or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Video Components › Home Theater Computers › HTPC - Linux Chat › My next HTPC will be Raspberry Pi
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

My next HTPC will be Raspberry Pi - Page 2

post #31 of 146
ODROID-X is like a quad-core Raspberry Pi for $129
http://www.geek.com/articles/chips/odroid-x-is-like-a-quad-core-raspberry-pi-for-129-20120712/
Quote:
So you’re intrigued by the $35 Raspberry Pi, but just don’t feel like its 700MHz processor will be able to handle your DIY computing needs? Korean company hardkernel has a slightly beefier option for you: the ODROID-X developer board.

The ODROID features a smokin’ fast Samsung Exynos 4412 processor clocked at 1.4GHz — and it also happens to pack four cores. While opinions remain split on whether or not additional cores really make that much difference with most of today’s Android apps, it’s safe to assume that the Cortex-A9-based 4412 is a substantial upgrade over the Pi’s ARM11 chip. And with a Mali-400 GPU on board (like the Samsung Galaxy S3), the ODROID offers plenty of extra multimedia muscle, too.

It’s also got four times as much memory (1GB vs. 256MB) and a whole slew of connectivity options. There are six USB 2.0 ports, Ethernet jack, audio in and out, an SD card reader, and a micro HDMI output. The ODROID (which measures 90 x 94mm) is about twice as wide as the Raspberry Pi, but that’s understandable. All those extra connectors take up space.

Android is supported out of the box, but Ubuntu 12.04 (and presumably other ARM-compatible distributions) run just fine.
post #32 of 146
Gooseberry Launches Android-based Raspberry Pi Rival

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/processor-android-raspberry-pi-gooseberry-arm,16355.html

http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/12/07/20/2358228/gooseberry-launches-android-based-raspberry-pi-rival
Quote:
The Gooseberry Board was announced in a limited production run of 500 units and comes with a 1 GHz overclockable A10 processor, a 400 MHz Mali processor, 4 GB of on-board storage as well as Android 4.03 ICS.

The manufacturer claims that the Gooseberry is "roughly 3 x more powerful in processing power", and twice the RAM (512 MB) than the Raspberry Pi. The Gooseberry does not come with analog video and lacks a LAN port, but supports Wi-Fi. At this time, the board only supports Android 4 ICS and Ubuntu without graphics acceleration. However, Gooseberry is offering premade images for Ubuntu. Support for Arch Linux is "expected in the future".

The Gooseberry Board is offered for 40 British pounds, which translates to about $62. However, the board was sold out within a few hours after launch and there was no information if and when more supply will come online.

It's obvious that boards like this and the Samsung ODROID-X will be common for HTPC use.

At the rate things are going, I could see quad core ARM boards like the ODROID-X replacing x86 HTPC's and desktops for a lot of linux users within a year. The speed and core count of these ARM SoC's will keep increasing moving forward. AFAICT, the crossover point has been reached with the ODROID-X with the quad core 1.4Ghz cpu and 1080p capable GPU.

Someone who agrees-

http://hardware.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=2994217&cid=40721251

Now all we need is a standardized motherboard/CPU socket and BIOS for these ARM cpus and/or ARM SoC's and we have another "PC hardware revolution", without the Wintel monopoly and control.

Once we have standardized form factors and boot process, hopefully ARM distros can be made to run on most ARM setups vs the current need to port/compile for every ARM SoC and board out there now.
Edited by Rgb - 7/22/12 at 5:03am
post #33 of 146
Mele A1000 is a $70 hackable, Linux-friendly ARM-based PC

http://liliputing.com/2012/03/mele-a1000-is-a-70-hackable-linux-friendly-arm-based-pc.html

http://www.mele.cn/en/web/pro_show.aspx?cid=46&pid=60
Quote:
The Raspberry Pi folks have been getting a lot of attention for their $35 PC with an ARM-based processor and support for some open source software. But as the cost of computer components continues to drop, the Raspberry Pi is hardly the only inexpensive PC capable of running Linux.

The Mele A1000 is a system that sells for $70 and up and which features a number of components that the Raspberry Pi lacks — including a SATA port, a case, and a faster processor.

Mele A1000

Powered by a 1 GHz Allwinner A10 ARM Cortex-A8 processor, the Mele A1000 should be noticeably faster than the Raspberry Pi, which has a 700 MHz ARM11 chip.

While the Mele A1000 is described as a TV box, it’s basically a little ARM-based computer with HDMI, VGA, USB, and Ethernet ports, as well as support for an external SATA hard drive.

Ali Express is selling the box for $70 plus shipping, or you can spend $100 to get a version from DealExtreme with a remote control, external hard drive cover, and Android 2.3 software.

Now for the most interesting part (if you happen to be a free software enthusiast): The folks at Rhombus Tech have been working on a free and open source platform based around the Allwinner A10 chip.

The project is entirely GPL compliant, and the goal is to work with a Chinese company to produce a PCMCIA-sized computer which is capable of running Linux-based software without any proprietary, closed source drivers. Rhombus Tech hopes the platform can be used in all sorts of devices including tablets, notebooks, desktop PCs, and in-car systems. Theoretically the price could be as low as $15 per unit… assuming an order size of 100,000. Right now the cost is higher.

But thanks to the efforts of the folks at Rhombus Tech, developers have access to all the drivers needed to make use of any device with the Allwinner A10 processor, and that includes the Mele A1000.

Some folks have already started to port Ubuntu Linux to run on the set-top-box.

With a little more work, it’s not hard to imagine the Mele 1000 becoming a $100 desktop PC running Ubuntu or another Linux distribition, or a media center PC capable of running the new Ubuntu TV software.
post #34 of 146
Nice summary of current ARM/SoC/small Linux PC's and boards

https://raymii.org/cms/p_Small_Linux_PCs_overview
post #35 of 146
Raspian distro

http://www.raspbian.org/
Quote:
Raspbian is a free operating system based on Debian optimized for the Raspberry Pi hardware. An operating system is the set of basic programs and utilities that make your Raspberry Pi run. However, Raspbian provides more than a pure OS: it comes with over 35,000 packages, pre-compiled software bundled in a nice format for easy installation on your Raspberry Pi.
The initial build of over 35,0000 Raspbian packages, optimized for best performance on the Raspberry Pi, was completed in June of 2012. However, Raspbian is still under active development with an emphasis on improving the stability and performance of as many Debian packages as possible.

Download

http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads
post #36 of 146
Thread Starter 
Optional MPEG2 and some other options available for Pi (costs couple quids), see http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/1839
Edited by karrih - 8/24/12 at 11:22pm
post #37 of 146
I bought a Raspberry Pi a few weeks ago and I just wanted to share this with anyone who maybe interested in building a really affordable home theatre pc.

Summary:
Being a Boxee Box owner the last few months and experimenting with XBMC on home PC I'll have to compare it to that for a reference point but overall it performs great! The only down side I can see is the XBMC menu system will not be as lightning fast if you are used to say a $189 Boxee Box or $500 HTPC, but as for the bread and butter stuff like watching high definition video it performs like a champ. I've been using it on my 60" Plasma in the rec room the last few weeks to watch HD Movies, HD TV Shows and Music streamed over the network (via a Linux server) but if you want you can just attach an external USB drive. The XBMC software also allows you watch a insane amount of internet based video shows in simple to use interface.

Parts list:
1 Raspberry Pi Board Model B ($35)
1 HDMI cable ($0 owned one)
1 SD Card (at least 8GB preferred, ($0 owned one)
1 Micro USB Cellphone Charger ($3-5)
1 USB Keyboard/Media Center Remote ($0 owned one)
1 Raspberry Pi Board Case ($10-50 / $0 for DIY models)
1 Raspbmc Installer (Free)

Performance-Rating: 3 out of 5
Value-Rating: 5 out of 5
Overall-Rating: 4 out of 5



DigitalBBQ.net | An online community for older gamers.
Edited by I am Canadian - 9/15/12 at 11:35am
post #38 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rgb View Post

ODROID-X is like a quad-core Raspberry Pi for $129
http://www.geek.com/articles/chips/odroid-x-is-like-a-quad-core-raspberry-pi-for-129-20120712/

A better option may be to wait for $99 Ouya game console which will support XBMC...
Quote:
We just added game streaming through OnLive! Final Fantasy will be on OUYA...and we have an exclusive game! And VEVO has agreed to put their music videos on OUYA, XBMC adds a streaming media app, with TuneIn and iHeartRadio adding music!

There is a good video and info here>>>



Specifications:

Tegra3 quad-core processor
1GB RAM
8GB of internal flash storage
HDMI connection to the TV, with support for up to 1080p HD
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth LE 4.0
USB 2.0 (one)
Wireless controller with standard controls (two analog sticks, d-pad, eight action buttons, a system button), a touchpad
Android 4.0
ETHERNET! (Announced by Muffi 7/18)




DigitalBBQ.net | An online community for older gamers.
post #39 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rgb View Post

ODROID-X is like a quad-core Raspberry Pi for $129
http://www.geek.com/articles/chips/odroid-x-is-like-a-quad-core-raspberry-pi-for-129-20120712/

A better option may be to wait for $99 Ouya game console which will support XBMC...
Quote:
We just added game streaming through OnLive! Final Fantasy will be on OUYA...and we have an exclusive game! And VEVO has agreed to put their music videos on OUYA, XBMC adds a streaming media app, with TuneIn and iHeartRadio adding music!

There is a good video and info here>>>



Specifications:

Tegra3 quad-core processor
1GB RAM
8GB of internal flash storage
HDMI connection to the TV, with support for up to 1080p HD
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth LE 4.0
USB 2.0 (one)
Wireless controller with standard controls (two analog sticks, d-pad, eight action buttons, a system button), a touchpad
Android 4.0
ETHERNET! (Announced by Muffi 7/18)




DigitalBBQ.net | An online community for older gamers.
post #40 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by I am Canadian View Post

A better option may be to wait for $99 Ouya game console which will support XBMC...
There is a good video and info here>>>

Specifications:
Tegra3 quad-core processor
1GB RAM
8GB of internal flash storage
HDMI connection to the TV, with support for up to 1080p HD
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth LE 4.0
USB 2.0 (one)
Wireless controller with standard controls (two analog sticks, d-pad, eight action buttons, a system button), a touchpad
Android 4.0
ETHERNET! (Announced by Muffi 7/18)
DigitalBBQ.net | An online community for older gamers.

Yes, the Ouya looks promising- just hope it isn't another failed Kickstarter project, reaching for too much at too low a price point. Also, releasing it on time is important- if delayed even 6 months, the CPU will be obsoleted by Tegra4 /Tegra5 and/or something else (new faster OMAPs, ODROID-X Exynos 4412 successor, etc) . Hopefully Ouya can make a running change or new version quickly when needed. Just another example why we need the creation of a standard ARM architecture/socket/motherboard form factor/BIOs like we have on x86.

Hey, maybe its time for a Kickstarter to create such a standard ARM motherboard/CPU/GPU/BIOs infrastructure, to give us the depth and breadth of DIY choices we have with x86/x64. biggrin.gif

OTOH, with the low cost of complete functioning boards/boxes like ODROID-X, Ouya, and hopefully faster more powerful Raspberry Pi's, maybe the point is moot, but driver support and distro maintainability could be improved with ARM standardization.
Edited by Rgb - 9/24/12 at 5:59am
post #41 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by I am Canadian View Post

XBMC software also allows you watch a insane amount of internet based video shows in simple to use interface.
Are you referring to video shows XBMC can use in a default install or through plugins? Examples?
post #42 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by I am Canadian View Post

A better option may be to wait for $99 Ouya game console which will support XBMC...
There is a good video and info here>>>

Specifications:
Tegra3 quad-core processor
1GB RAM
8GB of internal flash storage
HDMI connection to the TV, with support for up to 1080p HD
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth LE 4.0
USB 2.0 (one)
Wireless controller with standard controls (two analog sticks, d-pad, eight action buttons, a system button), a touchpad
Android 4.0
ETHERNET! (Announced by Muffi 7/18)
DigitalBBQ.net | An online community for older gamers.

Looks like the Ouya CPU/GPU will be obsoleted at release-

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/nvidia-tegra-4-wayne-arm-a15,15261.html
Quote:
Slated for a Q1 2013 release, the processor will arrive with four 28 nm ARM A15 cores and a clock speed of 1.8 GHz on the high-end for 10-inch tablet and notebook devices. A 2 GHz and a 1.2 GHz - 1.8 GHz version will follow in Q3, while there will also be an ARM A9 version with 1.2 to 2.0 GHz that will feature the Icera LTE100 / HSPA42 baseband chip and will be made available for 7-inch devices.

Tegra 4 was originally promised to arrive this year, but has been delayed to 2013. Market rumors suggest that the delay of Wayne could be due to Nvidia's decision to build Kepler GPU technology into these devices. The chip is promised to deliver about 10 times the performance of Tegra 2 on the high-end - and twice the performance of Tegra 3. With at least four different version on tap, Nvidia is aggressively broadening the market reach of Tegra.

Maybe Tegra3 will be "enough", but with all the Tegra4 devices on shelves by Q1/Q2 next year, people might feel short changed at launch. If Ouya can deliver at the promised price, it may still be an interesting piece.

IMO, quad core at 1.6Ghz or higher is a "minimum", assuming a good GPU, for any machine I might buy/build (mobo, netbook, notebook, etc)
post #43 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by I am Canadian View Post

I bought a Raspberry Pi a few weeks ago and I just wanted to share this with anyone who maybe interested in building a really affordable home theatre pc.
Summary:
Being a Boxee Box owner the last few months and experimenting with XBMC on home PC I'll have to compare it to that for a reference point but overall it performs great! The only down side I can see is the XBMC menu system will not be as lightning fast if you are used to say a $189 Boxee Box or $500 HTPC, but as for the bread and butter stuff like watching high definition video it performs like a champ. I've been using it on my 60" Plasma in the rec room the last few weeks to watch HD Movies, HD TV Shows and Music streamed over the network (via a Linux server) but if you want you can just attach an external USB drive. The XBMC software also allows you watch a insane amount of internet based video shows in simple to use interface.
Parts list:
1 Raspberry Pi Board Model B ($35)
1 HDMI cable ($0 owned one)
1 SD Card (at least 8GB preferred, ($0 owned one)
1 Micro USB Cellphone Charger ($3-5)
1 USB Keyboard/Media Center Remote ($0 owned one)
1 Raspberry Pi Board Case ($10-50 / $0 for DIY models)
1 Raspbmc Installer (Free)
Performance-Rating: 3 out of 5
Value-Rating: 5 out of 5
Overall-Rating: 4 out of 5
DigitalBBQ.net | An online community for older gamers.

Thanks for this write up...exactly what I want to do and expecting my PI to be here tomorrow...looking forward to hacking around with it this weekend!
post #44 of 146
I bought a Raspberry Pi Model "B" (mine came with 512mb ram). I have been playing with both Raspbian and RaspBMC (XBMC).

The trouble is, I would like to watch some shows online. We also have an Amazon prime account, which includes prime videos. Most online video requires Flash, and as far as I can tell Flash is not available for the ARM CPU in the R-Pi.

In Raspbian, I installed the Chromium browser. I then went to http://www.youtube.com/html5, but it said my browser didn't support h.264 or WebM. I know some networks are moving towards HTML5 to support iOS for mobile video content. I was hoping I could piggy-back on this to watch video on the R-Pi.

I know that I could also "acquire" h.264 video files, but I am trying to be above board here.

I am contemplating selling my R-Pi to someone at work, and just going with something like a Roku, or another all-in-one system that would have better support for both HTML5 & Flash video. Is that my best bet?
post #45 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by spec1alk View Post

I bought a Raspberry Pi Model "B" (mine came with 512mb ram). I have been playing with both Raspbian and RaspBMC (XBMC).
The trouble is, I would like to watch some shows online. We also have an Amazon prime account, which includes prime videos. Most online video requires Flash, and as far as I can tell Flash is not available for the ARM CPU in the R-Pi.

Did you try the Amazon Prime plugin for XBMC? I didn't have any problem with using the youtube plugin on the PI via XBMC.
post #46 of 146
Another nail in the Ouya/RPi coffins-

http://store.cloudsto.com/dual-core-rikomagic-mk802-iii/rikomagic-dual-core-mk802-iii-4gb-flash-dhl-express-shipping-175-detail.html
Quote:
Technical Specifications

Model MK802 III Dual Core
CPU RK3066 Dual Core - Cortex-A9 Up to 1.6GHz
GPU Quad- Core 2D/ 3D/ OpenGL ES2.0(AMD Z430)/ OpenVG1
OS Android 4.1
RAM 1GB DDR3
Memory 4GB Flash
Expansion Micro SD T-Flash(Maximum support 32GB)
Video Format WMV/ASF/MP4/3GP/3G2M4V/AVI/MJPEG/RV10/DivX/VC-1/MPEG-2/MPEG-4/H.263/H.264/1280*720P HD 30 fps, 1080P/720*480 D1 30fps
Audio Format MP3/WMA/APE/FLAC/AAC/OGG/AC3/WAV
Picture format Max.8000x8000 JPEG BMP GIF PNG
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Flash Supports flash 11.1
Ports HDMI(male),Micro SD slot, USB host (full sizeUSB), USB power port(micro USB); LED(Blue)
Unit Size (mm) 90mm*40mm*13mm

The market for these HDMI stick Android PC's is exploding. There will be quad core sticks soon, most likely. These sticks can do everything the Ouya can do and more, at lower cost.
post #47 of 146
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rgb View Post

Another nail in the RPi coffins.

Don't underestimate the power of the forc, er, open source.
post #48 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by karrih View Post

Don't underestimate the power of the forc, er, open source.

...Power of The Source biggrin.gif

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOLrVHM1kbo

Didn't mean to imply a failure of the FOSS model re: RPi, or even that the *idea* of the RPi is flawed (I.e. community based low cost open-ish ARM hardware) just that the RPi is underpowered for video media PC usage. There are/will be better/faster FOSS compatible ARM boards and ARM computers like the HDMI stick computers I linked earlier.

Hopefully more community hardware projects like RPi will sprout, with better GPU selection re: FOSS driver support.

FOSS is the Raison d'être for all these ARM devices (most run the Linux kernel, Android or otherwise), fercrissakes smile.gif
post #49 of 146
Thread Starter 
I think you have to choose what you want to do and then decide if solution X or Y or Z is underpowered for you. Obviously RPi wont do much sw picture processing if that is what you need. There was interesting discussion elsewhere about hevc algorithms and how that seems to be too much for just about anything right now.
post #50 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by spec1alk View Post

I bought a Raspberry Pi Model "B" (mine came with 512mb ram). I have been playing with both Raspbian and RaspBMC (XBMC).
The trouble is, I would like to watch some shows online. We also have an Amazon prime account, which includes prime videos. Most online video requires Flash, and as far as I can tell Flash is not available for the ARM CPU in the R-Pi.
In Raspbian, I installed the Chromium browser. I then went to http://www.youtube.com/html5, but it said my browser didn't support h.264 or WebM. I know some networks are moving towards HTML5 to support iOS for mobile video content. I was hoping I could piggy-back on this to watch video on the R-Pi.
I know that I could also "acquire" h.264 video files, but I am trying to be above board here.
I am contemplating selling my R-Pi to someone at work, and just going with something like a Roku, or another all-in-one system that would have better support for both HTML5 & Flash video. Is that my best bet?

 

I have only been fooling around with my R-Pi for a week or so, but I can say this ... I could never get Raspian or RaspBMC to work without severe sluggishness.    I switched to OpenElec and have had smooth sailing ever since.    Here is an article with details on how to get Amazon Prime and Hulu on your R-Pi XBMC build ...

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/113491/how-to-get-hulu-and-amazon-video-on-xbmc/

 

I have watched a couple of Amazon Prime videos with no problems on my R-Pi.   

 

I have no doubt that this thing has MAJOR limitations, but for my usage so far, MPEG2 (paid $3 for license), .TS (full BD rips), .MKV, it has played everything just fine.    Totally worth the $38 I spent.   It looks like the newest OpenElec 3.0 build will also fix some audio issues.   But if you are mainly interested in online streaming, it seems like a cheap Roku would be the easy choice.  

post #51 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by edpowers View Post

I have no doubt that this thing has MAJOR limitations, but for my usage so far, MPEG2 (paid $3 for license), .TS (full BD rips), .MKV, it has played everything just fine.    Totally worth the $38 I spent.   It looks like the newest OpenElec 3.0 build will also fix some audio issues.   But if you are mainly interested in online streaming, it seems like a cheap Roku would be the easy choice.  

Did you also purchase the VC-1 decoder for BD rip playback? I keep mine in an mkv container, but a majority are vc-1

I'm hoping all of the "RPi can't handle high bitrate" comments were only true without the vc-1 decoder. Is your mpeg2 content from dvds or recordings?
post #52 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark_Slayer View Post


Did you also purchase the VC-1 decoder for BD rip playback? I keep mine in an mkv container, but a majority are vc-1
I'm hoping all of the "RPi can't handle high bitrate" comments were only true without the vc-1 decoder. Is your mpeg2 content from dvds or recordings?

 

I have not purchased the VC-1 decoder yet, but likely will in the near future.  None of the handful of the BD rips I've played on the RPi were VC-1.    All of my mpeg2 files are DVD rip .isos.   Some movie-only and some with full DVD menus.  The .iso movies with full dvd menus have worked just fine as well.    I haven't tried any BD menus because I don't have any of them (nor do I have any need for them).

post #53 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by edpowers View Post

I have not purchased the VC-1 decoder yet, but likely will in the near future.  None of the handful of the BD rips I've played on the RPi were VC-1.    All of my mpeg2 files are DVD rip .isos.   Some movie-only and some with full DVD menus.  The .iso movies with full dvd menus have worked just fine as well.    I haven't tried any BD menus because I don't have any of them (nor do I have any need for them).

I'm not real familiar with OpenELEC, but am I understanding you in that it has menu support for DVD's (and possible BD's)? I'm using an XBox360 as an extender on my WMC, but it doesn't support menus (or of course high bit rate content). I've been looking to add another device to handle those.
post #54 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncarty97 View Post


I'm not real familiar with OpenELEC, but am I understanding you in that it has menu support for DVD's (and possible BD's)? I'm using an XBox360 as an extender on my WMC, but it doesn't support menus (or of course high bit rate content). I've been looking to add another device to handle those.

 

Yes, the R-Pi with OpenELEC supports DVD menus, at least with the ones that I have tried in .iso format.   I have no idea if it supports BD menus.  

post #55 of 146
No BD menu support yet, but I thought that DVD menu support was disabled by default

Did you do anything special to turn it on, or just use the Menu button from the on-screen info during playback? It doesn't launch directly to the menu first, correct?
post #56 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark_Slayer View Post

No BD menu support yet, but I thought that DVD menu support was disabled by default
Did you do anything special to turn it on, or just use the Menu button from the on-screen info during playback? It doesn't launch directly to the menu first, correct?

No, I didn't do anything special to turn on menu support in OpenELEC 3.0 beta.   It launched directly to the menu.   All of my menu .isos are kids TV shows.   The most recent one I tried was a Curious George .iso.   It launches right into the main menu and I can navigate around to select epidodes, etc., with no problem.   

post #57 of 146
Forgive my ignorance guys, but how does it handle the blu-rays if it doesn't support menus? Would I need to manually select the file that represents the movie or does it just launch the biggest file in the folder or something? Thanks!
post #58 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by edpowers View Post

No, I didn't do anything special to turn on menu support in OpenELEC 3.0 beta.   It launched directly to the menu.   All of my menu .isos are kids TV shows.   The most recent one I tried was a Curious George .iso.   It launches right into the main menu and I can navigate around to select epidodes, etc., with no problem.   

Thanks for clarifying. I didn't realize it worked that way for DVDs
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncarty97 View Post

Forgive my ignorance guys, but how does it handle the blu-rays if it doesn't support menus? Would I need to manually select the file that represents the movie or does it just launch the biggest file in the folder or something? Thanks!

For now it just plays the main title. I don't know how it would handle BD-J discs like Star Wars or John Carter. Also, I've only tested playback in XBMC Frodo beta 2 in Windows, not OE 3.0 but I would think it is close to the same. So far I've only got the OE3 Beta playing livetv from an NPVR server client and normal network shares, but on a g630/h61 instead of an RPi
post #59 of 146
XBMC 12.0 (OpenELEC 3.0) has support for non-Java bu-ray menus. For instance I can access the full menu on my Dave Matthews & Tim Reynolds: Live at Radio City Music Hall blu-ray, which is handy for selecting specifics songs from the set list. You're out of luck for Java based menus though. I have AnyDVD automatically remove those and replace them with AnyDVD's Speedmenu.
post #60 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by lockdown571 View Post

XBMC 12.0 (OpenELEC 3.0) has support for non-Java bu-ray menus. For instance I can access the full menu on my Dave Matthews & Tim Reynolds: Live at Radio City Music Hall blu-ray, which is handy for selecting specifics songs from the set list. You're out of luck for Java based menus though. I have AnyDVD automatically remove those and replace them with AnyDVD's Speedmenu.

I've never tired that (though I've used AnyDVD for years). Might give that a shot.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: HTPC - Linux Chat
AVS › AVS Forum › Video Components › Home Theater Computers › HTPC - Linux Chat › My next HTPC will be Raspberry Pi