wanted to wait until after inspection you could maybe have the electrician run wire to a covered box in the wall where you would want it to come out of into your riser and carpet the entire floor. Then when you went to add the riser just hook into the electrical wires in the box to run through your riser and just set it on top of the carpet. it wouldn't require tearing anything up and if you felt comfortable you could do the electrical in the riser yourself so you wouldn't have to hire anyone to come back out.
post #58 of 128
Thread Starter 
Here is another idea that at least sounds good to me... I can have my framer do a 12x6 riser to 6.5" height and have that all carpeted etc. which will still be legal to code. This will also have all the electrical in it. Then after I pass the final inspection I make a smaller 8.5x4 riser that is 7-ish" inches high perhaps even making it from a nicer wood for the surface and staining it match my furniture/bar and freestanding it on the larger carpeted riser. The length would be a match to my 3 seats and the 4' depth would allow the seats to sit nicely with a 1' space for stepping onto the higher riser and as a footrest?
post #59 of 128
Do you need to have carpet down for your final inspection where you live? Around here they don't care about finishes.
post #60 of 128
Thread Starter 
Final inspection will require carpet, otherwise yeah the solution would be fairly simple. :-)

PS: In other news all next week is the electrical rough in. Should have tons of stuff going on, 35-ish can lights + boxes for hanging pendants, scones, storage room & workshop lights, lights in the pantry, closets and more all going in + outlets, and more outlets + the lutron grafik eye system, and then low voltage. High voltage will all be in metal conduit. Should be cool to see. Hope to get final rough framing corrections and draft stopping down within a week after that to be ready for rough inspection.
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