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post #241 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal1981 View Post

How's about this charge:

Reckless endangerment: A person commits the crime of reckless endangerment if the person recklessly engages in conduct which creates a substantial risk of serious physical injury to another person. “Reckless” conduct is conduct that exhibits a culpable disregard of foreseeable consequences to others from the act or omission involved. The accused need not intentionally cause a resulting harm. The ultimate question is whether, under all the circumstances, the accused’s conduct was of that heedless nature that made it actually or imminently dangerous to the rights or safety of others.

Seems to fit Ellis' actions.

It is simple physical assault causing harm especially when it is made clear he knew the results of his actions. It is also economic in that he was attempting to destroy her job. IE Criminal and Civil lawsuits.
So the following complaints can be made:
1) Physical Assault - The State vs Ellis
2) Damage to Rebecca's career - Civil Rebecca vs Ellis
3) Damage to Eileen and her backers - Civil Investors vs Ellis

He is in BIG BIG trouble! It happened at the very end - so its easily something for next year.
post #242 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVChallenged View Post

Of course anyone that would be "so careful about what she eats" would also most likely have a quick rescue epi-pen within reach at all times.

Didn't Rebecca say that she could smell something in the smoothie before she slugged it down? Makes you wonder, doesn't it?
post #243 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal1981 View Post

Didn't Rebecca say that she could smell something in the smoothie before she slugged it down? Makes you wonder, doesn't it?

She as much as admitted that she used it as an excuse to get out of doing the show.
post #244 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal1981 View Post

How's about this charge

I don't know. (IANAL)

That would fit if Ellis mixed in peanuts in the hope that Uma had a peanut allergy.

But he did know that for a fact. So the endangerment wasn't "reckless"---it was deliberate.
post #245 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal1981 View Post

Didn't Rebecca say that she could smell something in the smoothie before she slugged it down? Makes you wonder, doesn't it?

I believe the exact wording was "taste," whereupon she continued to drink it anyway.
post #246 of 397
Four "Smash" regular characters leaving and/or downgraded to guest stars for upcoming season 2: http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/05/22/smash-ellis-dev/
post #247 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

[b][size="3"]Four "Smash" regular characters leaving and/or downgraded to guest stars for upcoming season

Well, that's an improvement. They are eliminating the characters which where only there to add a cheesy soap opera element to the show. The parts of the show that seemed added only to entice viewers away from the Lifetime network. Sounds like a big improvement to me.
post #248 of 397
Now they just need to get rid of Julia's son and I might be tricked into coming back for season 2!
post #249 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by vfxproducer View Post

Well, that's an improvement. They are eliminating the characters which where only there to add a cheesy soap opera element to the show. The parts of the show that seemed added only to entice viewers away from the Lifetime network. Sounds like a big improvement to me.

Except for the fact that the new showrunner(s) are haloing in from the CW ... so I'm sure we can expect fewer soap-suds next season ....
post #250 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by vfxproducer View Post

Well, that's an improvement. They are eliminating the characters which where only there to add a cheesy soap opera element to the show. The parts of the show that seemed added only to entice viewers away from the Lifetime network. Sounds like a big improvement to me.

I agree. Although the Indian boyfriend, the sleazy assistant, and Julia's husband were regulars, I didn't think that Will Chase had been, at least for most of the season. I hope the showrunners can figure out a way to continue use Chase in episodes in which his big time Broadway chops can be brought to bear. The other three, though, are good riddance. No harm will be done if we never see them again, it seems to me.
post #251 of 397
I saw a blurb that the show was putting out recordings of some of the tunes in the show. Was that a dvd or merely a cd rendering? I would enjoy a dvd, I think, as some of the productions were very good. I found myself watching and enduring the melodrama just waiting for production numbers. Kind of like Glee, but with that show the putrid storyline made it impossible for me to endure long enough for the otherwise excellent tunes and performances.
post #252 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Distorted View Post

I saw a blurb that the show was putting out recordings of some of the tunes in the show. Was that a dvd or merely a cd rendering? I would enjoy a dvd, I think, as some of the productions were very good. I found myself watching and enduring the melodrama just waiting for production numbers. Kind of like Glee, but with that show the putrid storyline made it impossible for me to endure long enough for the otherwise excellent tunes and performances.

The CD is out but the Target version had five more songs that the one listed on Amazon:

September Song
Our Day Will Come
Breakaway
Run
Everything's Coming Up Roses

Incredibly, neither version has Lexington and 52nd Street or McPhee's brilliant Don't Forget Me finale.
post #253 of 397
Well, we finally caught up with the last 4 episodes. I think that in the end, we will probably come back for season 2 after all. Great musical numbers (except for Dev's and Huston's - my ears still hurt from those), and it seems that some of the personal silliness has been toned down to a tolerable level.

With the demotion or elimination of the above mentioned characters, I think this show could only get better.

I'm still on Team Ivy, but Karen was pretty great too!
post #254 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsambuca View Post

I'm still on Team Ivy, but Karen was pretty great too!

Ivy is a toad...Team Karen FTW
post #255 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsambuca View Post

Well, we finally caught up with the last 4 episodes. I think that in the end, we will probably come back for season 2 after all. Great musical numbers (except for Dev's and Huston's - my ears still hurt from those), and it seems that some of the personal silliness has been toned down to a tolerable level.

I loved Angelica Huston's performance of September Song. It had been written by Kurt Weil and Maxwell Anderson for Huston's grandfather, Walter Huston. Huston was starring in Weill and Anderson' 1938 Broadway Musical, Knickerbocker Holiday, and wanted a song he could sing. Weill and Anderson obliged. September Song went on to become one of the great modern standards. Walter Huston didn't have a great voice and neither does Angelica Huston. Nevertheless, like her grandfather before her, Anjelica Huston is a consummate artist and I thought her grandfather's connection with the song she performed made it especially effective.
post #256 of 397
Thanks for the history. I appreciated Angelica's performance even before the connection was explained.
post #257 of 397
From the "Hot Off The Press" Thread (top of 'HDTV Programming' page) biggrin.gif

TV Notes
NBC Series Saved by Delayed Viewership
By Bill Carter, The New York Times - Jun. 25, 2012

The narrative about the new NBC drama “Smash” this spring, promulgated largely by critics and bloggers, centered on the show’s serial failings: it did not live up to its pilot; it alienated viewers with sappy writing and acting; and the only reason NBC ordered a second season was because Bob Greenblatt, the top NBC entertainment executive, decided its fate based on his heart, not his head.

The bottom line was that “Smash,” after weeks of deteriorating ratings, was a flop.

So how did such a disaster wind up tying for the top position at 10 p.m. among viewers most coveted by network executives — those 18 through 49 years old? The answer lies with the digital video recorder, or DVR.

Negative reports about the performance of “Smash” generally took into account only how it had fared on the first nights that it was shown on NBC. As is now the case in prime time, however, a show’s true popularity can no longer be assessed by instant analysis.

The first-place 18-49 ranking for “Smash” occurred in what is known as the “live+7” ratings, which include playback of recorded television shows over one week.

On average, “Smash” added 2.5 million viewers over seven days of playback and averaged a 3.3 rating in the 18-49 category. No 10 p.m. network show did better in that category. Two CBS dramas, “Hawaii Five-O” and “C.S.I.,” each scored a 3.3 also.

“Playback is a big factor in determining how many people like a show, there’s no question about it,” said Leslie Moonves, the CBS president, who has more programming experience than any other current television executive.

Brad Adgate, the longtime head of research for the media buying firm Horizon Media, acknowledged being astonished that “Smash” had a 3.3. “That’s a good number for a show in any time period,” he said. “It’s especially good at 10 o’clock.”

The viewers that the show consistently added over seven days, Mr. Adgate said, meant that it surely deserved to be renewed for a second season.

“A lot of insights can be gleaned from playback,” he said. “It is an indication of how passionate people are about shows.”

Increasingly, delayed viewing must be factored in by networks trying to decide which shows to retain and which to reject, Mr. Moonves said. He pointed to how many viewers were added by “Hawaii Five-O” each week: more than 2.4 million. “That is a big, big number,” he said.

What the “live+7” performance does not do is make more money for the networks. The accepted system of advertising sales continues to be based on what is called a “commercial+3” rating: that is, how many viewers watched the commercials within three days of a show’s first broadcast. (Advertisers do not want to pay for viewers who skip through all the commercials.)

But looking at how many viewers were added on delayed viewing does give programmers a better sense of how ardently a show is being followed.

“Smash” ranked fifth among shows in terms of number of viewers added. ABC’s “Modern Family” was on top with 3.3 million. But as often is the case in television, the results should contain an asterisk. “Smash,” which is designed to run only original shows, did not present any repeats in the season that ended in May. Measured against only the original episodes of other shows, it would rank behind several other 10 p.m. dramas, though its 3.3 is still a strong performance for that time slot.

The example of “Smash” mainly proves that initial ratings are not a particularly valid currency, though they still are the ones most widely reported and discussed in the industry.

Preston Beckman, the longtime programming scheduling executive, first at NBC and then Fox, said, “The relative strength of shows doesn’t change all that much,” when playback is considered. Hits only get bigger; failures improve, sometimes by startling percentages, but never add enough viewers to change the overall impression.

The NBC drama “Awake,” for example, had one of the highest percentage increases of any show on television over seven days — 61 percent. But that only meant it edged up from a rating of 1.08 to 1.74, still cancellation territory.

On the other hand, another NBC drama, “Grimm,” gained 69 percent over seven days, but that was a lift from 1.53 to 2.58, strong for a show on Friday night.

“Some marginal shows suddenly start to look more viable,” Mr. Beckman said. “That’s one of the reasons why some of the networks are still trying to build scripted shows on Fridays. Friday numbers become more acceptable with playback factored in.” Friday is now the second least-watched weeknight, after Saturday, so networks tend to run less costly shows like newsmagazines and reality shows.

But the analysis is mainly important in terms of how much a show is valued by viewers — not by advertisers.

One senior NBC executive, Ted Harbert, suggested to advertisers at the NBC upfront sales presentation last month that it might be time to consider basing ad sales on seven days of viewing instead of three.

That is not likely to happen, Mr. Adgate said. “If Nielsen reported live plus 21 days, the networks would want to get paid for that,” he said. And Mr. Beckman conceded, “A lot of delayed viewing is a function of commercial avoidance.”

But Mr. Adgate suggested that another trend may hold out more hope for making a profit from delayed viewing. He noted growth in network series being watched on a video-on-demand basis: viewers ordering episodes they have missed. “In V.O.D. they can include commercials that you can’t skip through,” he said.
.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/25/business/media/nbcs-smash-owes-renewal-to-power-of-delayed-viewership.html?_r=1&ref=television
post #258 of 397
Jennifer Hudson On 'Smash': Oscar Winner Signs For Season 2 Guest Star Role
The Huffington Post | By Christopher Rosen
Posted: 06/23/2012 10:07 am Updated: 06/23/2012 10:18 am

Jennifer Hudson is headed to "Smash," NBC announced via press release on Friday night.

The Oscar-winning actress will appear as a guest star on multiple episodes during the second season of the Broadway drama, starting with the season premiere. Per NBC, Hudson will play "Veronica Moore, a Tony Award-winning Broadway star who impacts the lives of Karen (Katharine McPhee) and Ivy (Megan Hilty)."

Hudson, a former "American Idol" contestant, joins Uma Thurman and Nick Jonas as famous faces who have done guest stints on the polarizing series.

"We're thrilled to have Jennifer Hudson coming to ‘Smash,’” Robert Greenblatt, chairman of NBC Entertainment, said in the curiously timed press release (Friday evening missives are normally reserved for bad news). "This series is a showcase for some of the best musical talent in the business and that's a fitting description for Jennifer Hudson. Her character will represent someone who reached their Broadway dream but also paid a price for it."

Hudson isn't the only newcomer headed to "Smash." Tony nominee Jeremy Jordan is on board for Season 2 as well. The series has undergone a swift makeover in the wake of its first season, with four of its co-stars -- Jamie Cepero (Ellis), Raza Jaffery (Dev), Will Chase (Michael) and Brian D'Arcy (Frank) -- all reportedly leaving the show. (D'Arcy recently revealed that he'll come back for at least one episode.) Former "Gossip Girl" executive producer Josh Safran is now in charge of "Smash," replacing former showrunner Theresa Rebeck.

For Hudson, appearing on "Smash" could potentially bring her one step closer to an EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony). The actress famously won an Academy Award for her role in "Dreamgirls," and earned a Grammy for her debut album, "Jennifer Hudson." Even if an Emmy doesn't come Hudson's way, at least she'll have all those decorative "Smash" scarves to wear throughout her guest arc.

Look for the series to return to television sometime in 2013.
post #259 of 397
post #260 of 397
Bad news for fans of this show--Smash scored a pitiful 1.1 rating. Bringing it back for another season was the kind of decision that gets someone (Bob Greenblatt) fired. Good luck NBC with that "delayed viewership" rating that advertisers will pay nothing for.
post #261 of 397
It was nice to see some skin on Ms. McPhee last night smile.gif
post #262 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarod M View Post

Good luck NBC with that "delayed viewership" rating that advertisers will pay nothing for.

 

After a long, drawn-out debate, media buyers and the networks reached an agreement five years ago to change the currency ad buys are based on to C3 ratings, or commercial ratings including three-day DVR playback.

 

C+3 day commercial ratings: They determine how much the networks get paid for their advertising. They measure Live and DVR viewing of the average commercial minute during a show within 3 days of airdate. They are rarely available in public.

post #263 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarod M View Post

Bad news for fans of this show--Smash scored a pitiful 1.1 rating. Bringing it back for another season was the kind of decision that gets someone (Bob Greenblatt) fired. Good luck NBC with that "delayed viewership" rating that advertisers will pay nothing for.

The Nielsen number was adjusted up very slightly to a 1.2/3.

This show must cost a fortune to produce and it's just not able to find an audience. So what is it's future?
post #264 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Peterson View Post

The Nielsen number was adjusted up very slightly to a 1.2/3.

This show must cost a fortune to produce and it's just not able to find an audience. So what is it's future?

Clearly there won't be a second season. But maybe they can monitize the soundtrack and eventually produce a real musical of "Bombshell". I don't get it. confused.gif DWTS gets huge numbers (finally falling some now, but still big), so I would have thought there was a built-in audience for a show like this. I see its flaws but it's fun too, it's got great eye candy, and Broadway musicals are still popular with the masses.


Another Big Swing for a broadcast network, another failure. Oh well; I'm sure another cop procedural will do fine in this time slot. Heaven knows we don't have enough of them.
post #265 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

..... I don't get it. confused.gif DWTS gets huge numbers (finally falling some now, but still big), so I would have thought there was a built-in audience for a show like this. I see its flaws but it's fun too, it's got great eye candy....
I've always(since first season) been a big fan of DWTS(and also SYTYCD) and started watching Smash for the dancing. I quickly learned it wasn't so much a dance program as a program about the backstage of dance(and song). I almost gave up on it but kept watching and I'm glad I did because I like it now(haven't watched the season premiere yet but it's on my DVR and hopefully I'll get to it tonight). While it doesn't really have enough singing and dancing for my tastes and a bit too much backstage antics, what little it does is quite good and like you said, you can't argue with the eye candy and NBCs very good looking picture quality. If it goes away I'll miss it frown.gif
post #266 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Clearly there won't be a second season. But maybe they can monitize the soundtrack and eventually produce a real musical of "Bombshell". I don't get it. confused.gif DWTS gets huge numbers (finally falling some now, but still big), so I would have thought there was a built-in audience for a show like this. I see its flaws but it's fun too, it's got great eye candy, and Broadway musicals are still popular with the masses.


Another Big Swing for a broadcast network, another failure. Oh well; I'm sure another cop procedural will do fine in this time slot. Heaven knows we don't have enough of them.

I'm not quite ready to give up on Smash yet. I suspect (hope) that the numbers were so low for the first episode of Season 2 because it was two hours long. Season 2 is supposed to have 13 episodes so maybe it will get enough of its audience back to survive. I sure hope so.
post #267 of 397
I watched the Smash season premiere last night and was blown away. The music was both plentiful and wonderful. Kathryn McPhee's Moving On, which opened the show was great and the hits just kept on coming. Jeremy Jordan, as Jimmy, was terrific and had a couple of beautiful solos. Jordan is a Broadway musical theater regular and it showed. The Smash season premiers was one of the best episodes of any series I have seen in a while. I just hope the showrunners can keep up the quality -- and don't run out of money.smile.gif
post #268 of 397

Pretty obvious that this can't last.  Personally, I love it but I'm a fan of Broadway in general and that is likely too small an audience for such a costly production.  I like the upcoming story of competing shows, but fear we'll never see a reasonable conclusion.  Oh well, I can just enjoy it for what it is now, the music and McPheever.  No complex sci-fi plots to get left unresoved.

post #269 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

I watched the Smash season premiere last night and was blown away. The music was both plentiful and wonderful. Kathryn McPhee's Moving On, which opened the show was great and the hits just kept on coming. Jeremy Jordan, as Jimmy, was terrific and had a couple of beautiful solos. Jordan is a Broadway musical theater regular and it showed. The Smash season premiers was one of the best episodes of any series I have seen in a while. I just hope the showrunners can keep up the quality -- and don't run out of money.smile.gif

Jordan is great and has been Tony nominated for his performance in Newsies. There are a lot of Broadway regulars coming in and out of the show. Karen's new roommate is Krysta Rodriguez, last seen as Wednesday in The Adaams Family and she was also a cast member of In the Heights and Spring Awakening. She does a very nice version of Broadway Here I Come that's on YouTube. It looks like there may actually be three shows running within the story lines. Bombshell, the new show that Sean Hayes and Ivy are in and a possible show built around Jordan's character's music. If so, the costs behind Smash will be even greater, That's a lot of actors, dancers, music and sets to have to pony up the cash for. The two hour opener really showed a potentially great season but I hope that ratings and fiscal concerns don't sink the show. Did you see that a CD of the entire score of the imaginary show Bombshell is actually being released next week? It has something like 22 different numbers on it.
post #270 of 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by flint350 View Post

Pretty obvious that this can't last.  Personally, I love it but I'm a fan of Broadway in general and that is likely too small an audience for such a costly production.  I like the upcoming story of competing shows, but fear we'll never see a reasonable conclusion.  Oh well, I can just enjoy it for what it is now, the music and McPheever.  No complex sci-fi plots to get left unresoved.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal1981 View Post

Jordan is great and has been Tony nominated for his performance in Newsies. There are a lot of Broadway regulars coming in and out of the show. Karen's new roommate is Krysta Rodriguez, last seen as Wednesday in The Adaams Family and she was also a cast member of In the Heights and Spring Awakening. She does a very nice version of Broadway Here I Come that's on YouTube. It looks like there may actually be three shows running within the story lines. Bombshell, the new show that Sean Hayes and Ivy are in and a possible show built around Jordan's character's music. If so, the costs behind Smash will be even greater, That's a lot of actors, dancers, music and sets to have to pony up the cash for. The two hour opener really showed a potentially great season but I hope that ratings and fiscal concerns don't sink the show. Did you see that a CD of the entire score of the imaginary show Bombshell is actually being released next week? It has something like 22 different numbers on it.

Like you guys, I am a self-confessed Broadway fanboy and worry for the show's future because of the relatively narrow audience for Broadway music there is these days and because of the high price required to make the show. Anyway, it's great while it lasts.

Call1981 -- Thanks for the heads up about Krysta Rodriguez. I got as far as learning her name from IMDb but didn't realize that she was another Broadway star. No surprise there, though, the girl can really sing.
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