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Circulating air in the room

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi folks -

While I was installing my PJ at the ceiling in my usually cold basement, I noted it was downright toasty at the ceiling, whereas cool at the floor (almost 9 foot ceiling).

Aside from ceiling fans (or I suppose regular fans aimed at the ceiling), is there stuff out there to help circulate the air within the room. Trying to beat physics and that heat rises stuff. Not sure if there is a blower that might push the air from the vents more force the air down/moving.

The supplies in the room are all in the ceiling (see pic, flanking the PJ, there is one more not in the pic, I think). A/C in the summer is not a problem. We have debated baseboard heat for a boost. This is more for when the kids are playing than when the PJ is running, as I can always grab a blanket.

post #2 of 10
Our last house was a split level with a fairly open floor plan, and we originally had problems with a temperature gradient like you are describing. When our HVAC died, we replaced the whole thing and upgraded the thermostat to a unit that provided much better control over the air handler. Long story short, it would turn on the air handler periodically (without AC or heat) just to mix the air in the house. That way, the air is a more uniform temperature, so you don't have "hot" air to collect at the ceiling and "cold" air to collect at the floor. The air is a more uniform temperature all-together.

I don't know if running the HVAC blower is an option for you.
post #3 of 10
there are thermostats out there that can run the fan every 30mins if the heat or cool did not run during that time.
I used it in my previous house without issue.
I recently read a bunch of stuff on the internet about how that is not good for your system.....beats me but I'm about to do it again in my new home.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
I am not opposed to running the blower. And/or maybe talk to a tech to see if there is anything with the "balance" to adjust or something or other. I kind of wish we had a supply or two mounted lower. The furnace is in the next room, so I suppose we could add that.
post #5 of 10
I don't know that adding a supply would fix the problem. If you don't get the air in the room to a uniform temperature, I think it would still separate fairly quickly. It sounds like it's a problem of keeping the air moving for longer.
post #6 of 10
I would suggest a RETURN high on the wall before another supply. You can't blow any more air into the room unless you take some out.
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

I don't know that adding a supply would fix the problem. If you don't get the air in the room to a uniform temperature, I think it would still separate fairly quickly. It sounds like it's a problem of keeping the air moving for longer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tlogan6797 View Post

I would suggest a RETURN high on the wall before another supply. You can't blow any more air into the room unless you take some out.

Good points. Something to think about.
post #8 of 10
Wouldn't you want the return close to the floor in order to pull the heat down? The "recommended" practice for HVAC in basements here in Canada is to have the supplies brought down to the floor and have the return up high. Since your supply is already set and you have access to the ductwork in the furnace room, perhaps look into moving the return. Just a thought. Good luck.
post #9 of 10
The IDEAL Ideal is to have one up and one down that can be regulated based on whether you are trying to heat or cool.

Advert -

Looks like you are correct. I missed that the supplies are in the ceiling. In that case, you would want the return low on the wall.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
I'll have to look around and see where the return is. I might be bring an old fashion fan in the room and see how that does.
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