or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Speakers › What causes tweeter dents?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What causes tweeter dents?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
The tweeter on my 6 month old Def Tech 8040 center has two dents in it. I noticed an increased silibiance recently and low and behold, there were the dents.

What could cause this? My speakers are calibrated to 75dbs at -10 volume on my Denon 791 AVR and I have my receiver set to never go louder than -10.
post #2 of 15
errrrr........ something / someone touched the driver.
post #3 of 15
fingers
post #4 of 15
kids.
post #5 of 15
.
Call CSI; have them dust for prints.
.
post #6 of 15
Lmao
post #7 of 15
put a piece of tape on them and sometimes you can pop the dent back out
post #8 of 15
I don't think the dents cause the sibilance though.
post #9 of 15
Using tape can damage the tweeter if you are not careful.... so if you do it that way, be gentle.

Another thing to try is simply sucking with your mouth (keep it clean boys!) on the tweeter and see if you can pop it out. If you are not comfortable doing that you can try using a vacuum.

Depending on the dent it may not be the problem you are hearing however.
post #10 of 15
Something poked it.

Unfortunately, it looks like the tweeter used in your speakers is aluminium and not a soft dome.

Like with most dome tweeters, you can try to gently pop the tweeter back out using tape which does not leave a residue. Unlike with soft dome tweeters, however, metal-based tweeters are not very resilient to dents in that even after you pop the tweeter back out there will still be slight, potentially barely perceptible, creases in the metal.

From past experience, I will tell you that it is impossible to return a partially dented metal tweeter to a perfect pre-accident state. This is not to say that the tweeter won't improve significantly after the "tape" repair, it very well may, but if you are like me, "close enough" may not satisfy you.

Before messing with the tweeter further, it may be worth it to contact Def Tech and ask them if they will send you a new tweeter. Dome tweeters generally aren't a very expensive part, and when I asked the same thing of Mirage when one of my tweeters was dented, they sent one out right away.

In the case of Mirage, they sent me the entire tweeter assembly, and the repair required nothing more than a hex wrench and ten minutes of my time.

Good luck!
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Tomaskovic View Post

put a piece of tape on them and sometimes you can pop the dent back out

Bad advice for metal tweeters. Most of the time the result will be no better or worse.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by spork42 View Post

Something poked it.

Unfortunately, it looks like the tweeter used in your speakers is aluminium and not a soft dome.

Like with most dome tweeters, you can try to gently pop the tweeter back out using tape which does not leave a residue. Unlike with soft dome tweeters, however, metal-based tweeters are not very resilient to dents in that even after you pop the tweeter back out there will still be slight, potentially barely perceptible, creases in the metal.

From past experience, I will tell you that it is impossible to return a partially dented metal tweeter to a perfect pre-accident state. This is not to say that the tweeter won't improve significantly after the "tape" repair, it very well may, but if you are like me, "close enough" may not satisfy you.

Before messing with the tweeter further, it may be worth it to contact Def Tech and ask them if they will send you a new tweeter. Dome tweeters generally aren't a very expensive part, and when I asked the same thing of Mirage when one of my tweeters was dented, they sent one out right away.

In the case of Mirage, they sent me the entire tweeter assembly, and the repair required nothing more than a hex wrench and ten minutes of my time.

Good luck!

You're describing visible changes, not audible changes. Most of the time a dent alone won't be audible.

A dent alone shouldn't produce sibilance. Maybe there's some other damage, or maybe it's something else. Try listening to just the "good speakers". And try making sure it isn't something else in the room vibrating, or the grills, or something.
post #13 of 15
It's a matter of taste, but if you were my friend I would gently suggest that this is a great excuse to get some better-sounding speakers.

The deaftech speakers all have a harshness to their treble that drives me up the wall; a sure recipe for listener fatigue, IMO.

Speakers that sound very good to many people include PSB, Monitor Audio, KEF and B & W. They have much better-sounding tweeters, plus outstanding overall performance.

If you really want to keep what you have you should get a new tweeter from the manufacturer and replace it; it cannot be repaired. There is no way to restore it to its original shape and rigidity once it has been deformed, which would be essential to restoring its original performance. Any thought of repair is nonsense.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ericthemidget View Post

The tweeter on my 6 month old Def Tech 8040 center has two dents in it. I noticed an increased silibiance recently and low and behold, there were the dents.

What could cause this? My speakers are calibrated to 75dbs at -10 volume on my Denon 791 AVR and I have my receiver set to never go louder than -10.
post #14 of 15
pets, kids, your belts or your wife's ring could be the reasons for the dents. Since they are just 6 months old you may contact Def Tech to see if the damage is covered by warranty
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerstripe View Post

pets, kids, your belts or your wife's ring could be the reasons for the dents. Since they are just 6 months old you may contact Def Tech to see if the damage is covered by warranty

I'd be surprised. That's the same as hail damage on your car being covered under warranty.

BTW, my 18mo old decided to help daddy with the speaker daddy was working on. He dented the tweeter so bad he tore it (CMMD infinity tweeter).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Speakers
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Speakers › What causes tweeter dents?