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The Grove Theater and Basement Build - Page 24

post #691 of 1268
Vanice - fantastic update - nice work!

I also ask that question >> How did you ever manage, where; did you ever find that many straight 2x2's.
Bummer about the last minute rack "adjustment".

And my last question:
So your entire back wall will have 5.5" ~ 6" of absorption?
post #692 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Great job, Vanice. Were you always able to find a stud to secure everything or did you need some Liquid Nails? I did pretty well hitting studs with my furring strips, but a few needed some help.
How did you find so many straight 2x2s?

Thanks Spaceman. My walls are made with 3/4" OSB and 5/8" drywall so I can attach anywhere. biggrin.gif It was really a big help.

The local lumber yard had some good bundles. I was amazed at how straight they were too. Out of the 60 I bought only one could not be used. I think they started life as 2x4's but were ripped in half. They weren't a true 1.5x1.5. One side was slightly wider (1 11/16" I think). It didn't matter to me as long as one direction was 1.5" and they were pretty straight.
post #693 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuzed2 View Post

Vanice - fantastic update - nice work!
I also ask that question >> How did you ever manage, where; did you ever find that many straight 2x2's.

Thanks cuzed. See my reply to Spaceman. I was amazed myself. Need to get back there and get more while they are still straight!
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuzed2 View Post

Bummer about the last minute rack "adjustment".

It did suck but was faster and a whole lot less headache to cut the rack one position vs. taking out all the framing we had just done. Live and learn I guess. Luckily the rack should still have more than enough room in it for what I need.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuzed2 View Post

And my last question:
So your entire back wall will have 5.5" ~ 6" of absorption?

Yes, the whole back wall will be 6" thick of Knauf 3lb rigid fiberglass board. This is what was spec'd for my room by Bpape. All side walls (and the front) will be 2" thick.
post #694 of 1268
Everything is looking great vanice! That is quite the progress.

I'm sorry to hear about the rack. I don't even want to think of all the times that I have mis-measured something. Once, I framed a 32" opening for a 32" door. Not much room to shim it! eek.gif

Keep up the good work. You're in the home stretch.
post #695 of 1268
So jealous of the straight 2x2s. It takes me longer to sort through the pile at Menards that it does to actually use them! The local lowes is even worse here. I don't even attempt to get straight lumber there.

Even more jealous of your progress. Looks great! Keep it up!!
post #696 of 1268
Yeah we ended up doing a rack adjustment too. I think we had to slide the whole thing up a ways from our original hole in the framing. I forget what the issue was, maybe I forgot the plywood that goes on top of the stage or something as part of the height measurement. There's always something silly like that.

That's a lot of 2x2 backings!!! I can't wait to see your finished product!
post #697 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaustin View Post

Everything is looking great vanice! That is quite the progress.
I'm sorry to hear about the rack. I don't even want to think of all the times that I have mis-measured something. Once, I framed a 32" opening for a 32" door. Not much room to shim it! eek.gif
Keep up the good work. You're in the home stretch.

Thanks aaustin. I didn't feel like we accomplished much but once I started looking at the pictures it does seem like we made good progress. Just not where I had hoped to be so that weighs on my mind everytime I am down there working.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GWCR View Post

So jealous of the straight 2x2s. It takes me longer to sort through the pile at Menards that it does to actually use them! The local lowes is even worse here. I don't even attempt to get straight lumber there.
Even more jealous of your progress. Looks great! Keep it up!!

Thanks GWCR. I know what you mean. I have checked out Menards 2x2's and they were a joke. I swear there was one piece in there where one end was twisted 90 degrees to the other end. eek.gif I have purchased the majority of my lumber at a local lumber yard. It is a little more expensive but in this case, saved me gobs of time picking through a pile. I just need to make it back there to buy more before it's too late.

Quote:
Originally Posted by damelon View Post

Yeah we ended up doing a rack adjustment too. I think we had to slide the whole thing up a ways from our original hole in the framing. I forget what the issue was, maybe I forgot the plywood that goes on top of the stage or something as part of the height measurement. There's always something silly like that.
That's a lot of 2x2 backings!!! I can't wait to see your finished product!

I know. And it always happens at the most inconvenient time. At least we both had workable solutions. I just hope I didn't forget a wire or something obvious now that everything is closed up. That would be unworkable at this point.

I was hoping for 1" treatments so I could just copy your panel build but he came back with 2" treatments so I had to find an easier way to offset everything. Building so many 2" deep panels out of 1/2" ply was out. Way too much work and they would be pretty heavy. So I decided to use 2x2 backing with a 3/4" panel attached to them. This will give me a little extra depth for the treatments and much lighter frames. With a little bracing I think they will be fine when I go to stretch fabric over them. I just won't have as much of a chamfer on them as you did. I too can't wait to see a panel go up. Probably going to be about two weeks before that happens though. frown.gif
post #698 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Found out I won't be getting my screen until next week (allegedly). Very displeased with the customer service I have received to this point. I will leave it at that. God help them if I actually receive the screen and it's the wrong size. mad.gifmad.gifmad.gifmad.gif
post #699 of 1268
Vanice,

Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family. Time to sit back and reflect on all you have gotten done (and not worry about "alleged" deadlines).

Enjoy!
post #700 of 1268
Sorry to hear about the delays, Vanice. They can certainly be frustrating. Just think about all of the movies you are going to watch between now and next Thanksgiving.

Happy Turkey Day!
post #701 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuzed2 View Post

Vanice,
Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family. Time to sit back and reflect on all you have gotten done (and not worry about "alleged" deadlines).
Enjoy!

Thanks cuzed! Same to you! I know I shouldn't get so worked up but I don't appreciate the run-around. Very true, it has been a pretty good "almost" year of progress. Looking forward to that first movie though. Like a kid at Christmas! biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Sorry to hear about the delays, Vanice. They can certainly be frustrating. Just think about all of the movies you are going to watch between now and next Thanksgiving.
Happy Turkey Day!

Thanks Spaceman! Definitely. Already have my list and checking it twice. biggrin.gif

Happy Thanksgiving!!
post #702 of 1268
Quote:
Originally Posted by vanice View Post

Another delivery today. Hope this helps tame the IB.
IMG_2544.jpg
And now time for a little wiring. Broke out my first Insteon dimmer. This is a 6 button dimmer that will have scene control for the theater. It directly controls 11 of the 15 soffit can lights. I really like the look of this Insteon dimmer. I have a black keypad kit that I will switch out once the dimmer is in it's final home.
IMG_2548.jpg
Need to get an extension for the box and add some spacers around the dimmer to give me a place to attach the fabric to.
And let there be light!
IMG_2550.jpg
IMG_2551.jpg
The front of the room is still pretty dark because I haven't installed the four lights over the stage (on a different circuit which hasn't been installed yet).
IMG_2552.jpg
I can now finally work in the room without my shop lights. biggrin.gif
Used these new lights to test out the fit of my speaker front panel. Tight fit. Still have another piece to install on the front but starting to see the final product.
IMG_2553.jpg
Really happy with the way the lights turned out. Need to finish the light trims and get those installed. Tomorrow I will fill some holes in the columns and get them ready for sealing. And maybe glue some more on the speaker boxes.

For some reason, those first couple of pics remind me of scaled versions of little towns for movie special effects smile.gif
post #703 of 1268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Very nice. I think you'll like the dark carpet. It will look great in your room. I've had two sets of measurements taken this week. One estimate so far. Still waiting for the 2nd set of numbers so we can pick one and get it ordered.

I LOVED my black carpet in my last theater. Just be sure to invest in a vacuum just for the theater. I had to vaccum mine a couple of times a week to keep it clean.In hindsight, I'd still go with black again though.
post #704 of 1268
Quote:
Originally Posted by vanice View Post

The Long Weekend Update...
So I took off Friday to help give me more time to push this build along. Friday we mainly worked on getting the lower panels on the soffits. I am using velcro as an aid in attaching the panels to the soffit structure. Some of the panels held just fine with velcro only but they did tend to sag a little lower than I would have liked. If I had used 1/2" Plywood for the panels I think they would have matched up pretty well with the light tray but I didn't. So, I threw in some finishing nails to help secure the panels and get them nice and snug with the bottom ladder structure. After several rounds of testing (and trips to the store rolleyes.gif) I finally found a nail that would go through the fabric without grabbing it and pulling it too. Bonus, they were black coated. Negative, had to put them in by hand.
Here is the first panel up. These pics will be hard to see because the panel and soffit are all black.
IMG_2593.jpg
IMG_2594.jpg
IMG_2598.jpg
And by the end of the day all panels were up.
IMG_2597.jpg
Saturday started with locating all the columns and getting the blocking started for them. All would be attached to the walls using 2x2's except for the front columns. They would need some additional offset due to them having to go in after the carpet because they are so close to the stage.
Typical 2x2 layout
IMG_2600.jpg
Offset blocking for the front columns.
IMG_2601.jpg
All column mounting locations complete.
IMG_2599.jpg
We finished up Saturday by starting the offsets for the wall panels. This began very slow and never really gained much momentum. We were able to complete one side of the theater and then we hit the wall, literally. The back wall has 6" worth of treatment which means my panels need to be spaced out roughly 5 1/2" from the back wall to fit them. This proved to be a very difficult task with the materials I had on hand. After much fighting and cursing I finally had one section up and it was a good place to call it a day.
The beginnings of many 2x2's. The first sections take shape.
IMG_2602.jpg
And my method for offsetting the back panels and allowing me the most room for treatments.
IMG_2605.jpg
Sorry, there isn't a good shot of the first back wall offset section. You can kinda see it in the above pic. Basically I am building the same offset structure that I did for the side walls but instead of attaching it directly to the wall, I am attaching it all together into a free-standing panel and then attaching it to the offsets I showed above. I'll try and get a better pic tonight to show it.
Sunday began with more 2x2's on the walls. We skipped over most of the back wall because it was such a pain that I didn't want to slow myself down starting a new day. Unfortunately my supply of 2x2's dissappeared quickly and we were unable to finish. Here are some pics of the progress to date.
Back wall. You can see the one panel we did complete on the right. Just need to mirror that to the other side and also do the middle section.
IMG_2603.jpg
Other side wall. This is where we ran out. Didn't make it into the entryway.
IMG_2606.jpg
So with no more 2x2's I decided to try and get the rack opening finished so that I could get some paint on it and get the rack ready for it's final home. Well, wouldn't you know, issues. We made a box to frame the inside of the opening, leveled everything, and then secured it very well. Then we built a nice shelf to support the back side of the rack. I could sit on this shelf without so much as a creak so I know that it will support some weight. Then it was in with the rack. The opening was too small. mad.gif I could have boiled water on top of my head. Now what. The opening was so well secured that it would have taken all day to rip it out and start over. Solution. Cut down my rack to fit. I only lost 1U but it hurt to do it. After spending some time hacking down the uprights it finally fit in it's new home.
IMG_2607.jpg
IMG_2609.jpg
IMG_2608.jpg
I was losing motivation after this ordeal but wanted to get the back plates for the 4Pi's cut. You can see them here. Copied the cutout in the back plate from BIG's design.
IMG_2604.jpg
So, what have I learned from this past weekends work?
1) Measure, measure, and measure again before cutting
2) Timeouts are a required part of the build day otherwise you begin to make bad decisions as you get tired or frustrated.
3) Start a to-do list.
4) I have no idea how to judge my timeline for this project.
5) Hacking together a movie for this weekend could be very tough.
I am going to try to put in some work on the 4Pi's this week. We'll see if I can't cross something off the list. rolleyes.gif


You have me scared now. I've literally measured my rack opening about a dozen times, but I've held off on ordering out of fear that I did something wrong and it won't fit. All the while, that "no return on special orders" label staring me in the face. I know I need to just pull the trigger at some point.
post #705 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mn_hokie View Post

I LOVED my black carpet in my last theater. Just be sure to invest in a vacuum just for the theater. I had to vaccum mine a couple of times a week to keep it clean.In hindsight, I'd still go with black again though.

Thanks for the review. Just got pricing back on carpet and it was a little surprising. It's really going to be tough to carpet the whole basement at the same time. Hopefully we'll be able to get the ball rolling soon.
post #706 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mn_hokie View Post

You have me scared now. I've literally measured my rack opening about a dozen times, but I've held off on ordering out of fear that I did something wrong and it won't fit. All the while, that "no return on special orders" label staring me in the face. I know I need to just pull the trigger at some point.


Luckily the rack was able to be cut down. Bonehead move on my part while I was framing in the opening to fit tight around the rack. Only thing I would make sure of is the width. You can make the opening smaller or trim the rack down but making the opening bigger is really tough, especially after drywall. Pull the trigger. smile.gif
post #707 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Did a little more work on the back wall yesterday. Also made a dumpster run with all the building scraps I had accumulated. Picked up more 2x2's to finish the walls as well.

Here is one of the horns for the 4Pi's I am working on.

Wrapped with window sealing putty.

IMG_2610.jpg

Now with a little duct tape to hold it all together.

IMG_2611.jpg

And now a question for those who have worked with RGB LED light strips.

I am trying to construct a jumper wire to connect two LED strips. I have some quick connectors and some 4-conductor wire.

Here is what I want to do.

IMG_2614.jpg

IMG_2615.jpg

IMG_2616.jpg

The clips have small tabs in them that the wire is supposed to slide under. The wire is a little thick to fit and get the clip to close. The wires also touch each other which I'm guessing is not supposed to happen. Anyone have any suggestions on how I can make these clips work? I'm hoping that I don't have to solder these connections. Can I trim out a few wires to make them fit under the tabs better and also keep them from touching? Hope you guys have some nuggets of wisdom.
Edited by vanice - 11/24/12 at 1:23pm
post #708 of 1268
Are all these parts designed and sold to fit together? If so, just make sure that you've got the wires straightened and gently twisted so that they are compact and manageable. If they are not designed to work together, maybe you need some larger connectors

If, at least in theory, the shape and size of the connector is not important - meaning that you can change both ends at your discretion, you could go to an auto parts store and pick up some generic connectors. Maybe they'll have a 4-wire pigtail set with both ends, but probably simpler is four bullet connectors. You'll need a box of male ends, and a box of female ends, and a crimper. They're color coded for wire gauge.

While the wires are probably of sufficient gauge that you could carefully trim out the extra strands that you couldn't make fit with what you've got, I'd try to avoid that, for the simple reasons that it's a pain in the neck, and if you get sloppy and some of them short together, you could (at least in theory) blow fuses, damage controllers, or even start a fire.
post #709 of 1268
Purchasing the wire specifically engineered for RGB LED strip lights and to work with these connectors was the way to go because both the sheathing size and thickness will allow for the clips to close and give you a secure electrical connection. The pictures are fuzzy, but it appears you go the 18 gauge stranded wire, correct? (As an FYI, there should be a "Digital Macro" feature on your camera that will allow you to take extra-close clear photos).

Realistically the stripped ends of the wire should be much shorter - just enough to allow good electrical contact within the connector but also allow the connector to clamp down on the sheath of each conductor to provide strain relief. I am sorry to say, but thinning down either the sheathing or the number of strands to make this wire work are not solutions I would recommend - especially the latter.

However, if you want to try to make it work I would give each of the conductors a firm twist to keep all the wires together and then snip so only about 1/8" remains. You must be very precise in the stripping back of the sheath and the cutting back of all the copper strands after twisting to make sure they are all even when inserted into the connector. If the connector will not close, you could use your wire strippers at the "20 gauge" setting to strip the outer set of conductors of this 18 gauge wire. NOTE: I am not aware of your electrical run lengths for these lights, so it will be up to you to calculate the resistance given the length of the wire and now the new narrower gauge. This will also be a point of heat as the 18 gauge wire is now being bottlenecked into a 20 gauge diameter. If you do your electrical calculations and determine that your run lengths can handle the resistance a 20 gauge wire offers, then I would say proceed cautiously . If this allows you to close the connector, then obviously check the continuity and the strain relief of this connection.

When it comes to electrical, I never like to "make something work". Despite the above, my best advice would be to buck up for the wire specifically designed and engineered to work with these connectors. I know you went with what you got for the sake of saving money, but there is just no beating having the right materials for the job.

Otherwise you are unfortunately left with soldering - which I have done - and I can tell you with these LED light strips it is exceptionally tedious and laborious. Sorry I don't have better news for you, but good luck in your decision.
post #710 of 1268
One more thought to use your existing wire between two lighting strips would be to get the pre-fabbed pigtails that can go with RGB LED lights like this: http://www.ledstripbox.com/fls4fpc-flexible-rgb-led-light-strip-pigtail-connector-p-406.html
post #711 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Sorry, just realized that the pics that were attached were not correct. I have updated my post to show the clips and wire. Sorry they are blurry. Camera would not take a good picture being that close. I need to read through everyone's responses but I won't have a chance to until later tonight. Thanks for those who have posted so far.
post #712 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

Purchasing the wire specifically engineered for RGB LED strip lights and to work with these connectors was the way to go because both the sheathing size and thickness will allow for the clips to close and give you a secure electrical connection. The pictures are fuzzy, but it appears you go the 18 gauge stranded wire, correct? (As an FYI, there should be a "Digital Macro" feature on your camera that will allow you to take extra-close clear photos).
Realistically the stripped ends of the wire should be much shorter - just enough to allow good electrical contact within the connector but also allow the connector to clamp down on the sheath of each conductor to provide strain relief. I am sorry to say, but thinning down either the sheathing or the number of strands to make this wire work are not solutions I would recommend - especially the latter.
However, if you want to try to make it work I would give each of the conductors a firm twist to keep all the wires together and then snip so only about 1/8" remains. You must be very precise in the stripping back of the sheath and the cutting back of all the copper strands after twisting to make sure they are all even when inserted into the connector. If the connector will not close, you could use your wire strippers at the "20 gauge" setting to strip the outer set of conductors of this 18 gauge wire. NOTE: I am not aware of your electrical run lengths for these lights, so it will be up to you to calculate the resistance given the length of the wire and now the new narrower gauge. This will also be a point of heat as the 18 gauge wire is now being bottlenecked into a 20 gauge diameter. If you do your electrical calculations and determine that your run lengths can handle the resistance a 20 gauge wire offers, then I would say proceed cautiously . If this allows you to close the connector, then obviously check the continuity and the strain relief of this connection.
When it comes to electrical, I never like to "make something work". Despite the above, my best advice would be to buck up for the wire specifically designed and engineered to work with these connectors. I know you went with what you got for the sake of saving money, but there is just no beating having the right materials for the job.
Otherwise you are unfortunately left with soldering - which I have done - and I can tell you with these LED light strips it is exceptionally tedious and laborious. Sorry I don't have better news for you, but good luck in your decision.

Thanks for the explanation. I did get the 18GA 4 conductor wire. The connectors are unfortunately slightly different than the ones you reference. These were made for connecting one strip to another with zero gap. I was thinking that I could use them to make jumpers but the wire may be too thick for the clamp to close.

Those connectors you show may be a good alternative even though I already spent money on the connectors. Would need over 50 to complete the room though. eek.gif I'll give the ones I have one more shot using your suggestions and see if I can make them work. Thanks for the reply.
post #713 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

Are all these parts designed and sold to fit together? If so, just make sure that you've got the wires straightened and gently twisted so that they are compact and manageable. If they are not designed to work together, maybe you need some larger connectors
If, at least in theory, the shape and size of the connector is not important - meaning that you can change both ends at your discretion, you could go to an auto parts store and pick up some generic connectors. Maybe they'll have a 4-wire pigtail set with both ends, but probably simpler is four bullet connectors. You'll need a box of male ends, and a box of female ends, and a crimper. They're color coded for wire gauge.
While the wires are probably of sufficient gauge that you could carefully trim out the extra strands that you couldn't make fit with what you've got, I'd try to avoid that, for the simple reasons that it's a pain in the neck, and if you get sloppy and some of them short together, you could (at least in theory) blow fuses, damage controllers, or even start a fire.

Thanks for the reply HF. Getting some pre made connectors may be the way I have to go. Going to try it with a little less wire exposed but if that doesn't work I don't think I will try thinning the wire. Probably should just get some pre made ends and use the 18GA wire I have to extend them. Man, these lights are getting expensive. rolleyes.gif
post #714 of 1268
I gave you the wrong link above, but instead of editing my comment I thought I would create a new post. This is what I would buy: http://www.amazon.com/HitLights-LED-Connector-Conductor-Changing/dp/B006VZKSNC/ref=pd_sim_lg_1

You could then snip each one of these in half and splice in your 18 gauge four conductor wire with butt splices to extend this termination. This would seem to be the easiest route that would still allow you to use the wiring you bought and avoid soldering.

By the way, when I was talking about the engineered RGB LED wire, I was talking about this stuff because it is specifically made to work with molded connectors: http://www.amazon.com/LEDwholesalers-Conductor-Changing-LED-Strips/dp/B0077K1G22
post #715 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

I gave you the wrong link above, but instead of editing my comment I thought I would create a new post. This is what I would buy: http://www.amazon.com/HitLights-LED-Connector-Conductor-Changing/dp/B006VZKSNC/ref=pd_sim_lg_1
You could then snip each one of these in half and splice in your 18 gauge four conductor wire with butt splices to extend this termination. This would seem to be the easiest route that would still allow you to use the wiring you bought and avoid soldering.
By the way, when I was talking about the engineered RGB LED wire, I was talking about this stuff because it is specifically made to work with molded connectors: http://www.amazon.com/LEDwholesalers-Conductor-Changing-LED-Strips/dp/B0077K1G22

I ordered a pack of these to see if they will work or not.
post #716 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Not a ton of progress over the long weekend but here are the highlights.

Worked on the middle section of the rear wall. Nearly have the rear wall complete now. Royal pain to make the spacers and then build a freestanding frame to attach to them. Much easier to cut pieces and attach them directly to the wall.

Here are two pics of the middle section of the rear wall.

IMG_2626.jpg

IMG_2627.jpg

I then painted the back side flanges of the columns. They are almost ready to be wrapped. Just need to drill a few holes for lighting wires.

IMG_2617.jpg

And last but not least I finished up the lighting and wiring on the front stage.

IMG_2618.jpg

IMG_2620.jpg

Adds a lot more light to the room.

I also added a few of the trim pieces to the lights that I had done. These finish the lights off very nicely. They are hard to photograph since everything is black but here are a couple of shots.

IMG_2622.jpg

IMG_2624.jpg

And an updated look (as everything sits right now) towards the back of the room.

IMG_2625.jpg

Going to work on the speakers some this week. Hopefully I can get them almost ready for paint by this next weekend. I will also be ordering the theater carpet tonight. I'm guessing it will be in right around Christmas. And who knows, I might actually get an update that my screen has shipped. I'm not holding my breath. rolleyes.gif
post #717 of 1268
Thread Starter 
Pulled the trigger on carpet last night. Went with the darker Slate Path. A little nervous about it but crossing my fingers that it looks good in the room with the wall treatments. Should be installed in about 2-3 weeks. I probably won't have all my panels up by then but hopefully I will have at least started.

Also, I got actual proof that my screen has shipped and I should be receiving it on Wednesday. I did send them an email verifying that they made and shipped the correct size. They say yes. We'll see when it gets here.

And finally, I should receive the last of my Insteon products this week. This will allow me to get my soffit lights up and running. As for mounting the LED's in the soffit, I'm thinking about getting some plastic (1st choice) or metal corner bead to give me a nice flat surface to mount them to. Should be quicker and easier to install than anything wooden and gives me a continuous surface which is good to have with the LED strip lights. Still need to purchase all the LED's for the columns and IB enclosure. Probably won't have those until after the first of the year.
post #718 of 1268
That last round of photos looks great !
Love the paint job on the trim for the can lights smile.gif
post #719 of 1268
Quote:
Originally Posted by vanice View Post

Thanks for the review. Just got pricing back on carpet and it was a little surprising. It's really going to be tough to carpet the whole basement at the same time. Hopefully we'll be able to get the ball rolling soon.

Yea, I paid a ton for the carpet, but it really did define the space.
post #720 of 1268
Quote:
Originally Posted by vanice View Post

Also, I got actual proof that my screen has shipped and I should be receiving it on Wednesday. I did send them an email verifying that they made and shipped the correct size. They say yes. We'll see when it gets here.
That's good to hear vanice! Still hopeful that mine ships this week as well.

Soffits are looking great!
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