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Panasonic DMP BDT500 - Page 41

post #1201 of 1791
I have an older non-HDMI receiver that has 7.1 audio connectivity.

Since I have set-up the bluray player to perform the audio processing and based on the audio options selected on the disc how can I tell what format I am listening to?

The read out from my receiver just defaults to the 8 Channel connectivity so no Dolby or DTS formats are being displayed.
post #1202 of 1791
To determine the type of audio that is recorded on a disc, you have to look at whatever information is provided by the disc player in its on-screen display.

For a receiver to know what type of audio is on the disc, it has to receive and decode those digital audio signals itself. In other words, you'd need to upgrade to a receiver with HDMI connections. The way you have it connected, the receiver has no way to know what is coming off the disc. It is receiving just analog voltages. For all it knows, they could be coming from microphones.
post #1203 of 1791
Reciever does not care what signal it gets thru analog connection. The audio is whatever you chose on the disc's movie setup when using the player's 7.1 analog outputs. No need get a new receiver. 7.1 analog is the same quality as you get from HDMI except without the digital audio dropouts.
By the way, the memery card slot on the front of the 500 is awesome! Pics (slideshow) from the SDHC card from my camera look much better than on my PC's 24in monitor even when enlarged by the HDTV display running the same resolution.

Edit: The BDT 500 also has better DACs than almost every receiver ever made so unless you spend thousands on the very top-of-the-line AVR then any HDMI AVR is a down grade from your 7.1 analog receiver. 7.1 analog inputs used to be on even bottom of the line AVRs but now only on the very top models. Over the years the manufacturers keep dropping useful features (7.1, switched and unswitched 120v outlets, pre-outs etc) and giving us "conveinience" features.
Edited by Bob7145 - 5/2/13 at 1:56pm
post #1204 of 1791
An advantage to getting a modern receiver with HDMI is that most (but not all) of them include room equalization software. In most cases, after being calibrated, room equalization can significantly improve the quality of the sound in your listening room. That improvement is far more than the very subtle differences produced by the use of different DACs.
post #1205 of 1791
Good point about room EQ. Even bass management in a receiver / preamp can be more sophisticated than the highest-end players.
post #1206 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob7145 View Post

Reciever does not care what signal it gets thru analog connection. The audio is whatever you chose on the disc's movie setup when using the player's 7.1 analog outputs. No need get a new receiver. 7.1 analog is the same quality as you get from HDMI except without the digital audio dropouts.
By the way, the memery card slot on the front of the 500 is awesome! Pics (slideshow) from the SDHC card from my camera look much better than on my PC's 24in monitor even when enlarged by the HDTV display running the same resolution.

Edit: The BDT 500 also has better DACs than almost every receiver ever made so unless you spend thousands on the very top-of-the-line AVR then any HDMI AVR is a down grade from your 7.1 analog receiver. 7.1 analog inputs used to be on even bottom of the line AVRs but now only on the very top models. Over the years the manufacturers keep dropping useful features (7.1, switched and unswitched 120v outlets, pre-outs etc) and giving us "conveinience" features.

Bob,

DACs are but a small part of the equation. It's about implementation and you don't have to spend alot of money to eclipse the sound of this Panny in an AVR. A decent AVR in the $800 to $1,000 price range with room correction will outperform this Panny and the rest of your source components will benefit from it.

I am not dumping on this Panny because I own this unit and Panasonic should be commended for what it has done at this price point, but the DAC implementation in this Panny does have some limitations and shortcomings (read some the earlier posts) as you are VERY limited with a $350 MSRP.smile.gif Some people see 32 bit DAC in the specs and start hearing improvements that may not exist. I think they refer to this as the placebo affect.biggrin.gif
post #1207 of 1791
I use REW for room EQ, no automatic stuff. Same DACs as Pioneer Elite top of the line. You can spend thousands on an AVR and get the same placebo effect if you want.
post #1208 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob7145 View Post

I use REW for room EQ, no automatic stuff. Same DACs as Pioneer Elite top of the line. You can spend thousands on an AVR and get the same placebo effect if you want.

These are quality DACs and as you state they are in the top of the line Pioneer Elite model, but I promise you the implementation is much better in Pioneer and all source components benefit from it. My only point was that the Panny has chose a quality DAC and a simple implementation. There is only so much that can be accomplished on the analog side in a $350 blu-ray playerregardless of what DAC is implemented in the player, but Panny made a point of mentioning the player has 32 bit DACs in their press release. I have heard these same DACs in other players, AVRs and PrePros and the sound and implementation is better.smile.gif

It's all about implementation and not necessarily what DAC is being used. Also, there are 24 bit DACs that outperform 32 bit DACs because of their implementation.smile.gif
post #1209 of 1791
Ya, No problem smile.gif Just wanted to point out to him that he can get great sound without spending a bundle on a new AVR especially since those things become obsolete before you get them out of the box what with the HDMI specs changing frequently, bandwidth problems with 3D + HD audio and the old slow 240mgz hdmi chips that newer 300mgz chips hope to cure smile.gif I'll get a new AVR when DisplayPort comes around. Being a PC gamer makes me look elsewhere than HDMI and current HDTVs frown.gif
But the 3D from the BDT-500 is really good. Originally became interested in the 350 because it supported Checkerboard 3D which you could get someone to pay you to take their DLP (great for 3D gaming on PC) off their hands. smile.gif
post #1210 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob7145 View Post

Ya, No problem smile.gif Just wanted to point out to him that he can get great sound without spending a bundle on a new AVR especially since those things become obsolete before you get them out of the box what with the HDMI specs changing frequently, bandwidth problems with 3D + HD audio and the old slow 240mgz hdmi chips that newer 300mgz chips hope to cure smile.gif I'll get a new AVR when DisplayPort comes around. Being a PC gamer makes me look elsewhere than HDMI and current HDTVs frown.gif
But the 3D from the BDT-500 is really good. Originally became interested in the 350 because it supported Checkerboard 3D which you could get someone to pay you to take their DLP (great for 3D gaming on PC) off their hands. smile.gif

Bob,

The Panny was a life saver for me, because I have an old Denon AVR-3802 in my bedroom setup and I didn't want to pay the price premium just to gain 7.1 analog support from the Oppo (didn't need all the other features) for this setup. I just wanted good high resolution audio for blu-ray and having FLAC support was an additional bonus as I have over 22,000 FLAC files.smile.gif
Edited by bakerwi - 5/5/13 at 7:13am
post #1211 of 1791
Same here. Have three AVRs with 7.1 analog in the house and none have HDMI. But with the 500 I can move it to another room if I want. By the way, I found a CAR Audio 6 channel cable that makes wiring easy because it's just 1 cable with 6 RCA plugs on each end and is 15 Ft long. Combined that with another 3 wire cable for the other 2 channels. For PC use I used the extra wire for SP/DIF from an MDP-130.
post #1212 of 1791
Also Bakerwi 800 to 1000 to some is alot of $$$. As opposed to 300.
post #1213 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by parkman View Post

Also Bakerwi 800 to 1000 to some is alot of $$$. As opposed to 300.

I agree $800 to $1,000 is a lot depending on ones budget; that is why there are players in every price range. Quite honestly if one only requires blu-ray, DVD and some basic streaming they need not spend more than $200.smile.gif However, if you require more (7.1 analog, SACD, DVD-A, HDCD, FLAC, more streaming partners, etc) you will have to spend more.biggrin.gif So in these instances spending more gets your more.smile.gif
post #1214 of 1791
Panasonic used to make respect it and expensive analog equipment under the Technics brand name. Some of there turntables and reel to reel recorders cost more than the Oppo 105. They have the experience and the know-how to make a good sounding player. The BDT 500 2ch is such a machine when used in analog
post #1215 of 1791
I agree.
post #1216 of 1791
Hi,

I'm starting from scratch for a new system. I'm considering either the BDT500 or BDT 330. I plan to leave a HDD attached full-time for music library. Does the BDT500 require that I use the front USB port? (i.e. with the fold-down door open?) or can I use the rear USB port for a HDD?

Thanks!
post #1217 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by floridian View Post

Hi,

I'm starting from scratch for a new system. I'm considering either the BDT500 or BDT 330. I plan to leave a HDD attached full-time for music library. Does the BDT500 require that I use the front USB port? (i.e. with the fold-down door open?) or can I use the rear USB port for a HDD?

Thanks!

The rear port is used only for a Communication Camera. And yes, you would have to use the front port when connecting an HDD. This has been one of the few complaints from owners concerning connections on the 500 and although I have yet to connect an HDD, if I decide to, I'm sure I won't like it either.

Al
post #1218 of 1791
Does anyone have a link to the Panasonic BDT-xxx review which measured the YCbCr 4:4:4, 4:2:2 and RGB outputs? I can't find it now and would like to know the best setting for this player. I have it connected to the wife's Panasonic PZ80 so I'm not that familiar with it.
post #1219 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by AVfile View Post

Does anyone have a link to the Panasonic BDT-xxx review which measured the YCbCr 4:4:4, 4:2:2 and RGB outputs? I can't find it now and would like to know the best setting for this player. I have it connected to the wife's Panasonic PZ80 so I'm not that familiar with it.

I have a WILD IDEA - why not try all three and pick the one you LIKE.
post #1220 of 1791
4:2:2 is on every disc you play, plus you have a TV, not a monitor, so I'd stick with that.
post #1221 of 1791
Actually, discs are 4:2:0. Most STB's output 444 (either ycbcr or RGB). Not all displays handle 422 as well as 444, or vise versa. You must test these things, period.

Ive also found where a display looked better on test patterns with 422, but had less banding in actual content on 444, so...
post #1222 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by drhankz View Post

I have a WILD IDEA - why not try all three and pick the one you LIKE.

Spent 2 hrs last night doing this. Tried all 3 HDMI settings with the chroma burst pattern on the S&M blu-ray. The only one that passed was RGB. With both forms of YCbCr the block with the highest rate chroma burst was missing!

All other player settings are default which gave the best chroma response. TV is Panny 46PZ80, sharpness set to 0.
Edited by AVfile - 6/6/13 at 12:30pm
post #1223 of 1791
With my VT50, the 500 passes with 422 and 444 ycbcr, if you are referring to the chroma multi burst pattern, where a fail can me the right side fine resolution patterns can't start turning very dark.

I use normal mode and chroma off. My gt30 passed it but the squares were too dark IMO.
post #1224 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by AVfile View Post

Spent 2 hrs last night doing this. Tried all 3 HDMI settings with the chroma burst pattern on the S&M blu-ray. The only one that passed was RGB. With both forms of YCbCr the block with the highest rate chroma burst was missing!

All other player settings are default which gave the best chroma response. TV is Panny 46PZ80, sharpness set to 0.

It is always - WHAT WORKS FOR YOU THAT COUNTS.
post #1225 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by gadgtfreek View Post

... where a fail can me the right side fine resolution patterns can't start turning very dark.

Come again? I think you meant "a fail can MEAN the right side fine resolution patterns start turning very dark" to which I agree.
Depending on the player settings, I could make the finest block on the right side turn darker, brighter, grey (no color) or disappear completely (black).

My wife's TV is obviously an older model so I appreciate your input, thanks.
post #1226 of 1791
Yeah, that's what I meant. Not always coming out right from a phone keyboard.
post #1227 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by PINKTULIPS7 View Post

Panasonic DMP-BDT500 is the most stylish and superb performance in PQ and Audio(7.1)...when I am comparing with Panasonic DMP-BD85K I would say Picture quality has improved by atleast 15/20% as well as Analog 7.1 output is far superior than DMP-BD85K whichone also excellent BD Player............Netflix is much improved with 1080P 5.1 DD or DTS also you can browse...Touch Sensor remote control is fast and very sensitive required some prackticing...only downside is that it is not capable to receive WIFI in 5GHZ only 2.4GHZ..........

Setting up my 500 I realized it is not reading my 5GHZ signal, like my BD85 did....Is this for real? Is the 500 really incapable of 5G????
post #1228 of 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakerwi View Post

I have the following in camp Oppo BDP-93, Sony BDP-S790 and the Panasonic DMP-BDT500. My only decision is whether or not I will keep the Sony or the Panasonic. The Oppo and Sony are in my bedroom as the wife (I could care less) enjoys streaming and the Oppo hasn't received the best apps and interfaces from some of its streaming partners. Also, I like the idea of having another player in the house that plays FLAC as I have converted almost 3,000 CDs to FLAC over the years.

I'm primarily interested in image quality when streaming a myriad of files (MKV, TS, M2TS, you name it) in both SD and HD. I currently have the S790 and BDP-103 set up, but no amount of effort gives the 790 the same image quality on my 46Z4100 when playing blurays. Most reviews lead me to believe the BR playback is almost identical regardless of device, am I wrong in that?

Anyways, being this is the BDT500 thread, I'm looking at the BDT500 to achieve the same image quality of the BDP-103 using primarily DLNA while saving $200. I'll also be using NetFlix and Amazon Instant, but those are secondary to DLNA playback. Can it be done?
Edited by caustic386 - 6/27/13 at 2:14pm
post #1229 of 1791
Listening to the new daft punk ram on this player is awesome. Have it playing through the 7.1 audio out and my modest hk dpr 2005/ polk audio speakers. It sounds great
post #1230 of 1791
Ive had my 500 since May 2012, and its been great so far. Granted its been double duty with an Oppo 103, but for blu-ray I have no regrets using it in place of the Oppo. Seems like the 2013 players have had a few bumbs, but this thing works great for me.
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