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Panamorph P752...how much time?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi guys,

I just purchased a P752 lens on-line and I just received and noticed that there's a bit of oil. I've already read up on the lens about it loosing oil is not a good sign. I was wondering how long I have before the lens is completely finished. Is there anything that can be done to even slow it down?
post #2 of 14
It's just mineral oil. If the leak isn't bothering you, I guess you can fill it back up. Some carefull cleaning and silicone and oyu may be able to stop the leak.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GetGray View Post

It's just mineral oil. If the leak isn't bothering you, I guess you can fill it back up. Some carefull cleaning and silicone and oyu may be able to stop the leak.

Ok, so there is a "way" to fill it up...somewhat? I might just try and see where it's leaking and try to stop it. I am more worried about how long I have until I really see a bad image. It is not a major leak, one part of the outer lens, get's a little sweaty.
post #4 of 14
I'd find the leak, then empty it first before attempting to seal the leak. Clean the outside so that you don't have any oily residue to prevent the adhesive from sticking and re-fill using a syringe fed in from the top.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVX View Post

I'd find the leak, then empty it first before attempting to seal the leak. Clean the outside so that you don't have any oily residue to prevent the adhesive from sticking and re-fill using a syringe fed in from the top.

What type of oil does this piece use?
post #6 of 14
It should be a very fine mineral oil.
post #7 of 14
If it is new I would send it back for warntee. Why mess with it.
post #8 of 14
They stopped making that lens about 10 years ago. It was one of the first.
post #9 of 14
Oil was chosen because it would not 'go off' like some other liquids do, but I think its problem is that it breaks down the rubber used to seal the prisms. This certainly was the case with all the DIY attempts at making oil filled prisms (about 10 years ago). You could even use glycerol if you can find the right one. Just some are said to be 'volatile' in bright light which is something you want to avoid given where the lens will sit when in use.
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
I actually got it for my dad, gave him my 2.35 screen and wanted to project on the full screen. He's got a 720p InFocus PJ and didn't want to spend alot of money. I managed to have found the P752 on audiogon for roughly 300$. I figured it would last him until he get's a new PJ. I think after he see's how amazing it is, I think he'll go all out on a new lens for his next PJ.

Thanks CAVX for all the info, much appreciated. I'll let you know when he'll be looking for his next lens.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hey Guys, I feel a little sheepish asking this, but I'm helping my dad setup the lens and it was a little bit more tricky then I thought it was going to be. I found a user on the forum who had an IN76 with the P752 lens and used the projector presets (4:3, 16:9) as the scaler.

How does one setup an anamorphic lens? Any help is very much appreciated.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by e39mofo View Post

Hey Guys, I feel a little sheepish asking this, but I'm helping my dad setup the lens and it was a little bit more tricky then I thought it was going to be.

All adapters can be tricky

Quote:
Originally Posted by e39mofo View Post

I found a user on the forum who had an IN76 with the P752 lens and used the projector presets (4:3, 16:9) as the scaler.

Yep, the easiest method is to use the projector. 4:3 mode is used for 16:9 and Letter Box will be used for Scope. If you use the 16:9 mode and do not have another means to Scale, the image geometry will be out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by e39mofo View Post

How does one setup an anamorphic lens? Any help is very much appreciated.

For a VC, you must have the projector far enough back so that the native image (16:9) width is the same as the Scope screen. You then add the VC which compresses the image down to fit the height. What you might find is that the amount of tilt can actually increase or decrease the amount of compression the lens applies. This will require you to have a screen set up in place so that you have a point of reference.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
I see. I guess I need to bring the projector back enough to fill the scope screen in 16:9 so that it fills the screen and the lens will compress the top and bottom to fit the image properly....correct?
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by e39mofo View Post

I see. I guess I need to bring the projector back enough to fill the scope screen in 16:9 so that it fills the screen and the lens will compress the top and bottom to fit the image properly....correct?

Correct. Move the projector back first. You may have to use some zoom, but only do so as the last resort after running out of throw.
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