or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Wii U - Page 12  

post #331 of 1142
Mongo - The 3DS XL comes with an AC adapter in the US.
post #332 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThisOneKidMongo View Post

Really, anyone who thinks this thing is gonna come packed with a Gamepad, Wiimote, nunchuck and pro controller is dreaming. Since the N64 days, it's sort of been an unspoken rule that as long as a system offers a complete single-player experience out of the box, consumers can't complain. It's understood that if you want to play with multiple people, you'll have to cough up the cash for extra controllers. And yeah, the Wii U is same-room multiplayer-centric, but I'm sure Nintendoland will offer enough pass-and-play multiplayer to cover that angle. The Wii U will come with Nintendoland, one Gamepad, and that's it.
Sounds right to me. The Wii came with ports for Gamecube controllers, but it didn't come with the controllers themselves. And the whole sell for Wii U is the GamePad. It would just confuse people more and increase the cost of the console to include Wii Remotes.

Besides, Nintendo discovered that selling "extra" controllers and peripherals with new games is a sure recipe for success: Wii Fit sold like gangbusters, Wii Play sold more Wii Remotes than anything, Wii Sports Resort sold the redesigned remote with Wii Motion Plus, and Monster Hunter Tri sold a ton of the Classic Controller. I imagine that the new Xbox-style controller and additional "newly designed" Wii Remotes will get packed in with other games down the road.
post #333 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThisOneKidMongo View Post

I'd put money on Nintendoland being a pack-in and a Wiimote not. This is the same company that will not be including an AC adapter with the 3DS XL under the reasoning that most buyers already have an adapter from the original 3DS. The Wii U will likely already be sold at a loss, so they'll cut costs where they can. Besides, Wiimote support on the Wii U mostly seems to be a concession to attract/placate the millions of current Wii owners who might otherwise feel burned by a mid-cycle console launch; it's not a big selling point to totally new customers so including it in the box seems unnecessary.
Really, anyone who thinks this thing is gonna come packed with a Gamepad, Wiimote, nunchuck and pro controller is dreaming. Since the N64 days, it's sort of been an unspoken rule that as long as a system offers a complete single-player experience out of the box, consumers can't complain. It's understood that if you want to play with multiple people, you'll have to cough up the cash for extra controllers. And yeah, the Wii U is same-room multiplayer-centric, but I'm sure Nintendoland will offer enough pass-and-play multiplayer to cover that angle. The Wii U will come with Nintendoland, one Gamepad, and that's it.

I totally disagree. If the Wii U comes with only the game pad and no traditional Wii remotes, there is no way that Nintendoland is the pack in game. Only one of the games from Nintendoland demos required only the use of the game pad alone. I can't imagine that Nintendo would ever release a pack in game that you couldn't completely play with what they give you out of the box. I would think that Nintendoland would more likely be like Wii Play and include a Wii remote. Of course, if the Wii remote is in the box with the Wii U from the get go, then all bets are off.

Regardless, if there is a pack in game, I would hope that it is the Mario U game. I don't really have any interest in Nintendoland. Ideally, a voucher for one out of a selection of launch games as a free download would be the best thing to me.
post #334 of 1142
BearHunter wins, because his post contains logic.
post #335 of 1142
Despite my total lack of understanding of gaming industry marketing, I still think two things:

1) If Nintendo cheaps out (ala the Japanese market, 'no power adapter for you!' model) the WiiU fails. We're all waiting to see how to use this thing, a solid pack-in game is required for that to happen at this point.

b) NintendoLand might be the greatest DLC idea ever. Say Ninty gives us the game, gratis, with the system. Then every time a new game releases they shoot off a new NL ride/level/world/whatever based on new releases. Pay or free, doesn't matter, I'd have eaten up a new Galaxy 2-inspired Wii bowling level.


I could be wrong (ask anyone here, they'll give you examples), but Nintnedo could really -really- change my and many others' opinion with a couple good strategy moves here.
post #336 of 1142
If they hope this takes off with consumers that have left Nintendo in recent generations, they're going to have to include appropriate motion controllers. If not, the viability of motion gaming is going to dwindle on their upcoming platform when developers can't be guaranteed that every consumer has the necessary controller for their project. Furthermore, a large percentage of Wiimotes out there aren't Motion Plus equipped with many consumers not even having a single Motion Plus equipped Wiimote. If a developer can't count on at least a single Motion Plus equipped Wiimote shipping with each console, the situation where Motion Plus support was the last few years is going to be little changed on the Wii U.

While I have no doubt this Pro Controller won't be bundled in, I just don't see how they're going to get away from bundling in at least a Wiimote with this thing. It needs it so all Wii U purchasers will have the controllers they're going to need just to play single player motion projects in the future, so publishers can count on everyone having the controller they need (Rather than an optional controller like a Classic Controller or Pro Controller) out of the box, and so everyone has at least one Motion Plus equipped Wiimote.

The question mark in my mind is the nunchuck. A lot of the Wii software I played that used both at the same time seemed better suited for a dual analog gamepad. So I think the inclusion of a nunchuck isn't guaranteed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BearHuntr View Post

I totally disagree. If the Wii U comes with only the game pad and no traditional Wii remotes, there is no way that Nintendoland is the pack in game. Only one of the games from Nintendoland demos required only the use of the game pad alone....

Granted I didn't watch things start to finish so I perhaps didn't see what you noticed, but what I saw had one player using the gamepad with the multiplayer rosters filled out with Wiimotes (The Luigi's Mansion minigame is what they seemed to focus on).

I didn't see anything that didn't seem like it would work just fine in single player with just the gamepad.

And as Wii Sports showed, just because a game is aimed at multiplayer and best suited for multiplayer, it doesn't mean they're going to include the necessary controllers to get at least 2 person multiplayer going out of the box.
Quote:
Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post

Next to Nintendoland, the only other pack-in possibility would be New Super Mario Bros U. Everything else is either too niche (Pikmin 3), requires a peripheral (Wii Fit U), or is a third-party title.
As much as I'd rather see NSMBU as the pack-in, Nintendoland can't stand on its own two feet without a console to go with it.

While I'd much rather see NSMBU be the pack-in, you just described why it won't. NintendoLand is only going to succeed if it's included with the system. And NSMBU seems to be about the only launch window title Nintendo can count on appealing to the vast majority of their customers.

So they're going to want to sell NSMU to us for $59.99, no doubt, and use NintendoLand to demonstrate to consumers the possibilities this console has to offer by bundling it in.
Edited by Leo_Ames - 6/28/12 at 2:41am
post #337 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo_Ames View Post

While I'd much rather see NSMBU be the pack-in, you just described why it won't. NintendoLand is only going to succeed if it's included with the system. And NSMBU seems to be about the only launch window title Nintendo can count on appealing to the vast majority of their customers.
So they're going to want to sell that to us for $59.99, no doubt, and use NintendoLand to demonstrate to consumers the possibilities this console has to offer.
Which suggests to me that they'll sell NSMBU bundled with a Wii Remote, and just include the GamePad with the console and Nintendoland. The new Pro Controller will probably get bundled with a multiplatform shooter release.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BearHuntr 
Only one of the games from Nintendoland demos required only the use of the game pad alone.
Explain. I must have missed the details. Like Leo, I thought the Wii Remotes were only being used for multiplayer.
post #338 of 1142
Again with the failure in logic. NSMBU is a strong enough product that it will sell on it's own. It doesn't need to be bundled with anything to do sell extremely well for the next five years straight. As such, it won't be bundled with anything. It isn't Skyward Sword, which has a vastly smaller potential market than it did when it started development, and was further hobbled by requiring a special version of the Wii Remote that didn't ship with the initial system.
post #339 of 1142
NSMBU is fully compatible with the standard WiiU gamepad. So I don't see the point of bundling it with a Wiimote that isn't necessary for the game so I doubt it will happen.

If there is any game package bundled with a Wiimote for the WiiU, it's going to probably follow the thrend of Wii Play and Wii Play: Motion and be a collection of multiplayer games that most would ignore on its own but many would be willing to pay $5-$10 more for if it came bundled with a controller they were looking to buy anyways for multiplayer.

And the same for shooters. The standard WiiU gamepad has everything one would need so there really isn't a need to bundle it with the Pro controller (Although it wouldn't surprise me to see a few special editions include one themed to the product they're selling).
Edited by Leo_Ames - 6/28/12 at 2:49am
post #340 of 1142
I was reading an interview yesterday with the Nintendo France president who, when asked about a pack-in Wii Remote, said they're still finalizing what will be in the box, but pointed out that there are already "over 200 million Wii remotes out in the world." Maybe if negative buzz keeps up, they'll feel obliged to include one as a goodwill gesture? Personally, I hope they don't. I already have three or four of the things and don't need more chunks of plastic taking up room in my apartment, so I'd rather keep costs down.

I wonder if Nintendo would consider going the multiple-SKU route at launch? Say, Wii U + Gamepad and nothing else for $250, Wii U + Gamepad + Wiimote/Nintendoland for $300? I'd be happy with a lower-priced, no-pack-in option, because Nintendoland doesn't interest me, and much of my fun with the Wii/3DS for the first month of purchase was just from playing around with the pre-installed software anyway...
post #341 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThisOneKidMongo View Post

I wonder if Nintendo would consider going the multiple-SKU route at launch?.

Has Nintendo done a multi-SKU launch before? It doesn't seem like their style.
post #342 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo_Ames View Post

NSMBU is fully compatible with the standard WiiU gamepad. So I don't see the point of bundling it with a Wiimote that isn't necessary for the game so I doubt it will happen.
More than any other, it's been the game they've been hyping for "asymmetric multiplayer."
post #343 of 1142
On a related note, I saw over @ IGN last night that NSMBU will have DLC - players will be able to buy/download new Mario levels, according to Nintendo.
post #344 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post

Which suggests to me that they'll sell NSMBU bundled with a Wii Remote, and just include the GamePad with the console and Nintendoland. The new Pro Controller will probably get bundled with a multiplatform shooter release.
Explain. I must have missed the details. Like Leo, I thought the Wii Remotes were only being used for multiplayer.
Ok, I'll concede that there may be compelling single-player versions of the Nintendoland games, but they sure weren't pushing that in any presentations so far. All we saw were games that focused on one person using the gamepad and others using the Wii Remotes. Would these games have the same punch as single-player? Either way, time will tell. As it is, I'm hoping for no pack-in, but rather a download code for any Nintendo title.
post #345 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by BearHuntr View Post

As it is, I'm hoping for no pack-in, but rather a download code for any Nintendo title.
It would be a great way for Nintendo to break in a new day-and-date download initiative. Not a bad idea. Doubt it would happen, though, since a large chunk of Nintendo's userbase isn't connected.
post #346 of 1142
Yeah, and no way they're gonna let us choose a free game at launch, download or otherwise, rather than a pack-in.
post #347 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post

More than any other, it's been the game they've been hyping for "asymmetric multiplayer."

How so?

That a young child can hold the WiiU pad and drop blocks is something that seems to have been mentioned almost in passing and almost as an afterthought.

Actual competitive multiplayer will be "symmetric". Heck, they take it so far that characters don't even have different capabilities. I think that's why this game (And NSMBWii) utilize generic toads to fill out a multiplayer roster since if people saw unique characters like Luigi and Peach in a Mario platformer, people have grown to expect them to have different capabilities than Mario. Yet Nintendo wants equality.

You'll be using a couple of different buttons, a d-pad, and a tiny bit of motion just like NSMBWii with both the gamepad and Wiimotes. The only thing asymmetric here is the option for a young child to assist or annoy the people playing the game by tapping the touch screen of the Wii U to place blocks.

In other words, it's something many will never even use (And many of us only once in a while when playing with a 6 or 7 year old).
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwebb1970 View Post

On a related note, I saw over @ IGN last night that NSMBU will have DLC - players will be able to buy/download new Mario levels, according to Nintendo.

Not for the main game though I hear. It's for some coin challenge mode.

So I suspect many of us will be ignoring it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BearHuntr View Post

Ok, I'll concede that there may be compelling single-player versions of the Nintendoland games, but they sure weren't pushing that in any presentations so far. All we saw were games that focused on one person using the gamepad and others using the Wii Remotes. Would these games have the same punch as single-player? Either way, time will tell. As it is, I'm hoping for no pack-in, but rather a download code for any Nintendo title.

And if you go back to when Wii Sports was unveiled, they concentrated on multiplayer. Yet when the Wii shipped, it shipped with just a single Wiimote and nunchuck for single player action.

I don't see the logic that because NintendoLand is multiplayer focused that it couldn't be the pack-in without a Wiimote being included for two player gaming (Although I feel safe in thinking it's going to include a Wiimote just as a guarantee for publishers that every WiiU can support full motion gaming).

How many retail Wii games shipped that couldn't be played just with a nunchuck and Wiimote? As far as I'm aware, besides Wii Fit (Which came with the balance board, didn't it?) and the sequel (I think it had two SKU's, one with the board and one without for those that had the first), the total is 0.

Ship the Wii U without a Wiimote and it's going to cause issues for some consumers (Not every Wii U buyer is going to be a Wii owner, many Wii owners have sold their system off, and Nintendo seems to want to recapture gamers that have left Nintendo in recent generations that never owned a Wii). And it's going to make motion gaming difficult for publishers as well. The lack of a guarantee that every WiiU owner has what they need to play your game in single player is going to be the kiss of death for motion gaming. And with so many regular Wiimotes out there, not including a Motion Plus equipped Wiimote is going to cause Motion Plus to be about as accepted on the WiiU as it was on the Wii. An awful lot of those 90 million+ Wii's out there lack a single Motion Plus equipped Wiimote.

As far as I see it, it has to ship with a Motion Plus Wiimote or cause severe damage to motion gaming on their platform.
Edited by Leo_Ames - 6/28/12 at 10:11pm
post #348 of 1142
One of the potential problems, though, is that there's already a big tendency to confuse the Wii U as a "peripheral" for the Wii. Multiple press outlets have already been confused and referred to the Wii U as a peripheral for the Wii (and even Jimmy Fallon made that mistake when Reggie himself was a guest!). They have to differentiate the Wii U as much as possible from the Wii, because clearly Nintendo has gone too far in the direction of making them seem similar (same peripherals, same IPs, similar features).

Would packing in a Wii Remote make that even more confusing? Tough to say. And so far, Nintendo has been surprisingly tone-deaf to that potential for confusion. So who knows.
post #349 of 1142
The "to pack or not to pack a wiimote" question is indicative of the whole problem with the wii U. We all know Nintendo needs the casual audience, and we all know the gamepad isn't going to play well to them. So far what they've shown is everything that the Wii wasn't - they made a simple controller to bring in a non-traditional audience in, and it worked better than anyone could imagine. And their follow up is literally the most complicated controller ever conceived.

Most of the reason why people are having a hard time understanding what the Wii U is, is because this as a follow up makes no sense. It's as if Pixar made "Finding Nemo U", and it was a dark, live action movie from the perspective of a shark, trying to find and eat Nemo and his whole family. Not only is it absolutely insane, but if it was real, no one would believe it was anything more than a sideshow, an experiment. It would appeal to nobody but a few hardcore pixar fans, who will see anything they make.

What should have been packed in is a Wiimote 2. The gamepad is a dead end. They can at least salvage some of their uniqueness by packing in a Wiimote plus.
post #350 of 1142
I disagree that the Gamepad is overly complicated, or unfriendly to casuals. It's basically an oversized DS, which proved quite popular with the non-hardcore. If anything, physical buttons are what scare off casual gamers, as due to iPhones and tablets touchscreens have basically become shorthand for "user-friendly."
post #351 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThisOneKidMongo View Post

I disagree that the Gamepad is overly complicated, or unfriendly to casuals. It's basically an oversized DS, which proved quite popular with the non-hardcore. If anything, physical buttons are what scare off casual gamers, as due to iPhones and tablets touchscreens have basically become shorthand for "user-friendly."
I agree. The GamePad is pretty simple and straightforward. It IS just like a DS, which is one of the best selling gaming devices/consoles ever. Casuals had no problem with that.

The confusion has come from the mixed messaging out of Nintendo. By trying to pitch to two audiences, they're confusing everyone. Adding in all these other controllers, still no word on network features, this "asymmetric" nonsense, and so on, is only making it even more unnecessarily complicated.
post #352 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post

I agree. The GamePad is pretty simple and straightforward.

Even more to the point, it's like an iPad, android tablet or smart phone. I don't really see the GamePad as the stumbling block here. Like you say, the confused marketing is the problem.
post #353 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by WizarDru View Post

Even more to the point, it's like an iPad, android tablet or smart phone. I don't really see the GamePad as the stumbling block here. Like you say, the confused marketing is the problem.

Yeah, it's simple. It's a tablet. They showed how it could be used for casual games like Just Dance where it was used by one player to select the upcoming dance moves. It's not cutting out the casual game with wii remotes, just supplementing it. If it will drive casuals to the console, I don't know, but it's certainly not a hurdle. It gives people a cheap tablet and game console. If they have a f2p market with stuff like Zynga games, I can see it being a draw.

Personally, I like the controller. One problem for me with the Wii was I felt the remote was more of a nuisance than anything in a lot of games. The gamepad is just a big controller with a screen in the middle. It gives the core gamer a cool controller and wiimotes will still be there for the casual crowd.

Their marketing has sucked, but the console isn't coming out for a while either. I'm sure we'll see in the fall how they are going to try to push this thing once commercials start coming out and they try to get it into the mainstream press. But it doesn't seem that hard. Make a hard push to casuals with the hey it's a tablet idea and show the core crowd some good looking first party games that will be coming.
post #354 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monger View Post

It's not cutting out the casual game with wii remotes, just supplementing it. If it will drive casuals to the console, I don't know, but it's certainly not a hurdle. It gives people a cheap tablet and game console. If they have a f2p market with stuff like Zynga games, I can see it being a draw.
After Iwata declared at GDC that mobile, social, and F2P were "devauling" games, I don't think Nintendo will be in a rush to jump on the F2P market. They'll keep doing what they've been doing, which is using their digital marketplace primarily to repackage their back catalog. Remember, too, that Nintendo has a long history of holding onto the old ways of selling and packaging things. Cartridges for N64, offline play for GC, friend codes for Wii, etc. They're not in the business of changing technologies. Their focus has always been on design and control concepts. You know, things. They're far less innovative when it comes to abstract concepts like "services" or "digital delivery."
Quote:
Personally, I like the controller. One problem for me with the Wii was I felt the remote was more of a nuisance than anything in a lot of games. The gamepad is just a big controller with a screen in the middle. It gives the core gamer a cool controller and wiimotes will still be there for the casual crowd.
For a lot of non-traditional gamers, the Wii was the controller. I think this is the source of a lot of the confusion. People see Nintendo using Wii Remotes in its publicity and hear the same console name and see similar looking games, and they figure the GamePad is just a new Wii peripheral called the "Wii U."
post #355 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post

After Iwata declared at GDC that mobile, social, and F2P were "devauling" games, I don't think Nintendo will be in a rush to jump on the F2P market. They'll keep doing what they've been doing, which is using their digital marketplace primarily to repackage their back catalog. Remember, too, that Nintendo has a long history of holding onto the old ways of selling and packaging things. Cartridges for N64, offline play for GC, friend codes for Wii, etc. They're not in the business of changing technologies. Their focus has always been on design and control concepts. You know, things. They're far less innovative when it comes to abstract concepts like "services" or "digital delivery."

And yet the Wii U is set up to support f2p, microtranctions, dlc, and full digital distribution. Nintendo won't do f2p, but theres nothing stopping companies like Zynga. "We have designed the system from a technical standpoint to allow developers to freely take advantage of things like free to play and micro transactions." - Iwata
Quote:
For a lot of non-traditional gamers, the Wii was the controller. I think this is the source of a lot of the confusion. People see Nintendo using Wii Remotes in its publicity and hear the same console name and see similar looking games, and they figure the GamePad is just a new Wii peripheral called the "Wii U."

Yeah, but the Wii U will most likely release in November. Nintendo still has a ways to go. It really hasn't made a push towards the mainstream yet. I think we're getting ahead of ourselves.
Edited by Monger - 6/29/12 at 2:17pm
post #356 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monger View Post

And yet the Wii U is set up to support f2p, microtranctions, dlc, and full digital distribution. Nintendo won't do f2p, but theres nothing stopping companies like Zynga. "We have designed the system from a technical standpoint to allow developers to freely take advantage of things like free to play and micro transactions." - Iwata
Remains to be seen if history will repeat itself, but Nintendo's track record with third-party support isn't great. Saying simply, "they can do it if they want" isn't enough for it to happen. But as with everything else related to Wii U: we will see.
post #357 of 1142
I like the WiiU gamepad. About the only major thing I'd change is the inclusion of analog triggers. It appears as if the Pro Controller is the only thing that will have them.

It's a gamepad with a touch screen in the center. Don't see that being overly complicated (Nor as revolutionary as I think Nintendo wants it to appear... particularly since we all know that screen isn't going to be very important for the average WiiU title).

And Nintendo has spoken about doing full fledged digital releases of retail games for both the 3DS and WiiU. It's confirmed so there's no reason to think they're not going to do it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post

Would packing in a Wii Remote make that even more confusing? Tough to say. And so far, Nintendo has been surprisingly tone-deaf to that potential for confusion. So who knows.

If not a Wiimote, then something comparable that will get the same job done. They've created a strong niche for themselves in motion gaming, have spoken about wanting to retain that (As well as recapture what they've sort of lost with the traditional gamer), and with Sony and Micrsoft seemingly focusing on their own motion gaming, it's not a bubble that has burst that they can just start ignoring. It's important and is going to remain important.

Swinging a WiiU gamepad around simply isn't an option. If bundling in a Wiimote causes enough confusion to be problematic, I suggest they have bigger problems at hand. Failing to bundle in something appropriate for full fledged motion gaming means Nintendo can kiss much of the pie they've basically created away to the Microsoft and Sony camp.

Throwing all that away due to what is a marketing problem more than anything doesn't strike me as a wise idea. They worked hard to create this market, they're not going to just throw it all away.
post #358 of 1142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo_Ames View Post

with Sony and Micrsoft seemingly focusing on their own motion gaming, it's not a bubble that has burst that they can just start ignoring. It's important and is going to remain important.
That bubble has long since burst. Kinect is selling because of the tech, and it's meant to be a future force in MS's increased media focus, not gaming. And Sony long since ceased to care about anything Move related. The device sold okay, but in terms of gaming, it's dead. Motion gaming has moved on to touch-based technologies, which is why the GamePad should be Nintendo's primary focus.

I'm not as convinced as you are that there's still much of a market for Wii Remote focused games. In terms of sales numbers and in terms of games being made, I just don't see it. Nintendo should just do for the Wii Remotes on Wii U what they did for Gamecube controllers on the Wii: they were great for BC games. But to make them a major controller for a new console asks too much of developers and of consumers who already have to focus on too many different possible control methods--emphasizing one that has ceased to be relevant seems... strange.

Not saying it won't happen. I'm saying that it would be a bad idea.
post #359 of 1142
While I'd agree that motion gaming has decreased some as the novelty has wore off and also as people realized it was being shoehorned into many places where a traditional gamepad was superior (Particularly so during the early years of the Wii), I think it has normalized to something that's still valuable and worthwhile for them going after (Unlike something like the music gaming genre which seems to have all but died out completely).

I personally think Move is doing very well with what it has to offer. I'm starting to see quite a few Move games that interest me (Unlike basically nothing with Kinect although I haven't given Steel Battalion a look yet which might intrigue me some when I do). And from the focus they seem to place on them with their advertising, what they show off at trade shows, and how they're incorporating motion features in their big projects, I'd say Sony and Microsoft are still placing a lot of their eggs in the motion gaming basket.

While I don't expect nearly the same amount of motion games on the Wii U as the Wii saw, I still think they're going to want to fully embrace it on their new console. From budget software, kid oriented software, many sports games, party games like Mario Party and Wii Sports, and so on, there's still a place. Heck, one of their latest 1st party releases was fully motion (And Motion Plus at that) and has become the top selling game on the platform (Wii Sports Resort) despite being released years into the life of the platform. I find it difficult to believe it's no longer of importance for them like you're suggesting. Heck, even in the type of software of great interest to people like ourselves, there are more than a few games that many would argue are best suited to motion control. Zelda comes to mind thanks to Skyward Sword, games like Resident Evil 4 and Metroid Prime, etc.

Don't include a Wiimote or an equivalent out of the box and you just made it far more difficult for such projects to be justified. People need the controller to play and if that controller doesn't come with the console, that's a real headache for the number crunchers trying to figure out how well their project is going to perform to greenlight it. Don't include it and Nintendo is going to find motion gaming being something largely limited to the backwards compatibility features of the console and people flinging their WiiU gamepad upwards to make Mario spin into the air...
Edited by Leo_Ames - 6/30/12 at 2:17am
post #360 of 1142
I actually agree with a lot of what you're saying. I just think direction of so-called "motion gaming" has shifted quite a bit. The Wii may have fomented the change, but others have since evolved it. Consumer interest in Wii dropped off a cliff not because of outdated graphics tech. It was because the Wii's motion paradigm was outdated.

Also, third parties seem uninterested in continuing to emphasize the Wii Remote, and it's still not clear to me how any of Nintendo's first-party titles will use it--outside of multiplayer.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Nintendo
This thread is locked