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5e continuity

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
This is new construction. There are 8 plates with 5e cable at them and five (5) 5e cables in the basement (source). One of those 5 basement cables appears to be a service line to the outside for telco. (I don't have landline service).

I hope to use at least some of the 5e cabling for wired-ethernet but here's what I'm running into.

It appears there is one 5e cable serving four plates. Two of the plates contain one (only) 5e cable. Two of the plates contain two 5e cables each. (If these four plates were daisy-chained I would expect to find two (2) 5e cables in three of the plates and one 5e cable in one of the plates.)

It seemed to me I should be able to make a good data connection at one of those plates at minimum.

In testing for continuity with a simple battery-powered tester I connect the green/green-white wire at a plate and search for continuity at the source. I find none.

If I connect a green/green-white pair at the source I find continuity at several plates.

I can't get my head around this. I haven't called the electrician who installed this, but I can if necessary. It just seems like something pretty basic I should be able to figure out.
post #2 of 6
That's why electricians should leave low voltage wiring to low-voltage pros. Who still daisy-chains telephone wiring? I'd do my testing with the blue pair, not the green, to determine what goes where.
post #3 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgreenwood View Post

If I connect a green/green-white pair at the source I find continuity at several plates.

OK, u gotta think what these wires were originally intended for: 2-wire phone lines. So in a typical U.S. household, the phone company runs two 2-pairs wire into your junction box (4 wires total) for two possible phone numbers.

Now most home use only a single phone number.

So as you connect the green/green-white pair at the source, THESE ARE the pairs that the original installer used for your single phone number.

Now of course even with a single number, the occupants often times want the phone in each room to ring as calls are received.

So if you look carefully around/behind the source panel, hopefully you will see the different pairs from the plates are spliced together to become one pair and connect to the incoming this way. If u don't see it here, then there is a junction somewhere else where the splice was done, and well, good luck finding it.

Now at the plates, please do unscrew the plate and look see how many wires are REALLY there. For data connection you need at least 4 wires (2 pairs). If u see only 1 pair ur done for.

Now this assumes the wirer did the star topology thing, which he should had done. The next bad scenario is, he used two pairs and went:

source - pair one - plate1 - plate2 - plate3.

and

source - pair two - plate1 - plate2 - plate3.

In this case you should see two pairs at each plate and only one pair is being connected.

As long as you have two separate pairs, you can make 1 data connection.
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBobb View Post

if you look carefully around/behind the source panel, hopefully you will see the different pairs from the plates are spliced together to become one pair and connect to the incoming this way. If u don't see it here, then there is a junction somewhere else where the splice was done, and well, good luck finding it.

Thank you all. I called the electrician and he remembered there were three cables in one of the boxes (I had only seen two, but there were in fact three there). Then I was off and running and traced all the remaining wires.

So I will home-run one or two Cat6 cables to the basement and should then be good to go. Next time I build a house I will pay closer attention. Thankfully, wife is happy with wifi. I think she'll be even happier with a wired connection.
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by cshepard View Post

That's why electricians should leave low voltage wiring to low-voltage pros. Who still daisy-chains telephone wiring? I'd do my testing with the blue pair, not the green, to determine what goes where.

I still run across new homes (newer than 2 years old) that were cabled with 2-pair cable.
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by egnlsn View Post

I still run across new homes (newer than 2 years old) that were cabled with 2-pair cable.

sumbody had a old stock of 2-pairs.
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