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Can my speakers handle the power of my new sub?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Am i getting too much sub for my speakers. the sub is so freaking big.

bought a outlaw lfm-1 ex

own def tech UIW RLS III In-Wall Reference Line Source Speakers as fronts.

onkyo 609

thanks
post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by skichiiwa View Post

Am i getting too much sub for my speakers. the sub is so freaking big.

bought a outlaw lfm-1 ex

own def tech UIW RLS III In-Wall Reference Line Source Speakers as fronts.

onkyo 609

thanks

No, you are fine. Set the crossover @100hz and it should blend well
post #3 of 21
Nice!

Why 100 Hz Eric? I see the speakers are rated to 24 Hz (a bit hard to believe, but anyway) so the standard 80 Hz should be okay.
post #4 of 21
From the Definitive Tech page :
UIW RLS III :Specifications
Outer Flange Dimensions | Metric :7 W x 25 H | 17.8 x 63.5 cm
Cut Out Dimensions | Metric :5-7/8 W x 23-3/4 H | 14.9 x 60.3 cm
Depth from Flange | Metric :3-13/16 | 9.7 cm
Driver Complement :One 1" pure aluminum dome tweeters; Two 5-1/4" cast-basket bass/midrange drivers pressure coupled to two 5-1/4 bass radiators
Frequency Response :24 Hz - 30 kHz
Impedance :Compatible with 8 Ohm outputs
Sensitivity :92 dB
Recommended Associated Amplifier Power :10 - 325 watts
A/V Receiver Crossover Setting :60 Hz
Inputs :One pair of gold plated spring loaded posts
post #5 of 21
Frequency Response :24 Hz – 30 kHz
Baloney !!!!
The Supercubes are not even flat to 24Hz.

Regardless of the recommended crossover IMHO 80 or 100Hz would be much more appropriate.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by psgcdn View Post

Nice!

Why 100 Hz Eric? I see the speakers are rated to 24 Hz (a bit hard to believe, but anyway) so the standard 80 Hz should be okay.

DefTech is well known for putting ridiculous specs for their speakers. Heck, even their tiny Promonitors can go down to the 20's according to the idiots at their marketing dept. Either put the corrects specs or dont put anything at all.
post #7 of 21
Also, Audyssey on the Onkyo should give you a nice starting point with the sub level. Mine on my Denon does a pretty good job of keeping the bass appropriate. I think there is no such thing as too much sub. Enjoy that new Outlaw!
post #8 of 21
When configuring the EX, set the gain (volume) on the back of the sub to about 9 or 10 o'clock on the dial. Run Audyssey. If Audyssey sets the channel (trim) subwoofer level on the receiver to below -3db or above +3db, adjust the gain on the sub appropriately and run Audyssey again. Repeat until you end up with Audyssey setting the gain in the -3db to +3db range, even if you have to turn the gain on the sub down further than you think. Then, you can bump the sub channel level a couple db if you need more bass. After running Audyssey, make sure your speakers are set to small (not large or full range) and try different crossovers. I'd go with 80hz first, but try 100hz and 60hz, too. Use whichever sounds best to you.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

When configuring the EX, set the gain (volume) on the back of the sub to about 9 or 10 o'clock on the dial. Run Audyssey. If Audyssey sets the channel (trim) subwoofer level on the receiver to below -3db or above +3db, adjust the gain on the sub appropriately and run Audyssey again. Repeat until you end up with Audyssey setting the gain in the -3db to +3db range, even if you have to turn the gain on the sub down further than you think. Then, you can bump the sub channel level a couple db if you need more bass. After running Audyssey, make sure your speakers are set to small (not large or full range) and try different crossovers. I'd go with 80hz first, but try 100hz and 60hz, too. Use whichever sounds best to you.

Why do you think it's important to be in the +/- 3 range? I would rather be at -6 than +3. If you start at +3 and you want to bump the levels a little bit, you have to go more positive. You then run the risk of overdriving the input on the sub amp, causing distortion. If you start at -6 and you add 3, you're still at -3. Seems like a safer choice to me.

Craig
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by craig john View Post

Why do you think it's important to be in the +/- 3 range? I would rather be at -6 than +3. If you start at +3 and you want to bump the levels a little bit, you have to go more positive. You then run the risk of overdriving the input on the sub amp, causing distortion. If you start at -6 and you add 3, you're still at -3. Seems like a safer choice to me.

Craig

This is the general advice that is often given in the Outlaw Owners Thread and seems to work for people. Go argue with them
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Ok thanks for the setup info guys , I'll start that when the sub get here. However I still want to know if I could get away with less sub is this overkill ?
post #12 of 21
You could buy an Epik Legend or Rythmik FV12 for just a little more (because of the shipping) and they'll have a less overall output and a little less low end extension, but maybe a little better SQ for music.

Below the $500 price point that gets you into this class of 12" ID subs made by Epik, Rythmik, Outlaw, and HSU, the 12" ported budget subs available generally have reduced sound quality, less low frequency extension, and not very flat frequency response. You could buy a 10" ported HSU or Outlaw ID sub in the $400 to $500 range that would have decent sound quality--better than the budget 12" subs--but they wouldn't have the same low frequency extension for movies as the EX and they might be challenged in your room space because of the lower SPL (volume output)--depends on how big your room is. Also, you should check. My guess is that the EX would have a little better SQ than those 10" ID subs
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
mainly talking size of this beast the outlaw lfm1 ex. its huge . May have issues hiding it. haha.
post #14 of 21
Keep in mind that even a very good sub can perform poorly in some spots in a room. If your placement options require hiding, it may not do as well as in other positions. This is why people recommend doing the sub crawl to find the best spot.
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skichiiwa View Post

mainly talking size of this beast the outlaw lfm1 ex. its huge . May have issues hiding it. haha.

you shoulda started off as too add to your issues. I only have 2 locations where this beast can go front left front right otherwise it is a coffee table or side table.

also is there any literature or guide for dummies to understand how to do calibrate the sub .

also what do you listen for during a sub crawl?

noob i know...lol
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by skichiiwa View Post

you shoulda started off as too add to your issues. I only have 2 locations where this beast can go front left front right otherwise it is a coffee table or side table.

If you mean as a side table near the listening position, then one of these two locations generally works well. The sub crawl can tell you which is better. Also, even moving the sub a couple of feet one way or the other can make a difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skichiiwa View Post

also is there any literature or guide for dummies to understand how to do calibrate the sub .

Read all but part III (that's for dual sub setup)

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...5#post14456895

Quote:
Originally Posted by skichiiwa View Post

also what do you listen for during a sub crawl?

See the sub crawl link I gave you,

"Play a bass heavy CD or other format (not 8 track!) that you are familiar with and turn the volume up so that the sub is really working."
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

If you mean as a side table near the listening position, then one of these two locations generally works well. The sub crawl can tell you which is better. Also, even moving the sub a couple of feet one way or the other can make a difference.



Read all but part III (that's for dual sub setup)

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...5#post14456895



See the sub crawl link I gave you,

"Play a bass heavy CD or other format (not 8 track!) that you are familiar with and turn the volume up so that the sub is really working."

thanks bud!
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by craig john View Post

Why do you think it's important to be in the +/- 3 range? I would rather be at -6 than +3. If you start at +3 and you want to bump the levels a little bit, you have to go more positive. You then run the risk of overdriving the input on the sub amp, causing distortion. If you start at -6 and you add 3, you're still at -3. Seems like a safer choice to me.

Craig

Well it would be best to have it at 0dB trim but it seems like it's too much to ask of people to put that much effort into it hence the +/-3dB.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by chashint View Post

Well it would be best to have it at 0dB trim...

Why? What is the downside of a negative trim setting?
post #20 of 21
0 is typically right in the middle of the range so it should be the most linear.
If the trim is set- the gain of the sub is set higher tham necessary and again less linear.
Like all things its not Gospel, it's a good starting point.
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by chashint View Post

0 is typically right in the middle of the range so it should be the most linear.
If the trim is set- the gain of the sub is set higher tham necessary and again less linear.
Like all things its not Gospel, it's a good starting point.

Linear? It's a volume control.

What would be less "linear" at -6 or -8 than at 0?

What would be less "linear" with a higher gain setting on the subwoofer amp?

Craig
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