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German sub recommendations?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'm living in Germany and will be for the next few years. Looking to build 2 subs for my HT. I've been reading through the forums and have my eye on Dayton Audio DVC 15". Only problem is that getting them here in Germany they are around 280 euro last time I checked and having them shipped here would be extremely expensive. Anyone have any recommendations of any german subs of similar quality and price?
post #2 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by djdcm0722 View Post

Anyone have any recommendations of any german subs

U-571.
Hey, someone had to say it.

OP, you should try a German site as well.
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by djdcm0722 View Post

I'm living in Germany and will be for the next few years. Looking to build 2 subs for my HT. I've been reading through the forums and have my eye on Dayton Audio DVC 15". Only problem is that getting them here in Germany they are around 280 euro last time I checked and having them shipped here would be extremely expensive. Anyone have any recommendations of any german subs of similar quality and price?

Look at the reviews (and ads) in Hobby HiFi and Klang+Ton to survey the market.

The Dayton DVC 15 is a fairly ordinary driver. Moderate throw by today's standards, no shorting rings, and stamped basket.
post #4 of 17
Here is a much better subwoofer for less money:

http://www.europe-audio.com/Product.asp?Product_ID=7098

Dayton RSS390HF-4.
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DS-21 View Post

Look at the reviews (and ads) in Hobby HiFi and Klang+Ton to survey the market.

The Dayton DVC 15 is a fairly ordinary driver. Moderate throw by today's standards, no shorting rings, and stamped basket.

Thanks for the info. I looked at their site but since I don't speak german I'll see if I can someone who can help translate it. Google translate isn't doing a very good job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by homeboydeluxe View Post

Here is a much better subwoofer for less money:

http://www.europe-audio.com/Product.asp?Product_ID=7098

Dayton RSS390HF-4.

Twice as expensive as the states I think I am just going to have to wait til I get stationed back in the states or wait for when someone visits me and have them throw a pair in their luggage.

Thanks for the help guys.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by djdcm0722 View Post

Thanks for the info. I looked at their site but since I don't speak german***

Sounds like an odd handicap for someone living in Germany, and one that should be fixed.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by djdcm0722 View Post

I think I am just going to have to wait til I get stationed back in the states or wait for when someone visits me and have them throw a pair in their luggage.

They won't make it onto the plane, due to the magnets. Special procedures are used for shipping drivers by air. In any event you're buying Chinese drivers by way of the US, which is silly. At the least there must be sources that import Chinese drivers direct to Europe, if not actually manufactured there. Many driver manufacturers are located in Italy.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

They won't make it onto the plane, due to the magnets. Special procedures are used for shipping drivers by air.

Wow. Things have certainly changed. Ten years ago, this security theater nonsense wasn't quite as evolved...

(Though I'm still having trouble wrapping my head around the notion of living somewhere and not speaking the local language.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

In any event you're buying Chinese drivers by way of the US, which is silly. At the least there must be sources that import Chinese drivers direct to Europe, if not actually manufactured there. Many driver manufacturers are located in Italy.

You'd be surprised. When I lived in Mitteleuropa (1998-9, 2001-3), upon returning home from a visit to family/friends in the States I would generally bring two things back for my European friends/family: Alden shoes and Seas and/Peerless drivers. Nothing, admittedly, bigger than an XLS12, but that has a pretty hefty motor structure. While I did have to pay import duties in Europe, everything always made it through security.

The shoes make sense, because Aldens are US made, and reasonably priced for the materials/build quality here but exorbitantly expensive in Europe.

As for the drive-units, one would think that on balance prices would be similar, because they have VAT but no trans-Atlantic shipping. That was at the time not the case. European drivers, to say nothing of Chinese ones, were cheaper at Madisound/Meniscus/PE than from the European venders.

Perhaps things are different now, especially with the comparatively stronger EUR. but back then there the EUR and USD floated in a range of parity ± ~15%. I haven't looked into European driver prices in a while.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DS-21 View Post

Wow. Things have certainly changed. Ten years ago, this security theatre nonsense wasn't quite as evolved...

It's not security, it's navigation. One would think that would not be an issue with GPS, but it is. There are strict limits on magnetic flux leakage on air freight. It can be addressed by placing two drivers tightly back to back, so that their flux fields buck each other, but accomplishing that with large magnets is no easy task.
post #10 of 17
http://www.mceproducts.com/knowledge...-dtl.asp?id=10
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

It's not security, it's navigation. One would think that would not be an issue with GPS, but it is. There are strict limits on magnetic flux leakage on air freight. It can be addressed by placing two drivers tightly back to back, so that their flux fields buck each other, but accomplishing that with large magnets is no easy task.

Interesting.

FWIW, passenger carriers (at least ~10yrs ago) either didn't know or didn't care about magnets in luggage.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DS-21 View Post

Interesting.

FWIW, passenger carriers (at least ~10yrs ago) either didn't know or didn't care about magnets in luggage.

A friend of mine owns a company that sells drivers and he told me of the hoops that he has to jump through to use air freight. Because of them he doesn't, he uses ground service only.
post #13 of 17
It all depends on how close to the compass unit the package is. In a big airliner, they are typically out in the wingtips. But smaller planes may have them in the tail cone. If the magnet is strong enough, the heading indicators will get a mis- compare indication.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DS-21 View Post

Sounds like an odd handicap for someone living in Germany, and one that should be fixed.

I am stationed here serving in the military. I can't learn the host nations language of everywhere I'm sent
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by djdcm0722 View Post

I am stationed here serving in the military. I can't learn the host nations language of everywhere I'm sent

Why not? it would take you a couple of days to learn some basic survival phrases (like another beer please and where are the bathrooms?) , After you use up the German you know, switch to English and you will be surprised how much better their English is after they realize you've made an attempt to learn their language.

Just a FYI, From a trip to Germany over a couple of decades ago I remember walking into a couple of stereo shops that sold raw drivers and they had no problem communicating in English.
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

In any event you're buying Chinese drivers by way of the US, which is silly.

The reason I was looking at the Daytons is I see them talked about regularly on here and for the price they are a good bang for the buck. The price difference between drivers I have been looking into are two fold from what I would pay in the states. As I am new to DIY, I do not have the knowledge of what a decent driver consists of. Worst case scenario is if I can't find a suitable supplement or wait til I get to the states I will bite the bullet and pay for the extra shipping (which would still be cheaper than buying the same driver on the economy).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

Many driver manufacturers are located in Italy.

Any that you can recommend?
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Why not? it would take you a couple of days to learn some basic survival phrases (like another beer please and where are the bathrooms?) , After you use up the German you know, switch to English and you will be surprised how much better their English is after they realize you've made an attempt to learn their language.

Just a FYI, From a trip to Germany over a couple of decades ago I remember walking into a couple of stereo shops that sold raw drivers and they had no problem communicating in English.

I know basic german but to research things I know really nothing about written in german is pretty hard. I've visited a few of the so called HiFi speaker shops around my area and they are really nothing more than a Best Buy.

I am always a little hesitant to buy something I'm not too familiar with. I prefer the advice of people who know what they are doing or who have even built a box using said driver.
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